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FRIDA KAHLO (1907-1954)

 
FRIDA KAHLO - Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht") - oil on masonite - 11 1/4 x 14 1/8 in. FRIDA KAHLO - Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht") - oil on masonite - 11 1/4 x 14 1/8 in. FRIDA KAHLO - Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht") - oil on masonite - 11 1/4 x 14 1/8 in. FRIDA KAHLO - Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht") - oil on masonite - 11 1/4 x 14 1/8 in. FRIDA KAHLO - Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht") - oil on masonite - 11 1/4 x 14 1/8 in. FRIDA KAHLO - Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht") - oil on masonite - 11 1/4 x 14 1/8 in. FRIDA KAHLO - Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht") - oil on masonite - 11 1/4 x 14 1/8 in. FRIDA KAHLO - Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht") - oil on masonite - 11 1/4 x 14 1/8 in.
Still Life ("I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht")195111 1/4 x 14 1/8 in. oil on masonite
Provenance
Dr. Samuel Fastlicht, gifted from artist as payment
Private Collection, United States
Exhibition
Mexico City, Mexico, Galeria Arvil. Cinco mujeres: Leonora Carrington, María Izquierdo, Frida Kahlo, Alice Rahon, Remedios Varo. 1995.
Japan, The Bunkamura Museum of Art, Tokyo, Japan; Suntory Museum, Osaka, Japan; Nagoya City Art Museum, Nagoya, Japan; The Museum of Art, Kochi, Japan. Women Surrealists in Mexico, 2003–2004.
Villeneuve-d'Ascq, France, Musée d'art moderne de Lille metropole. Mexique-Europe: Allers-Retours 1910-1960, 2004.
...More... London, United Kingdom, Tate Modern. Frida Kahlo. June 9 – October 9, 2005
Puerto Rico, Museo de Arte de Ponce. Frida Kahlo y sus mundos. Nov 19, 2005 – Feb 26, 2006.
Hamburg, German, Bucerius Kunst Forum. Frida Kahlo, 2006.
Minneapolis, USA, Walker Art Center. Frida Kahlo. Oct 27, 2007–Jun 14, 2008
Manchester, United Kingdom, Manchester Art Gallery. Angels of Anarchy: Women Artists and Surrealism,  Sept 26, 2009 – Jan 10, 2010
Berlin, Germany, Gropius Bau. Frida Kahlo: Retrospective, April 30 to August 9, 2010
Germany, Kunsthalle Würth. Mexicanidad : Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo, Francisco Toeldo, Adolfo Riestra. April 28 – Sept 16, 2012
Ontario, Canada, Art Gallery of Ontario. Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics and Painting. Oct 20, 2012 – Jan 20, 2013.
Paris, France, Musée de l'Orangerie. Frida Kahlo/ Diego Rivera. L’art en fusion. Oct 09, 2013 – Jan 13, 2014.
New York, USA, New York Botanical Garden. Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life. May 16 – Nov 1, 2015.
Saint Petersburg, Russia, Faberge Museum. Frida Kahlo: Paintings and Graphic Art From Mexican Collections. Feb 03 – April 30, 2016
Seoul, South Korea, Seoul Arts Center. Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. May 28 – Aug 28, 2016.
Paris, France, Grand Palais. México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde. Oct 6, 2016 – Jan 23, 2017
Dallas, USA, Dallas Museum of Art. México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde. March 12 – July 16, 2017.
Dallas, USA, Dallas Museum of Art. Frida Kahlo: Five Works. March 7 – June 20, 2021
UPCOMING: Assen, Netherlands, Drents Museum. Viva la Frida! Oct 8, 2021 – March 27, 2022
Literature
Zamora, Martha, Frida, El Pincel de la Angusta. Mexico. 1987, p. 358.
Grimberg, Kettenmann, Prignitz-Poda, Helga. Frida Kahlo: Das Gesamtwerk. Frankfurt: Verl Neue Kritik, 1988, p. 168.
Herrera, Hayden. Frida Kahlo: The Paintings. México. 1991, p. 205.
Herrera, Hayden. Frida Kahlo Die Gemalde. Germany. 1992, p. 112.
Glusberg, Jorge.  Das Vanguardas Ao Fim Do Milenio. Portugal. 1999, p. 71.
Nonaka, Masayo and Hirome Sone. Women Surrealists in Mexico. Japan. 2003, p. 96.
Fauchereau, Serge et al. Mexique-Europe: Allers-Retours 1910-1960. France. 2004, p. 96.
Arteaga, Agustin, Nadia Ugalde Gomez and Juan Rafael Coronel Rivera . Frida Kahlo y sus mundos. Puerto Rico. 2005, p. 37.
Dexter, Emma. Frida Kahlo. London: Tate Modern. 2005, p. 168.
Muller, Karsten and Ortrud Westheider. Frida Kahlo. Germany, p. 137.
Zamora, Martha. Frida, El Pincel de la Angustia. México: Marta Zamora, 2007, p. 360.
Grimberg, Solomon. Frida Kahlo – The Still Lifes. Merrell, USA. 2008, p. 105
Carpenter, Elizabeth. Frida Kahlo. Minneapolis, Walker Art Center. 2007, p. 218.
Allmer, Patricia. Angels of Anarchy: Women Artists and Surrealism. Prestel, London. 2008, p. 141.
Prignitz-Poda, et al. Frida Kahlo: Retrospective. Prestel, Munich, New York. 2010, p. 173.
Tuer, Dot and Elliot King. Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics and Painting. Art Gallery of Ontario, Canada. 2013, p. 75.
Weber, C. Sylvia and Kunsthalle Wurth. Mexicanidad : Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo, Francisco Toeldo, Adolfo Riestra. Swiridoff, Germany. 2012, p. 62
Vial, Marie-Pauel. Frida Kahlo et Diego Rivera. L'art en fusion. Hazan, France. 2013, p. 126.
Todo el Universo Frida Kahlo El Mundo México, Vogue Mexico y Latinoamerico, Mexico. 2013, p. 127.
Zavala, Adriana and Robert Bye. Frida Kahlo’s Garden. Prestel, USA. 2015, p. 79.
Arteaga, Agustin. México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde. Dallas Museum of Art. 2017, p. 149.
Kahlo, F., In Lozano, L.-M., & Taschen, B. (2021). Frida Kahlo: The complete paintings.
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“Painting completed my life.” – Frida Kahlo

