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GUILLERMO KUITCA (b. 1961)

 
GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in.
Untitled201118 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. oil on plywood
Provenance
Hauser & Worth
Private Collection, California, 2011

65,000

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