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LEON GASPARD

 
Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory. Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places. 
<br>
<br>"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia. 
<br>
<br>In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory.
Siberian Sleighriders192146 1/2 x 39 1/2 in. in. oil on canvas on board
Provenance
Gerald P. Peters, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Berry-Hill Galleries, Inc., New York
Private Collection, Arizona
Literature
New York, Leon Gaspard (1882-1964), Berry-Hill Galleries, 6-23 May 1986, no. 9
Russian-born painter Leon Gaspard lived in Taos, New Mexico, for most of his life and traveled extensively to paint. His compositions were typically populated with crowds of people, depicting folk traditions and the bustling landscapes of small towns in Russia, Asia, and the Taos Valley, where he maintained a permanent residence from 1918 until his death in 1964. Unlike many artists who relocated to the American Southwest and incorporated its imagery and scenery into their paintings, Gaspard continued to create paintings of far off places.

"Siberian Sleighriders" from 1921 relates to a two-year excursion to Mongolia, Manchuria, and Siberia. This location was of personal importance to Gaspard. After his marriage to a wealthy American ballerina whom he met in Paris, their honeymoon was a two-year horseback trip through Siberia.

In 1965, the New Mexico Museum of Art held a retrospective exhibition of Gaspard in his memory.
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