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DAMIEN HIRST (b. 1965)

 
A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007. A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
<br>
<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
<br>
<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007.
Overwhelming Love200836 x 60 in(91.44 x 152.4 cm) household gloss, butterflies
Provenance
Sotheby’s, London, Damien Hirst - Beautiful Inside My Head Forever, September 16, 2008 lot 140
Private Collection, acquired from above sale
Private Collection, California
A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum.

Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”

Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007.
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