MAX PELLEGRINI (b. 1945)

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From the late 1990’s to the early 2000’s, Pellegrini returned to his paintings in the Life of an Anarchist series, “reworked them, constructed them in ‘layers,’ corrected them, initiated series or returned to iconographies of his past works.” These paintings, which are dedicated to Pellegrini’s wife Roberta, depict a woman who is free and positive, and are part of a long line of works in which there is an absolute female protagonist. (Sara D’Alessandro, “Biography,” in Max Pellegrini, ed. Danilo Eccher, 2014). Pellegrini had his wife in mind for these paintings, since “she considers herself an integrated anarchist, a woman with no prejudice but not fanatical or destructive.”
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<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomFrom the late 1990’s to the early 2000’s, Pellegrini returned to his paintings in the Life of an Anarchist series, “reworked them, constructed them in ‘layers,’ corrected them, initiated series or returned to iconographies of his past works.” These paintings, which are dedicated to Pellegrini’s wife Roberta, depict a woman who is free and positive, and are part of a long line of works in which there is an absolute female protagonist. (Sara D’Alessandro, “Biography,” in Max Pellegrini, ed. Danilo Eccher, 2014). Pellegrini had his wife in mind for these paintings, since “she considers herself an integrated anarchist, a woman with no prejudice but not fanatical or destructive.”
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomFrom the late 1990’s to the early 2000’s, Pellegrini returned to his paintings in the Life of an Anarchist series, “reworked them, constructed them in ‘layers,’ corrected them, initiated series or returned to iconographies of his past works.” These paintings, which are dedicated to Pellegrini’s wife Roberta, depict a woman who is free and positive, and are part of a long line of works in which there is an absolute female protagonist. (Sara D’Alessandro, “Biography,” in Max Pellegrini, ed. Danilo Eccher, 2014). Pellegrini had his wife in mind for these paintings, since “she considers herself an integrated anarchist, a woman with no prejudice but not fanatical or destructive.”
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomFrom the late 1990’s to the early 2000’s, Pellegrini returned to his paintings in the Life of an Anarchist series, “reworked them, constructed them in ‘layers,’ corrected them, initiated series or returned to iconographies of his past works.” These paintings, which are dedicated to Pellegrini’s wife Roberta, depict a woman who is free and positive, and are part of a long line of works in which there is an absolute female protagonist. (Sara D’Alessandro, “Biography,” in Max Pellegrini, ed. Danilo Eccher, 2014). Pellegrini had his wife in mind for these paintings, since “she considers herself an integrated anarchist, a woman with no prejudice but not fanatical or destructive.”
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomFrom the late 1990’s to the early 2000’s, Pellegrini returned to his paintings in the Life of an Anarchist series, “reworked them, constructed them in ‘layers,’ corrected them, initiated series or returned to iconographies of his past works.” These paintings, which are dedicated to Pellegrini’s wife Roberta, depict a woman who is free and positive, and are part of a long line of works in which there is an absolute female protagonist. (Sara D’Alessandro, “Biography,” in Max Pellegrini, ed. Danilo Eccher, 2014). Pellegrini had his wife in mind for these paintings, since “she considers herself an integrated anarchist, a woman with no prejudice but not fanatical or destructive.”
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomFrom the late 1990’s to the early 2000’s, Pellegrini returned to his paintings in the Life of an Anarchist series, “reworked them, constructed them in ‘layers,’ corrected them, initiated series or returned to iconographies of his past works.” These paintings, which are dedicated to Pellegrini’s wife Roberta, depict a woman who is free and positive, and are part of a long line of works in which there is an absolute female protagonist. (Sara D’Alessandro, “Biography,” in Max Pellegrini, ed. Danilo Eccher, 2014). Pellegrini had his wife in mind for these paintings, since “she considers herself an integrated anarchist, a woman with no prejudice but not fanatical or destructive.”
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomFrom the late 1990’s to the early 2000’s, Pellegrini returned to his paintings in the Life of an Anarchist series, “reworked them, constructed them in ‘layers,’ corrected them, initiated series or returned to iconographies of his past works.” These paintings, which are dedicated to Pellegrini’s wife Roberta, depict a woman who is free and positive, and are part of a long line of works in which there is an absolute female protagonist. (Sara D’Alessandro, “Biography,” in Max Pellegrini, ed. Danilo Eccher, 2014). Pellegrini had his wife in mind for these paintings, since “she considers herself an integrated anarchist, a woman with no prejudice but not fanatical or destructive.”
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip Tom
Vita di un’anarchica: la scelta1997-200951 x 63 in. oil on canvas
Description
From the late 1990’s to the early 2000’s, Pellegrini returned to his paintings in the Life of an Anarchist series, “reworked them, constructed them in ‘layers,’ corrected them, initiated series or returned to iconographies of his past works.” These paintings, which are dedicated to Pellegrini’s wife Roberta, depict a woman who is free and positive, and are part of a long line of works in which there is an absolute female protagonist. (Sara D’Alessandro, “Biography,” in Max Pellegrini, ed. Danilo Eccher, 2014). Pellegrini had his wife in mind for these paintings, since “she considers herself an integrated anarchist, a woman with no prejudice but not fanatical or destructive.”

- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip Tom

57,000