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ANSELM KIEFER (b. 1945)

 
"San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation. "San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
<br>
<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
<br>
<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
<br>
<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation.
San Loretto200874 x 111 in. mixed media on canvas
Provenance
Private Collection of the artist
Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Salzburg, Austria
Private Collection, New York
"San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."

The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.

Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself. Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.

In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015. The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation.
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