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EMIL NOLDE (1867-1956)

 
Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh.
Sonnenblumen, Abend II194426 1/2 x 35 3/8 Zoll.(67,31 x 89,85 cm) Öl auf Leinwand
Provenienz
Joachim von Lepel, Neukirchen, 1958
Privatsammlung, Deutschland
Sotheby's New York, Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale: Dienstag, 2. November 2010, Los 00021
Privatsammlung, New York
Literaturhinweise
Martin Urban, Emil Nolde, Catalogue Raisonné of the Oil Paintings, Vol. Two, 1915-1951, London, 1990, Nr. 1250, abgebildet S. 511
Fragen Sie

"Bilder sind geistige Wesen. Die Seele des Malers lebt in ihnen." - Emil Nolde

Geschichte

Der gelernte Holzschnitzer Emil Nolde war fast 30 Jahre alt, als er seine ersten Gemälde schuf. Die frühen Gemälde ähneln seinen Zeichnungen und Holzschnitten: groteske Figuren mit kühnen Linien und starken Kontrasten. Der Stil war neu und inspirierte die aufkommende Bewegung Die Brücke, deren Mitglieder Nolde 1906 einluden, sich ihnen anzuschließen. Doch erst als der Garten 1915 zu seiner Wirkungsstätte wurde, baute er auf seiner Beherrschung kontrastreicher Helligkeiten auf und konzentrierte sich auf die Farbe als oberstes Ausdrucksmittel. Später sagte Nolde: "Farbe ist Kraft, Kraft ist Leben", und er hätte nicht besser beschreiben können, warum seine Blumenbilder unsere Wahrnehmung von Farbe neu beleben.

Ein großer Teil der Stärke von Noldes dramatischem, wagnerianisch anmutendem Farbempfinden liegt in der Wirkung der Inszenierung von Primärfarben, wie den tiefen Rottönen und dem Goldgelb von Sonnenblumen, Abend II, vor einer düsteren Farbpalette. Der Kontrast unterstreicht und vertieft die Leuchtkraft der Blumen, nicht nur visuell, sondern auch emotional. Im Jahr 1937, als Noldes Kunst abgelehnt, beschlagnahmt und beschmutzt wurde, wurden seine Gemälde in ganz Nazi-Deutschland in schummrigen Galerien als "entartete Kunst" vorgeführt. Trotz dieser Behandlung verschaffte Noldes Status als "entarteter Künstler" seiner Kunst mehr Freiraum, da er die Gelegenheit nutzte, mehr als 1.300 Aquarelle zu schaffen, die er "unbemalte Bilder" nannte. Er war kein Neuling im Umgang mit dem Aquarell und zeichnete sich seit 1918 durch einen frei fließenden Malstil mit hoch aufgeladenen, transparenten Lavierungen aus. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, gemalt 1944, ist ein seltenes Ölbild aus der Kriegszeit. In diesem Werk ließ er seiner Fantasie freien Lauf, und seine Nass-in-Nass-Technik steigerte die Dramatik der einzelnen Blütenblätter.

Noldes intensive Beschäftigung mit Farben und Blumen, insbesondere Sonnenblumen, spiegelt seine anhaltende Verehrung für van Gogh wider. Er kannte van Gogh bereits seit 1899 und besuchte in den 1920er und frühen 1930er Jahren mehrere Ausstellungen mit Werken des niederländischen Künstlers. Sie teilten eine tiefe Liebe zur Natur. Noldes Hingabe an den Ausdruck und die symbolische Verwendung von Farbe fand in dem Motiv der Sonnenblume eine Fülle, und sie wurde für ihn wie für van Gogh zu einem persönlichen Symbol.

"Farbe ist Kraft, Kraft ist Leben". - Emil Nolde

MARKTEINBLICKE

  • NoldeAMR
  • Vollständig realisierte Sonnenblumengemälde sind nur selten erhältlich, und die meisten Werke zu diesem Thema befinden sich in Museumseinrichtungen.  
  • Die Blumenbilder, die auf Auktionen angeboten werden, gehören zu den meistverkauften Werken Noldes.
  • Wie die Grafik von Art Market Research zeigt, hat der Markt für Emile Nolde seit 1976 um 648,1 % zugelegt.

Spitzenergebnisse bei Auktionen

Öl auf Leinwand, 29 x 35 cm. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: Oktober 2020.

"Herbstmeer XVI" (1911) wurde für 7.344.500 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 29 x 35 cm. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: Oktober 2020.
Öl auf Leinwand, 34 1/4 x 39 5/8 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: November 2017.

