HENRY MOORE (1898-1986)

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Henry Moore’s “Standing Figure” from 1982, edition 6/9, captures the magnitude of Moore’s characteristic style at an intimate scale. Often drawing inspiration form organic forms such as bones and shells, Moore presented human forms as graceful abstractions – creating non-naturalistic figures that embraced nature all the same. His renowned reclining figures have been compared to rolling landscapes, and his curvilinear works are often informed by the naturally occurring shapes in the wood or stone. This work in bronze is 12 inches tall and an excellent example of Moore’s characteristic blend of figuration and abstraction. Comparable small-scale works have done well at auction in recent years, such as “Maquette for Mother and Child with Apple” from 1956, a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9 that sold for $591,000 in 2017. Similarly, “Head of a Girl” from 1923, also a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9, sold in 2011 for $253,620. “Standing Figure” is signed on the base.Henry Moore’s “Standing Figure” from 1982, edition 6/9, captures the magnitude of Moore’s characteristic style at an intimate scale. Often drawing inspiration form organic forms such as bones and shells, Moore presented human forms as graceful abstractions – creating non-naturalistic figures that embraced nature all the same. His renowned reclining figures have been compared to rolling landscapes, and his curvilinear works are often informed by the naturally occurring shapes in the wood or stone. This work in bronze is 12 inches tall and an excellent example of Moore’s characteristic blend of figuration and abstraction. Comparable small-scale works have done well at auction in recent years, such as “Maquette for Mother and Child with Apple” from 1956, a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9 that sold for $591,000 in 2017. Similarly, “Head of a Girl” from 1923, also a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9, sold in 2011 for $253,620. “Standing Figure” is signed on the base.Henry Moore’s “Standing Figure” from 1982, edition 6/9, captures the magnitude of Moore’s characteristic style at an intimate scale. Often drawing inspiration form organic forms such as bones and shells, Moore presented human forms as graceful abstractions – creating non-naturalistic figures that embraced nature all the same. His renowned reclining figures have been compared to rolling landscapes, and his curvilinear works are often informed by the naturally occurring shapes in the wood or stone. This work in bronze is 12 inches tall and an excellent example of Moore’s characteristic blend of figuration and abstraction. Comparable small-scale works have done well at auction in recent years, such as “Maquette for Mother and Child with Apple” from 1956, a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9 that sold for $591,000 in 2017. Similarly, “Head of a Girl” from 1923, also a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9, sold in 2011 for $253,620. “Standing Figure” is signed on the base.Henry Moore’s “Standing Figure” from 1982, edition 6/9, captures the magnitude of Moore’s characteristic style at an intimate scale. Often drawing inspiration form organic forms such as bones and shells, Moore presented human forms as graceful abstractions – creating non-naturalistic figures that embraced nature all the same. His renowned reclining figures have been compared to rolling landscapes, and his curvilinear works are often informed by the naturally occurring shapes in the wood or stone. This work in bronze is 12 inches tall and an excellent example of Moore’s characteristic blend of figuration and abstraction. Comparable small-scale works have done well at auction in recent years, such as “Maquette for Mother and Child with Apple” from 1956, a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9 that sold for $591,000 in 2017. Similarly, “Head of a Girl” from 1923, also a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9, sold in 2011 for $253,620. “Standing Figure” is signed on the base.Henry Moore’s “Standing Figure” from 1982, edition 6/9, captures the magnitude of Moore’s characteristic style at an intimate scale. Often drawing inspiration form organic forms such as bones and shells, Moore presented human forms as graceful abstractions – creating non-naturalistic figures that embraced nature all the same. His renowned reclining figures have been compared to rolling landscapes, and his curvilinear works are often informed by the naturally occurring shapes in the wood or stone. This work in bronze is 12 inches tall and an excellent example of Moore’s characteristic blend of figuration and abstraction. Comparable small-scale works have done well at auction in recent years, such as “Maquette for Mother and Child with Apple” from 1956, a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9 that sold for $591,000 in 2017. Similarly, “Head of a Girl” from 1923, also a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9, sold in 2011 for $253,620. “Standing Figure” is signed on the base.Henry Moore’s “Standing Figure” from 1982, edition 6/9, captures the magnitude of Moore’s characteristic style at an intimate scale. Often drawing inspiration form organic forms such as bones and shells, Moore presented human forms as graceful abstractions – creating non-naturalistic figures that embraced nature all the same. His renowned reclining figures have been compared to rolling landscapes, and his curvilinear works are often informed by the naturally occurring shapes in the wood or stone. This work in bronze is 12 inches tall and an excellent example of Moore’s characteristic blend of figuration and abstraction. Comparable small-scale works have done well at auction in recent years, such as “Maquette for Mother and Child with Apple” from 1956, a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9 that sold for $591,000 in 2017. Similarly, “Head of a Girl” from 1923, also a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9, sold in 2011 for $253,620. “Standing Figure” is signed on the base.Henry Moore’s “Standing Figure” from 1982, edition 6/9, captures the magnitude of Moore’s characteristic style at an intimate scale. Often drawing inspiration form organic forms such as bones and shells, Moore presented human forms as graceful abstractions – creating non-naturalistic figures that embraced nature all the same. His renowned reclining figures have been compared to rolling landscapes, and his curvilinear works are often informed by the naturally occurring shapes in the wood or stone. This work in bronze is 12 inches tall and an excellent example of Moore’s characteristic blend of figuration and abstraction. Comparable small-scale works have done well at auction in recent years, such as “Maquette for Mother and Child with Apple” from 1956, a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9 that sold for $591,000 in 2017. Similarly, “Head of a Girl” from 1923, also a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9, sold in 2011 for $253,620. “Standing Figure” is signed on the base.
Standing Figure198212 x 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. bronze and wood
Description
Henry Moore’s “Standing Figure” from 1982, edition 6/9, captures the magnitude of Moore’s characteristic style at an intimate scale. Often drawing inspiration form organic forms such as bones and shells, Moore presented human forms as graceful abstractions – creating non-naturalistic figures that embraced nature all the same. His renowned reclining figures have been compared to rolling landscapes, and his curvilinear works are often informed by the naturally occurring shapes in the wood or stone. This work in bronze is 12 inches tall and an excellent example of Moore’s characteristic blend of figuration and abstraction. Comparable small-scale works have done well at auction in recent years, such as “Maquette for Mother and Child with Apple” from 1956, a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9 that sold for $591,000 in 2017. Similarly, “Head of a Girl” from 1923, also a 7-inch bronze from an edition of 9, sold in 2011 for $253,620. “Standing Figure” is signed on the base.

125,000