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CHRISTOPHER WOOL (b. 1955)

 
Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
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<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself. Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
<br>
<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself. Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
<br>
<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself. Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
<br>
<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself. Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
<br>
<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself. Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
<br>
<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself. Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
<br>
<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself. Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
<br>
<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself. Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
<br>
<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself.
Untitled (T8)198712 x 12 in.(30.48 x 30.48 cm) alkyd and flashe on aluminum on board
Provenance
Mark Moore Gallery, Santa Monica
Sale, Phillips New York, Contemporary Art Day, 16 May 2014, lot 158
Private Collection, Omaha

245,000

Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.

“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself.
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