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ANDY WARHOL (1928-1987)

 
Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
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<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso. Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art. 
<br>
<br>Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso.
Electric Chairs197135 3/8 x 47 7/8 in. ea.(89.85 x 121.6 cm) screenprint
Provenance
Julian Schnabel, purchased directly from the artist
Private Collection
Private Collection, New York
Literature
Feldman & Schellmann II.74-83
Andy Warhol, who famously said that, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes,” was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, businesspeople, and socialites. He was obsessed with exploring hallmarks of a consumer society such as wealth and fame. From his renowned Factory studio in New York, Warhol became a pop culture icon, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, and a name synonymous with Pop art.

Warhol's notable Death and Disaster series addresses depictions of death in the media, commenting on desensitization through repeated imagery. Often using photos from mass-circulated newspapers, magazines, and tabloids, Warhol took them out of the journalistic context and appropriated them in artwork. “Electric Chairs” (1971), based on an image of the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison, belongs to this series. Warhol first used this subject matter in 1963 and returned to the image for this 1971 set of prints, in which he put more prominence on the chair by cropping the image. Here, Warhol repeats the image ten times in different color combinations. Each screenprint is hand-signed and stamped on the verso.
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