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ALEX KATZ (b. 1927)

 
Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness. Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness.
Ukulele Player198154 x 48 in. oil on canvas
Provenance
Marlborogh Gallery, New York
Private Collection, North Carolina
Leland Little Auctions, Ltd., "The Winter Quarterly Auction", Lot 177, 2 December, 2017 Private Collection, Puerto Rico
Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness.
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