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FORREST MYERS (b. 1941)

 
Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania. Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."
<br>
<br>In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time.  The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer. 
<br>
<br>Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania.
Pompeii200637 x 33 x 64 in.(93.98 x 83.82 x 162.56 cm) stainless steel
Provenance
Hedge Gallery, San Francisco, November 2008
Private Collection, California
Exhibition
Friedman Benda, New York. "Forrest Myers", November 8 – December 20, 2007
Hedge, San Francisco, California. "Not Furniture : Forrest Myers", October 7 – November 8, 2008
 

150,000

Forrest "Frosty" Myers's deep connection to Jazz music is evident in the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his sculptural work. His sculptures are an interesting juxtaposition of structure and whimsical tangents. In a recent interview, Myers explains how his sculpture "tries to make the future visible…to make metal into something more ephemeral, turn matter into spirit."

In his 2006 sculpture, "Pompeii," Myers uses his masterful metalwork skill to depict what appears to be a reclining figure, whose outline is frozen in time. The sculpture is not a dark interpretation of a tragic historical event but a slightly ambiguous and thought-provoking creation for the contemporary viewer.

Myers's works are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of Art in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Myers lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Damascus, Pennsylvania.
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