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CHARLES ARNOLDI (b. 1946)

 
Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.  
<br>
<br>Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more
Construction1982128 x 68 x 8 in. acrylic on plywood and found wooden sticks
Provenance
Imago Galleries, Palm Desert, California
Private Collection, California
 

175,000

Charles Arnoldi seamlessly blends an organic element to his geometric constructions. In “Construction” (1982), Arnoldi works on an immense scale. The work envelops the viewer and space with its strong vertical composition. Hundreds of individual elements were painstakingly painted and laid into position, a meticulous process of creation central to Arnoldi’s work.

Other examples by Arnoldi are held by major private and public collections, most notably the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Denver Art Museum, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, LACMA, the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and more
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