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ELAINE DE KOONING (1918-1989)

 
Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection. Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
<br>
<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
<br>
<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection.
Study of John F. Kennedy196362 1/8 x 43 1/8 in.(157.8 x 109.54 cm) charcoal on canvas
Provenance
Estate of the Artist
Conrad Fried, New York
Private Collection, New York
 
Literature
Fortune, Brandon Brame, Ann Eden Gibson, and Simona ?upi?. Elaine De Kooning: Portraits. Prestel Publishing, 2015, p.111
Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.

This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.

Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection.
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