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EDGAR DEGAS (1834-1917)

 
"Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
<br>
<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
<br>
<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others. "Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
<br>
<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
<br>
<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others. "Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
<br>
<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
<br>
<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others. "Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
<br>
<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
<br>
<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others. "Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
<br>
<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
<br>
<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others. "Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
<br>
<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
<br>
<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others. "Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
<br>
<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
<br>
<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others. "Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
<br>
<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
<br>
<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others.
Femme Debout et vue de Face Agrafant son Corset188335 1/8 x 21 3/4 in. oil on canvas
Provenance
Estate of the artist, sold: Galerie George Petit, Paris, Atelier Edgar Degas, deuxième vente, December 11-13, 1918, lot 22
Ambroise Vollard, Paris
Zoller, Warsaw
Paul Guillaume, Paris
Mrs. J Paul Guillaume, Paris, by descent from the above
Emile Roche, Paris, acquired from the above on June 11, 1937
Private Collection, by descent from the above
Christie’s New York, Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale, November 6, 2007, lot 16
Private Collection
Literature
Paul-André Lemoisne, Degas et son oeuvre, vol. III, Paris, 1946, no. 741, illustrated p. 421
Franco Russoli and Fiorella Minervino, L’opera complete di Degas, Milan, 1970, no. 880, illustrated p. 126
"Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years.

Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard.

Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others.
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