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HELEN FRANKENTHALER (1928-2011)

 
One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.
<br>
<br>In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.
<br>
<br>Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
Terracotta198268 1/4 x 61 3/4 in.(173.36 x 156.85 cm) acrylic on canvas
Provenance
with John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco
Private Collection, California, 1982
One of the most recognizable names among the Abstract Expressionist women, Helen Frankenthaler made significant contributions to American Post-War painting. Her use of staining pigment directly on canvas gave way to the Color Field movement. By pouring paint on raw canvas, Frankenthaler fused the pigment into the very fabric, drawing attention to the nature of paint and color.

In this painting from 1982, Frankenthaler mixes the surface of the canvas with thick use impasto, showcasing her ability to mix color and textures. The sprays of blue and red impasto against the tonal changes of the stained canvas create dynamic depth. "Terracotta" has never been to auction and has belonged to the same private collection since 1982.

Having exhibited her work for over six decades, from the early 1950s until her death in 2011, Frankenthaler spanned several generations of abstract painters while continuing to produce vital and ever-changing new work. Her work has been the subject of several major retrospective exhibitions, including a 1989 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
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