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KENNETH NOLAND (1924-2010)

 
‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. ‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
<br>
<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
<br>
<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio.
Set 1979197934 1/4 x 94 1/4 in.(90.17 x 238.76 cm) acrylic on canvas
Provenance
Hokin Gallery, Palm Beach
Butterfield’s San Francisco, May 9, 2001
Private Collection, California
‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).

Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).

First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio.
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