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PAUL JENKINS (1923-2012)

 
Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
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<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united. Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
<br>
<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united.
Untitledc. 197071 1/2 x 128 1/2 in.(181.61 x 326.39 cm) acrylic on canvas
Provenance
Estate of HH Shams Pahlavi, Santa Barbara, California
Heritage Auctions Texas: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 [Lot 64030] Modern & Contemporary Art Signature Auction
Private Collection, Los Angeles
Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.

Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united.
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