Die "Indische Tänzerin" (1917) wurde für 5.262.500 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 34 1/4 x 39 5/8 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: November 2017.
Öl auf Leinwand, 18 1/8 x 19 1/2 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's London: Juni 2006.

"Rotblondes Mädchen" (1919) wurde für 3.826.851 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 18 1/8 x 19 1/2 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's London: Juni 2006.
Öl auf Leinwand, 28¾ x 34¾ cm. Verkauft bei Christie's London: Juni 2006.

"Sonnenuntergang" (1909) wurde für 3.517.759 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 28¾ x 34¾ cm. Verkauft bei Christie's London: Juni 2006.

Vergleichbare Gemälde bei einer Auktion verkauft

Öl auf Leinwand, 26 1/2 x 34 1/2 Zoll. Verkauft bei Grisebach GmbH, Berlin: Dezember 2021.

"Meer I" (1947) wurde für 3.132.800 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 26 1/2 x 34 1/2 Zoll. Verkauft bei Grisebach GmbH, Berlin: Dezember 2021.
  • Gemalt drei Jahre nach Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Geringfügig kleiner als Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Meer I ist kein Blumenbild, sondern eine Meereslandschaft, ein weiteres Thema, das Nolde in dieser Zeit häufig überarbeitete
Öl auf Leinwand, 28 x 22 cm. Verkauft bei Grisebach GmbH, Berlin: Juni 2007.

"Kleine Sonnenblumen" (1946) wurde für 3.042.500 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 28 x 22 cm. Verkauft bei Grisebach GmbH, Berlin: Juni 2007.
  • Gemalt zwei Jahre nach Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Geringfügig kleiner als Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Enthält auch ein Sonnenblumenmotiv
  • Dieses Gemälde war 2014 Teil der Nolde-Retrospektive im Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Dänemark.
Öl auf Leinwand, 29 x 39 13/4 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's, New York: November 2009.

"Üppiger Garten" (1945) wurde für 2.658.500 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 29 x 39 13/4 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's, New York: November 2009.
  • Gemalt ein Jahr nach Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Geringfügig größer als Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Auch wenn es sich nicht um eine Darstellung von Sonnenblumen handelt, ist der Üppige Garten eine ähnliche, eng geschnittene Blumenlandschaft.
Öl auf Leinwand, 26 3/4 x 34 7/8 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's, London: Juni 2012.

"Grosse Sonnenblume und Clematis" (1943) wurde für 2.179.094 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 26 3/4 x 34 7/8 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's, London: Juni 2012.
  • Gemalt ein Jahr vor Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Geringfügig kleiner als Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Gleiches Thema Sonnenblumen

Gemälde in Museumssammlungen

Nationales Museum Thyssen-Bornemisza

"Glühende Sonnenblumen" (1936), Öl auf Leinwand, 35 x 26 1/2 Zoll.

Das Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

"Große Sonnenblumen" (1928), Öl auf Leinwand, 29 x 35 cm.

Das Detroit Institute of Arts

"Sonnenblumen" (1932), Öl auf Leinwand, 29 x 35 cm.

Das Kunstmuseum der Universität Princeton, New Jersey

"Sonnenblumen" (um 1930), Aquarell auf Papier, 9 x 11 Zoll.

Das Albertina Museum, Wien, Österreich

"Herbstblumengarten" (1934), Öl auf Leinwand, 28 3/4 x 34 5/8 Zoll.

National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

"Sonnenblumen, rosa und weiße Dahlien und ein blauer Rittersporn" (um 1930/1940), Aquarell (recto und verso aufgetragen) auf Japanpapier, 18,8 x 14 Zoll.
"Gelb kann Glück ausdrücken, und dann wieder Schmerz. Es gibt Feuerrot, Blutrot und Rosenrot; es gibt Silberblau, Himmelblau und Donnerblau; jede Farbe birgt ihre eigene Seele, die mich erfreut oder abstößt oder anregt." - Emil Nolde

Authentifizierung

Zusätzliche Ressourcen

Emil Nolde. Eine deutsche Legende. Der Künstler während des Naziregimes

Lesen Sie mehr über die 2019 stattfindende Ausstellung von Noldes Werk in den Staatlichen Museen Berlin.

1963 MOMA-Retrospektive

Sehen Sie ähnliche Sonnenblumenbilder in der ersten großen Retrospektive von Noldes Werk, die 1963 im MOMA, New York, gezeigt wurde.

Kirchner und Nolde: Expressionismus. Kolonialismus

Sehen Sie sich das Video zur Ausstellung "Kirchner und Nolde" an, die das Stedelijk Museum 2021 zeigt: Expressionismus. Kolonialismus".

Fragen Sie

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