GUILLERMO MEZA

Guillermo Meza was a Mexican painter who approached Diego Rivera for an apprenticeship. Rivera was so impressed with his work that he told Meza he didn’t need one. Instead, Rivera wrote a letter of recommendation to the prestigious Galeria de Arte Mexicano. They worked with Meza from the 1940s to the 1960s, handling the sales and promotion of his art. The gallery owner, Ines Amor, believed so strongly in Meza’s talent that she refused to accept commissions on his work until he was financially stable. Meza’s oil paintings were known for their purely fantastical background and distorted human figures. His thematic focus ranged from religion and mythology to social issues. He became an advocate for the indigenous people of Mexico, identifying with their plight because his father was Tlaxcalteca indigenous. He sometimes depicted indigenous traditions, rituals, and mythology, while also denouncing the evils of society, especially with regards to the treatment of the marginalized indigenous races.

GUILLERMO MEZA
De La Tierra Tan Solo Brota
oil on canvas
49 x 43 in.