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MARC QUINN (b. 1964)

 
Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze. Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze.
Archaeology of Desire200892 1/2 x 116 x 39 1/2 in. patina bronze
Provenance
White Cube Gallery, London 2008
Private Collection, California
Contemporary artist Marc Quinn is associated with the Young British Artists movement, alongside Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, and Sarah Lucas. Quinn’s early work dealt with decay and preservation, often incorporating degradable materials such as bread, flowers, or his own blood. The orchid is a recurring image in Quinn’s work and features frequently in his sculptures. The 2008 sculpture “Archaeology of Desire” represents the period when Quinn began to use bronze – casting an image of his most notable floral theme. Here, Quinn captures a symbol of beauty, frailty, and impermanence, preserving it in bronze.
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A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
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