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ALFRED SISLEY (1839-1899)

 
Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery. Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.
<br>
<br>Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance. 
<br>
<br>Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling. 
<br>
<br>Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery.
Printemps a Veneux188028 3/4 x 35 3/4 in.(73.03 x 90.81 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
Galerie Durand-Ruel et Cie., Paris (acquired from the artist, by August 1891)
Paul Durand-Ruel, Paris (acquired from the above, 1901)
Private collection, Paris (by descent from the above, by 1959)
Galerie Durand-Ruel et Cie., Paris (acquired from the above, 16 January 1962)
Sam Salz, Inc., New York (acquired from the above, 23 January 1962)
Stephen Richard and Audrey Currier (by 1967)
Estate sale, Christie's, New York, 16 May 1984, lot 18
Howard B. Keck, Los Angeles (acquired at the above sale)
Soth
...More...eby's, New York, 6 November 1991, lot 4
Sale, Christies's New York, 8 May 2013
Richard Green Gallery, London
Private Collection, acquired from the above
Private Collection, Wyoming
Private Collection, Florida
Exhibition
Paris, Galerie Durand-Ruel et Cie., Exposition de tableaux de Monet, Pissarro, Renoir & Sisley, April 1899, no. 134 (titled Le Printemps and dated 1878).
Paris, Chambre Syndicale de la Curiosite? des Beaux-Arts, L'art franc?ais au service de la Science franc?aise: exposition d'oeuvres d'art des XVIIIe?, XIXe? et XXe? sie?cles, April-May 1923, no. 224 (titled Printemps and dated 1878).
Paris, Muse?e des arts de?coratifs, Cinquante ans de peinture franc?aise, 1875-1925, May-July 1925, no. 75 (titled Les pommiers en fleurs and dated 1882).
Paris, Galerie Durand-Ruel et Cie., Tableaux de Sisley, February-March 1930, no. 7 (titled Paysage and dated 1872).
Paris, Galerie Durand-Ruel et Cie., Exposition de tableaux par Alfred Sisley, January-February 1937, no. 29 (dated 1882).
Literature
G. Geffroy, Sisley, Paris, 1923 (illustrated, pl. 8; titled Le Printemps)
G. Geffroy, Sisley, Paris, 1927 (illustrated, pl. 24)
J. Jedlicka, Sisley, Bern, 1949, p. 30, no. 22 (illustrated, pl. 22; titled Fru?hling)
V. Gilardoni, L'Impressionismo, Milan, 1951, p. 152, no. 43 (illustrated, pl. 43; titled Primavera and dated 1878
F. Daulte, Alfred Sisley: Catalogue raisonne? de l'oeuvre peint, Lausanne, 1959, no. 356 (illustrated; with incorrect provenance)
...LESS...
Alongside Monet and Renoir, Sisley was a founding member of Impressionism and remained true to the principles of pure color, rendering fleeting moments and capturing the essence of atmosphere throughout his career. Unlike many of his contemporaries who traversed varied subjects of industrial urbanism, rural locals and figures, Sisley was enamored with the French countryside and focused almost entirely on this subject.

Painting en plein air, directly onto a primed canvas outdoors, Sisley rarely reworked his paintings back in his studio. This mode of painting brings an immediacy to his work, particularly in “Printemps a Veneux.” He painted this piece in April of 1880 in Veneux-Nadon, a small village along the west bank of the Seine river. Sisley had settled in this area three months prior, focusing on painting the snow-covered landscape. As Spring began to bloom, Sisley was charmed by the environment in which he found himself and his paintings took on a renewed sense of exuberance.

Cerulean skies with plush white clouds prevail in many of Sisley’s paintings. The crisp Spring air rustling the leaves of the orchard in which Sisley placed his easel shifts the light across the grove, creating delightful patterns of shadow. The atmosphere of “Printemps a Veneux” is palpable. The large scale of the canvas is rare in Sisley oeuvre and enhances the immersive feeling.

Two years after Sisley painted this work, Impressionist champion and patron Paul Durand-Ruel acquired the painting from the artist and was so delighted with it that he kept it in his private collection for decades. Three years after Sisley’s death, Durand-Ruel finally exhibited “Printemps a Veneux” in an important 1899 Impressionist exhibition in his Parisian gallery.
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“I always start a painting with the sky.” -Alfred Sisley

History

A pioneer of French Impressionism, Alfred Sisley played an important role in the movement and developed his own visual language, receiving renewed interest and appreciation in recent years. His works speak across time because of his unique artistic vision.

In 1863, Sisley painted with Monet and Auguste Renoir en plein air (painting outdoors), and the experience changed the trajectory of his process. Landscapes make up the vast majority of Sisley’s oeuvre, yet despite landscapes and painting en plein air being synonymous with Impressionism, most scholarly attention has been on his fellow artists’ paintings of middle-class life. Their examinations of urban life, industrialization, and an expanding middle class has captured the attention and imagination of academics. It is this emphasis on landscape within Sisley’s body of work that separates him from the other impressionists. Paradoxically, it has both limited the study into Sisley and marked him, along with Monet, as chief representative of Impressionism.

