Back

ROY LICHTENSTEIN (1923-1997)

 
Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle.
Reflections on Crash199059 1/8 x 75 in. lithograph, screenprint, relief, and metalized PVC collage
Provenance
Sotheby's London: Tuesday, April 1, 2008 [Lot 00454]
Melissa Morgan Fine Art, Palm Desert, California
Private Collection, California

195,000

Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle.
Inquire

Similar Artworks

Alexander Calder's "The Palm Tree" (1947) has an understated beauty and brings to life Calder's mastery of the oil paint medium. The present work is  registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number #A08381. This painting was acquired by the current owner directly from Perls Galleries in New York in 1974. Perls was one of the primary dealers of Calder's work. The painting has never been to auction and has remained in the same private collection since 1974.

ALEXANDER CALDER

After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme.

SAM FRANCIS

Richard Prince is one of the most influential names in contemporary art. Prince is part of The Pictures Generation, a loosely associated group of artists who appropriated mass media imagery to examine and question issues of stereotypes, cultural tropes, and the constructed narrative of images. Prince and The Pictures Generation helped to usher in post-modernism in art.
<br>
<br>In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. "Untitled (Portrait)(Boy)" was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work and series ask us to question the meaning within the proliferation of “selfies” and how people use these images to create and to project a narrative of themselves. It also challenges ideas of authorship, both constructing and deconstructing the nature of images while capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media.

RICHARD PRINCE

ALEXANDER CALDER - Woman with Square Umbrella - wood - 19 x 6 x 6 in.

ALEXANDER CALDER

Mel Ramos is best known for his paintings of superheroes and female nudes juxtaposed with pop culture imagery. Ramos’s Peek-A-Boo portfolio is a well-known series by the artist, positioning the viewer to observe the pin-up girl figures through a keyhole shape surrounded by black. The series is noted for the confident and direct gazes of its subjects as well as the commentary it provides on the sexualization of a traditional art historical motif: the nude female figure. Alongside fellow Pop artists like Andy Warhol, James Rosenquist, and friend Roy Lichtenstein, Ramos provided a visual language for audiences to understand and experience the proliferation of commercial images that exploded in post-war America.

MEL RAMOS

Richard Tuttle is a seminal American postminimalist artist. Tuttle’s work is conceptual and meditative, crossing the boundary of sculpture, painting, and poetry, and often challenging the viewer. Untitled (Cloth and Paint Work #2) from 1973, a pivotal period in the artist’s career, evokes the earlier minimalism of his career while pushing towards material-based conceptual art. In the work he pays homage to Marcel Duchamp’s readymades. Textiles, as in this piece, play a large role in his oeuvre and become sites on which to focus performance, engagement, and meaning.

RICHARD TUTTLE

Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure.

GEORGE CONDO

TIM HAWKINSON - Forest Ear - wood and mixed media - 72 x 48 x 1 3/4 in.

TIM HAWKINSON

GEORGE CONDO - Girl With Bow Tie - oil on canvas - 39 1/4 x 28 3/4 in

GEORGE CONDO

LOUISE BOURGEOIS - Plate 5 of 9 from He Disappeared Into Complete Silence - engraving - 8 x 6 in.

LOUISE BOURGEOIS

ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE - Orchids - dye-transfer print - 22 1/2 x 21 1/2 in.

ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE

ROLAND PETERSEN - Luncheon - oil on canvas - 24 1/4 x 26 3/8 in.

ROLAND PETERSEN

ALEXANDER CALDER - Compositions with Faces and Forms - ink on paper - 15 1/2 x 23 in. ea.

ALEXANDER CALDER

LAWRENCE SCHILLER - Marilyn Monroe - vintage silver gelatin photograph - 11 x 14 in.

LAWRENCE SCHILLER

PAUL WONNER - Figure and Plant - oil on canvas - 48 x 40 in.

PAUL WONNER

AMY SILLMAN - Untitled #7 - gouache, chalk, and pencil on etching on paper - 31 x 28 in.

AMY SILLMAN

KENNETH NOLAND - Diagonal Stripe VI-21 - handmade paper - 48 x 33 1/2  in.

KENNETH NOLAND

TSENG KWONG CHI - Oshima, Japan - silver gelatin print - 16 x 20 in.

TSENG KWONG CHI

WILLIAM WEGMAN - On Mrs. Wegman's Couch - C-Print - 4 x 4 in.

WILLIAM WEGMAN

MASAKO TAKAHASHI - Untitled - oil on canvas - 32 x 26 in.

MASAKO TAKAHASHI

LAWRENCE SCHILLER - Contact Sheet, Marilyn Monroe, "Something's Got to Give" - Silver Gelatin Photograph - 20 x 24 in.

LAWRENCE SCHILLER

CLINTON HILL - Untitled - gouache on paper - 18 1/2 x 24 in.

CLINTON HILL