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LOUISE BOURGEOIS (1911-2010)

 
Untitled1998 - 201410 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. glass hologram
Provenance
Private Collection, California

20,000

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"San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
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<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
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<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
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<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation.

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A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
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<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
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<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007.

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Gary Hume's "Seabird" (2006) is a bold, innovative work that shows his talent in seamlessly forming a geometric composition with his signature gloss-paint on aluminum technique. This piece is bright, playful, and an excellent example of Hume's work.
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<br>Gary Hume was an early member of the "YBA" or Young British Artist group.  Hume participated, alongside Damien Hirst, in the seminal 1988 London exhibition "Freeze."  Elected to the Royal Academy in 2001, Hume was also nominated for the 1996 Turner Prize. The artist was also subject of a critically acclaimed 2013 retrospective exhibition at the Tate Britain.  
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<br>Hume's work is widely represented in Museum collections worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Tate in London.

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Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness.

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"Big Grid / Solo Tear" (2008) is a sculptural work by the multidisciplinary artist Sterling Ruby. Ruby makes urethane and bronze sculptures, hallucinatory color-field canvases, and handmade ceramics. The artist's work addresses inner conflict inherent to the human condition and the artist's role in society.  
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<br>"And in that moment, you, the artist, disappear, and the works exist independently. The object becomes more than a sum of the parts that you have formally constructed."
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<br>-Sterling Ruby

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MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in.

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More than an artist, Theaster Gates also works as curator, urban planner, and project facilitator. From sculpture to painting, installation to public projects, Gates’s works are hubs in which to question labor and commodity while also bringing to the fore people and things that are often unseen and unheard. Convex Concave takes custom-made bricks that Gates had previously used for Black Vessel for a Saint at the Walker Art Center and repurposes it into a painting-like sculpture that references minimalist artist like Sol LeWitt, the labor of making bricks, and the original context of the bricks for the installation at the Walker.

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Ross Bleckner is a celebrated American painter whose works reference loss, memory, and change such as explorations of the cell during the AIDS epidemic or in response to his father’s cancer diagnosis. The 1965 MoMA exhibition that brought Op Art to the fore, The Responsive Eye and included artists Richard Anuszkiewicz, Tadasky, and Francis Celentano, had a profound influence on him as an artist. This painting, like his other immersive, large-scale works, elicit a powerful, hypnotic, dizzying effect. Aesthetically pleasing, Bleckner’s canvases explore perception – visual, emotional, physical, time. Bleckner is part of the same generation of and friends with Julian Schnabel, David Salle, Eric Fischl, and Peter Halley, all of whom returned painterly technique to the canvas.

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Ed Ruscha is one of the most distinguished American artists due in part for his explorations of the symbols of Americana and the relationship between language and art. The End is a cinematic theme that the artist used in the 1990s and 2000s, appearing in paintings, prints, and drawings – notably the 1991 large-scale painting at the Museum of Modern Art. Addressing the passage of time and obsolescence, Ruscha makes use of an antiquated typeface and an old cinematic tradition of using text in film. The concept of ephemerality is enhanced by the words themselves, The End, and the nature of the medium itself; considered futuristic when it was developed in the 1960s, the laser technology for holograms also creates a sense of impermanence as the images change with the viewer’s movement. While there is innate movement in the shifting words and images, these holograms also represent a full stop – a transitory moment frozen in time.

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Sculptural work by Theaster Gates is anchored in the artist’s long-standing commitment to social action and responsibility, rooted in his home city of Chicago. The wooden frame of "Lathe Black Box" from 2012 is made of wood from The Dorchester Project, one of his best-known pieces. The project transformed a dilapidated building in Chicago’s South Side into a community gathering place and a celebration of local culture. Gates has described this project as part of a “circular ecological system,” selling sculptural works from the material of these projects to finance the ongoing building renovations. In recent years, his creative efforts do not only consist of making fine art from construction materials, but also extend to creating construction materials as fine art. 
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<br>Much of Gates’s work deals with history, memory, and renewal. The mirrored glass at the center of "Lathe Black Box" creates an ambiguous effect, confronting the viewer with their own reflection.

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