ROBYN DENNY (October 3, 1930 - May 20, 2014)

ROBYN DENNY Robyn Denny, born in Surrey, England as Edward Maurice Fitzgerald Denny, was among the group of young artists in the 1950s and 60s that brought British art into the international mainstream. In an act of rebellion against the St. Ives School of Landscape painting, Denny and his fellow artists were inspired by American movies and international popular culture, leading the movement into abstract painting in conjunction with the Abstract Expressionist movement in America. Throughout his education and career, Denny earned a reputation as a rebel and a radical. He escaped his duties in the Royal Navy by refusing to wear outer clothing, and he covered up frescoes in his hometown church with glaring primary colors. His experimental styles of painting included throwing paint, painting with a stick, and even setting paint on fire. He also explored many themes that were discussed amongst the painters of the New York School, such as gestural painting, color field painting, and geometric abstraction. Though he considered himself more of a tachiste-the European version of abstract expressionism-his works can be very reminiscent of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko, placing him among some of the greatest of the New York School.

ROBYN DENNY
Untitled
screenprint
24 x 21 in.
ROBYN DENNY
Untitled
screenprint
24 x 21 in.
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