History

Few artists have had an impact on so many facets of our culture as Frida Kahlo. Kahlo occupies not only art history but popular culture, easily identifiable as any Hollywood actor or pop star. However, the mythology constructed over the years since her passing have both built and obscured the power Kahlo possessed and the complex expressions in her paintings.

Kahlo lived a turbulent life, diagnosed with polio at six years old and injured in a bus accident at nineteen that forever altered her and caused her to undergo surgeries for the rest of life. Kahlo wryly noted that she suffered two accidents in her life, the first was the bus and the second was meeting her husband, Diego Rivera. Their intense and stormy relationship gave them both support and inspiration as well as anguish.

It was through all this that Kahlo found the reserve to paint. Not strictly a Surrealist as so many assume, Kahlo actively rejected the label, acutely noting that she did not pull from her unconscious or dreams – she pulled from her lived reality. Kahlo developed her own personal visual language to communicate her own experiences. It is from this highly subjective stance that Kahlo was able to create works that could be universally understood. As German theorist Theodor noted, the subjective becomes universal.

Even in her still lifes, Kahlo painted from her own reality. Kahlo has always been in dialogue with art history. With her still life, Kahlo joins a storied tradition including the Golden Age Dutch and Netherlandish painters who included memento mori even amongst beautiful displays. Memento mori is a Latin phrase describing the symbolic reminder of death’s inevitability. Who else would comprehend the fragility of life as well as Frida Kahlo?

