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GEORGE RICKEY (1907-2002)

 
“One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others. “One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others. “One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others. “One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others. “One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others. “One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others. “One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others. “One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others. “One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
<br>
<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
<br>
<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others.
One Up One Down Oblique197420 x 19 x 2 1/2 in.(50.8 x 48.26 x 6.35 cm) bronze
Provenance
Staempfli Gallery, New York
Private Collection, 1975
Sale, Christie's New York, Post-War and Contemporary Art, 28 September 2016, lot 89
Private Collection, California

95,000

“One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist. In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters). Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.

A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.

Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others.
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