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CINDY SHERMAN (b. 1954)

 
CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in. CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in. CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in. CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in. CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in. CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in. CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in. CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in. CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in.
Untitled2010/201234 x 23 1/4 in. color photograph
Provenance
Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York
2013 Ninth Annual BAMart Silent Auction, Paddle 8
Private Collection, Puerto Rico

125,000

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