Claude Monet Market Analysis: Le Chemin du Petit Ailly a Varengeville

Maree basse aux petites-dalles (1884), oil on canvas, 23.6 x 28.7 in. Sold at auction on Monday, May 9, 2016 for $9,882,000 USD
Maree basse aux petites-dalles (1884), oil on canvas, 23.6 x 28.7 in. Sold at auction on Monday, May 9, 2016 for $9,882,000 USD
Antibes, le fort (1888), oil on canvas, 23.6 x 31.9 in. Sold at auction on Wednesday, November 2, 2011 for $9,266,500 USD
Antibes, le fort (1888), oil on canvas, 23.6 x 31.9 in. Sold at auction on Wednesday, November 2, 2011 for $9,266,500 USD
L'Église de Varengeville, soleil couchant (1882), oil on canvas, 25.5 x 31.9 in. Sold at auction on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 for $9,263,939 USD
L’Église de Varengeville, soleil couchant (1882), oil on canvas, 25.5 x 31.9 in. Sold at auction on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 for $9,263,939 USD
Poirier en fleurs (1885), oil on canvas, 25.6 x 31.9 in. Sold at auction on Tuesday, May 7, 2013 for $8,565,000 USD
Poirier en fleurs (1885), oil on canvas, 25.6 x 31.9 in. Sold at auction on Tuesday, May 7, 2013 for $8,565,000 USD
Le jardin de Vétheuil (1881), oil on canvas, 23.4 x 29.3 in. Sold at auction on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 for $7,557,000 USD
Le jardin de Vétheuil (1881), oil on canvas, 23.4 x 29.3 in. Sold at auction on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 for $7,557,000 USD
Le chemin creux, (1882), oil on canvas, 23.6 x 28.9 in. Sold at auction on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 for $7,232,600 USD
Le chemin creux, (1882), oil on canvas, 23.6 x 28.9 in. Sold at auction on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 for $7,232,600 USD

MARKET INSIGHTS

The graph prepared by Art Market Research shows that since 1976, the annual rate of return for Monet paintings at auction is 9.1%

Art Market Research Monet Market Growth 1976-present

Monet_AMR_Graph_jpg_FpS-Ga3D.png

Art Detail

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CLAUDE MONET (1840-1926)

 
The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny. The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
<br>
<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny.
Le Chemin du Petit Ailly a Varengeville188223 1/2 x 28 7/8 in. oil on canvas
Provenance
Probably Durand-Ruel, Paris, purchased from the artist, 16 October 1882
Georges Petit, Paris, 10 September 1883
Durand-Ruel, Paris, purchased from the above, 8 May 1899
Durand-Ruel, New York, transferred from the above, July 1913
Mme d'Alayer, née Marie-Louise Durand-Ruel, grand-daughter of Paul Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1949
Sale: Galerie Charpentier, Paris, 6 June 1956, lot 71
Private Collection, France, acquired at the above sale
Private Collection, acquired from the above
Private Collection, acquired circa 2014
Literature
Durand-Ruel Photograph no. 3254.1
D. Wildenstein, Claude Monet. Biographie et Catalogue Raisonne?, Paris, 1979, no. 803, vol. II, p. 92 (ill., p. 93).
D. Wildenstein, Claude Monet.
...More...Catalogue Raisonne?, Paris, 1991, vol. V, p. 40, no. 803.
D. Wildenstein, Claude Monet. Catalogue Raisonne?, Cologne, 1996, no. 803 vol. II, pp. 298-299, (ill., p. 299).
...LESS...
The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.

Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny.
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