More
  • History_5
    Alfred Sisley, Rue Eugène Moussoir at Moret: Winter 1891
  • History_4
    Alfred Sisley, Moret, bords du Loing, 1892
  • History_3
    Alfred Sisley, Windy Day at Véneux’, 1882
  • History_2
    Alfred Sisley, The Small Meadows in Spring, 1880
  • History_1
    Alfred Sisley, The Road from Moret to Saint-Mammès, 1883–85

Sisley Paintings at Auction

“Effet de Neige à Louveciennes” (1874), oil on canvas, 21 ¼ x 25 1/2 in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 1 March 2017 for $9,065,000
“Effet de Neige à Louveciennes” (1874), oil on canvas, 21 ¼ x 25 1/2 in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 1 March 2017 for $9,065,000
  • Set the record price for Sisley at auction in 2017
  • Smaller with a more muted color palette, but beautiful shadows
  • Sisley’s winter landscapes are extremely rare and desirable
“Le loing à Moret, en été” (1891), oil on canvas, 29 x 36 1/2 in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 5 February 2007 for $5,746,000
“Le loing à Moret, en été” (1891), oil on canvas, 29 x 36 1/2 in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 5 February 2007 for $5,746,000
  • Same size with a similar color palette, composition, and sky
  • Like our painting, it includes a figure, which increases the value
“Moret au Coucher du Soleil, Octobre” (1888), oil on canvas, 29 x 36 1/2 in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 5 November 2015 for $4,954,000
“Moret au Coucher du Soleil, Octobre” (1888), oil on canvas, 29 x 36 1/2 in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 5 November 2015 for $4,954,000
  • Same size with a similar composition, color palette, and tiny figures
  • Sold six years ago for nearly $5M
“Le loing à Moret” (1883), oil on canvas, 20 x 26in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 4 November 2014 for $4,869,000
“Le loing à Moret” (1883), oil on canvas, 20 x 26in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 4 November 2014 for $4,869,000
  • Significantly smaller than our piece and less highly finished, but has beautiful light and a similar color palette
  • No figures
  • Sold for over $4.8M seven years ago
“Moret-sur-Loing” (1891), oil on canvas, 25.6 x 36.2 in. (65 x 92 cm). Sold at Sotheby’s London: 5 February 2008 for $4,685,031 USD
“Moret-sur-Loing” (1891), oil on canvas, 25.6 x 36.2 in. (65 x 92 cm). Sold at Sotheby’s London: 5 February 2008 for $4,685,031 USD
  • Though a different subject and composition, this is a comparable large-scale piece
  • Large Sisley paintings are rare and more valuable
  • Sold eight years ago for over $4.6M
“Bords du loing près de moret” (1892), oil on canvas, 28.7 x 36.2 in. (73 x 92 cm). Sold at Sotheby’s London: 19 June 2013 for $4,512,367 USD
“Bords du loing près de moret” (1892), oil on canvas, 28.7 x 36.2 in. (73 x 92 cm). Sold at Sotheby’s London: 19 June 2013 for $4,512,367 USD
  • Same size and very similar composition, sky, and texture
  • Also includes small figures
  • Sold for over $4.5M more than 8 years ago, and the Sisley market has grown
“Le Loing à Moret” (1886), oil on canvas, 21.4 x 28.9 in. (54.4 x 73.5 cm). Sold at Christie’s London: 18 June 2007 for $4,257,575 USD
“Le Loing à Moret” (1886), oil on canvas, 21.4 x 28.9 in. (54.4 x 73.5 cm). Sold at Christie’s London: 18 June 2007 for $4,257,575 USD
  • A little more than half the size of our painting, but has a similar color palette and light with a beautiful sky
  • No figures
“Les peupliers à Moret-sur-Loing, après midi d’août” (1888), oil on canvas, 23.7 x 28.8 in. (60.2 x 73.2 cm). Sold at Christie’s New York: 8 May 2018 for $4,212,500 USD
“Les peupliers à Moret-sur-Loing, après midi d’août” (1888), oil on canvas, 23.7 x 28.8 in. (60.2 x 73.2 cm). Sold at Christie’s New York: 8 May 2018 for $4,212,500 USD
  • About 2/3 the size of our painting with a very similar composition and palette
  • It sold for over $4.2M in 2018 against an estimate of $2-3M

Paintings in Museum Collections

“Lisière de forêt au printemps” (1885), oil on canvas, 23.8 x 28.9 in. (60.5 x 73.5 cm), Musée d’Orsay, Paris
“Lisière de forêt au printemps” (1885), oil on canvas, 23.8 x 28.9 in. (60.5 x 73.5 cm), Musée d’Orsay, Paris
“Banks of the Loing River” (1885), oil on canvas, 21 11/16 x 28 7/8 in. (55.1 x 73.3 cm), Philadelphia Museum of Art
“Banks of the Loing River” (1885), oil on canvas, 21 11/16 x 28 7/8 in. (55.1 x 73.3 cm), Philadelphia Museum of Art
“A la lisière du bois / Paysage. Printemps” (1885), oil on canvas, 20.8 x 28.3 in. (53 x 72 cm), Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium
“A la lisière du bois / Paysage. Printemps” (1885), oil on canvas, 20.8 x 28.3 in. (53 x 72 cm), Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium
“The Meadow at Veneux-Nadon” (1881), oil on canvas, 23.6 x 31.8 in. (60 x 81 cm), Museum Barberini, Potsdam, Germany
“The Meadow at Veneux-Nadon” (1881), oil on canvas, 23.6 x 31.8 in. (60 x 81 cm), Museum Barberini, Potsdam, Germany

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