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RICHARD LONG (b. 1945)

 
Among the best-known British land artists, Richard Long is the only artist to have been short-listed four times for the Turner Prize. He was a nominee in 1984, 1987, 1988, and won the prize in 1989 for White “Water Line.” Long has described his practice as "a balance between the patterns of nature and formalism of human, abstract ideas of lines and circles.” Going on to say, “It is where my human characteristics meet the natural forces and patterns of the world, and that is really the kind of subject of my work." 
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<br>The starting point for his sculpture is a walk over terrain. Since the mid-1960s, Long’s walking practice has taken him to the Sahara Desert, Australia, Iceland, and all around his home in Bristol, England. The memory of the event of a hike, a topographic feature for instance, is carried forward in his sculptures. Photography, text, and maps of the landscapes he has walked are also an important part of his practice, and sometimes he creates his sculptures within the landscape from rocks or other natural materials and photographs them. In “Georgia Granite Line,” Long uses the typical white granite of the U.S. state, which has been sought after since the early 19th century for its color. Among the best-known British land artists, Richard Long is the only artist to have been short-listed four times for the Turner Prize. He was a nominee in 1984, 1987, 1988, and won the prize in 1989 for White “Water Line.” Long has described his practice as "a balance between the patterns of nature and formalism of human, abstract ideas of lines and circles.” Going on to say, “It is where my human characteristics meet the natural forces and patterns of the world, and that is really the kind of subject of my work." 
<br>
<br>The starting point for his sculpture is a walk over terrain. Since the mid-1960s, Long’s walking practice has taken him to the Sahara Desert, Australia, Iceland, and all around his home in Bristol, England. The memory of the event of a hike, a topographic feature for instance, is carried forward in his sculptures. Photography, text, and maps of the landscapes he has walked are also an important part of his practice, and sometimes he creates his sculptures within the landscape from rocks or other natural materials and photographs them. In “Georgia Granite Line,” Long uses the typical white granite of the U.S. state, which has been sought after since the early 19th century for its color. Among the best-known British land artists, Richard Long is the only artist to have been short-listed four times for the Turner Prize. He was a nominee in 1984, 1987, 1988, and won the prize in 1989 for White “Water Line.” Long has described his practice as "a balance between the patterns of nature and formalism of human, abstract ideas of lines and circles.” Going on to say, “It is where my human characteristics meet the natural forces and patterns of the world, and that is really the kind of subject of my work." 
<br>
<br>The starting point for his sculpture is a walk over terrain. Since the mid-1960s, Long’s walking practice has taken him to the Sahara Desert, Australia, Iceland, and all around his home in Bristol, England. The memory of the event of a hike, a topographic feature for instance, is carried forward in his sculptures. Photography, text, and maps of the landscapes he has walked are also an important part of his practice, and sometimes he creates his sculptures within the landscape from rocks or other natural materials and photographs them. In “Georgia Granite Line,” Long uses the typical white granite of the U.S. state, which has been sought after since the early 19th century for its color. Among the best-known British land artists, Richard Long is the only artist to have been short-listed four times for the Turner Prize. He was a nominee in 1984, 1987, 1988, and won the prize in 1989 for White “Water Line.” Long has described his practice as "a balance between the patterns of nature and formalism of human, abstract ideas of lines and circles.” Going on to say, “It is where my human characteristics meet the natural forces and patterns of the world, and that is really the kind of subject of my work." 
<br>
<br>The starting point for his sculpture is a walk over terrain. Since the mid-1960s, Long’s walking practice has taken him to the Sahara Desert, Australia, Iceland, and all around his home in Bristol, England. The memory of the event of a hike, a topographic feature for instance, is carried forward in his sculptures. Photography, text, and maps of the landscapes he has walked are also an important part of his practice, and sometimes he creates his sculptures within the landscape from rocks or other natural materials and photographs them. In “Georgia Granite Line,” Long uses the typical white granite of the U.S. state, which has been sought after since the early 19th century for its color. Among the best-known British land artists, Richard Long is the only artist to have been short-listed four times for the Turner Prize. He was a nominee in 1984, 1987, 1988, and won the prize in 1989 for White “Water Line.” Long has described his practice as "a balance between the patterns of nature and formalism of human, abstract ideas of lines and circles.” Going on to say, “It is where my human characteristics meet the natural forces and patterns of the world, and that is really the kind of subject of my work." 
<br>
<br>The starting point for his sculpture is a walk over terrain. Since the mid-1960s, Long’s walking practice has taken him to the Sahara Desert, Australia, Iceland, and all around his home in Bristol, England. The memory of the event of a hike, a topographic feature for instance, is carried forward in his sculptures. Photography, text, and maps of the landscapes he has walked are also an important part of his practice, and sometimes he creates his sculptures within the landscape from rocks or other natural materials and photographs them. In “Georgia Granite Line,” Long uses the typical white granite of the U.S. state, which has been sought after since the early 19th century for its color. Among the best-known British land artists, Richard Long is the only artist to have been short-listed four times for the Turner Prize. He was a nominee in 1984, 1987, 1988, and won the prize in 1989 for White “Water Line.” Long has described his practice as "a balance between the patterns of nature and formalism of human, abstract ideas of lines and circles.” Going on to say, “It is where my human characteristics meet the natural forces and patterns of the world, and that is really the kind of subject of my work." 
<br>
<br>The starting point for his sculpture is a walk over terrain. Since the mid-1960s, Long’s walking practice has taken him to the Sahara Desert, Australia, Iceland, and all around his home in Bristol, England. The memory of the event of a hike, a topographic feature for instance, is carried forward in his sculptures. Photography, text, and maps of the landscapes he has walked are also an important part of his practice, and sometimes he creates his sculptures within the landscape from rocks or other natural materials and photographs them. In “Georgia Granite Line,” Long uses the typical white granite of the U.S. state, which has been sought after since the early 19th century for its color.
Georgia Granite Line199022 x 34 x 234 in.(55.88 x 86.36 x 594.36 cm) white granite
Provenance
Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York
Toby Schreiber, San Francisco
Gian Enzo Sperone and Galerie Cardi
Sale, Phillip's de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art, October 14, 2006, lot 48
Private Collection, California
 
Exhibition
Center for Contemporary Art, Cleveland 1993. Richard Long, Georgia Granite Line.
Literature
Galleria Cardi, ed., Good News Galleria Cardi, Italy, 2002, no. 2 (illustrated)
Price250,000
Among the best-known British land artists, Richard Long is the only artist to have been short-listed four times for the Turner Prize. He was a nominee in 1984, 1987, 1988, and won the prize in 1989 for White “Water Line.” Long has described his practice as "a balance between the patterns of nature and formalism of human, abstract ideas of lines and circles.” Going on to say, “It is where my human characteristics meet the natural forces and patterns of the world, and that is really the kind of subject of my work."

The starting point for his sculpture is a walk over terrain. Since the mid-1960s, Long’s walking practice has taken him to the Sahara Desert, Australia, Iceland, and all around his home in Bristol, England. The memory of the event of a hike, a topographic feature for instance, is carried forward in his sculptures. Photography, text, and maps of the landscapes he has walked are also an important part of his practice, and sometimes he creates his sculptures within the landscape from rocks or other natural materials and photographs them. In “Georgia Granite Line,” Long uses the typical white granite of the U.S. state, which has been sought after since the early 19th century for its color.
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