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SAM FRANCIS (1923-1994)

 
After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme. After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme.
New York, New York195939 3/4 x 27 in. gouache/egg tempera on gessoed French paper
Provenance
Estate of Sam Francis
Literature
Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles 1997 (Exhibition catalog with color illustration on page 17)
After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting. Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme.
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