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  • Kahlo39379_history1
    Frida Kahlo photographed by her father, 1932
  • Kahlo39379_history2
    Frida Kahlo, “Weeping Coconuts (Cocos gimientes)”, 1951, oil on board, Frame: 14 x 16 ¾ in., Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Kahlo used this same weeping effect in “Still Life (‘I Belong to Samuel Fastlight’)”
  • Kahlo39379_history3
    Frida Kahlo, “Still Life with Parrot and Flag”, 1951, oil on Masonite, 11 x 15 ¾ in.
  • Kahlo39379_history4
    Frida Kahlo, “Self-Portrait in Medallion”, 1948, oil on Masonite, 19 5/8 x 15 5/ 8 in. Kahlo also gifted this portrait to Samuel Fastlight.
  • Kahlo39379_history5
    Frida Kahlo in Vogue, photographed by Toni Frissell, 1937
  • Kahlo39379_history6
    “Still Life (Round)” (1942), oil on copper, 24.8 in. diameter, Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico
“I paint flowers so they will not die.” – Frida Kahlo

Major Frida Kahlo Sales

"Me and My Parrots" (1941), oil on canvas, 32 x 24 3/4 in. Sold privately for $135,000,000 USD
“Me and My Parrots” (1941), oil on canvas, 32 x 24 3/4 in. Sold privately for $135,000,000 USD
"Diego y Yo" (1949), is coming to auction in November with a presale estimate over $30M. It is likely to set a record as the most valuable Latin American art ever at public auction.
“Diego y Yo” (1949), is coming to auction in November with a presale estimate over $30M. It is likely to set a record as the most valuable Latin American art ever at public auction.
“Dos Desnudos En El Bosque (La Tierra Misma)” (1939), oil on metal, 9 ¾ x 12 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 12 May 2016 for $8,005,000 USD
“Dos Desnudos En El Bosque (La Tierra Misma)” (1939), oil on metal, 9 ¾ x 12 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 12 May 2016 for $8,005,000 USD
“Portrait of a Lady in White” (circa 1929), oil on canvas 46 ½ x 32 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 21 November 2019 for $5,836,500 USD
“Portrait of a Lady in White” (circa 1929), oil on canvas 46 ½ x 32 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 21 November 2019 for $5,836,500 USD
“Roots” (1943), oil on metal, 11 ¾ X 19 ¾ in. Sold at Sotheby’s New York: 24 May 2006 for $5,616,000 USD
“Roots” (1943), oil on metal, 11 ¾ X 19 ¾ in. Sold at Sotheby’s New York: 24 May 2006 for $5,616,000 USD

Still Life Paintings in Museum Collections

“Still Life: Pitahayas” (1938), oil on aluminum, 10 x 14 in., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Wisconsin
“Still Life: Pitahayas” (1938), oil on aluminum, 10 x 14 in., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Wisconsin
“Still Life with Watermelons”(1953), oil on Masonite, 15.4 x 23.3 in., Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City, Mexico
“Still Life with Watermelons”(1953), oil on Masonite, 15.4 x 23.3 in., Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City, Mexico
“Still Life with Parrot and Fruit” (1951), oil on canvas, 10 x 11 in., Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin
“Still Life with Parrot and Fruit” (1951), oil on canvas, 10 x 11 in., Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin
“Viva la Vida, Watermelons” (1954), oil on Masonite, 20.4 x 28.3 in., Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico
“Viva la Vida, Watermelons” (1954), oil on Masonite, 20.4 x 28.3 in., Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico
“Weeping Coconuts” (1951), oil on board, 9 1/8 x 12 in., Los Angeles Country Museum of Art, California
“Weeping Coconuts” (1951), oil on board, 9 1/8 x 12 in., Los Angeles Country Museum of Art, California
“Still Life with Flag” (1954), oil on Masonite, 15 x 20.5 in., Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico
“Still Life with Flag” (1954), oil on Masonite, 15 x 20.5 in., Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico
“I am not sick… I am broken… but I am happy to be alive as long as I can paint.” – Frida Kahlo

Image Gallery

Additional Resources

Still Life (“I Belong to Samuel Fastlicht”) was featured in a recent exhibition at the Dallas Museum of Art, Frida Kahlo: Five Works, March 7, 2021 to June 20, 2021.
A 2020 traveling exhibition of works by Kahlo and Diego Rivera featured a beautiful Kahlo still life from 1943
Discover a recipe from Frida Kahlo’s Cookbook related to her 1943 still life painting, “The Bride who Becomes Frightened when she Sees Life Opened” on view at the Denver Art Museum in 2020

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Other Works by Frida Kahlo