Zurück

ALEXANDER CALDER (1898-1976)

 
Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others.
Vorspiel zum Menschenfresser194559 x 42 x 18 in.(149,86 x 106,68 x 45,72 cm) Blech, Draht, Farbe
Provenienz
Nachlass des Künstlers
M. Knoedler & Co, New York
Galerie Internazionale, Mailand
Arnold Herstand & Co, New York
Meshulam Riklis, New York
Christies New York, Mai 1997, Los 127
Privatsammlung, erworben aus dem oben genannten Verkauf
Christies New York, Juni, 2001, Los 1103
Privatsammlung
Michelle Rosenfeld Galerie, New York
Privatsammlung
Ausstellung
New York, Buchholz Gallery, Alexander Calder, November-Dezember 1945
Detroit, Detroit Institute of Fine Arts, Ursprünge der modernen Bildhauerei
...Mehr.....Januar - März, 1946
New York, M. Knoedler & Co., Alexander Calder / Fernand Leger, Oktober 1979, S. 9, Nr. 5 (illustriert)
New York, M. Knoedler & Co., Alexander Calder Stehende Mobiles, Dezember 1980-Januar 1981
Barcelona, Spanien, Fundacio Joan Miro, Calder, November 1997-Februar 1998, Nr. 73
Beverly Hills, Kalifornien, Gagosian Gallery, Alexander Calder, Mai - Juni 2003
Los Angeles, Kalifornien, L&M Arts, Alexander Calder, April - Juni, 2012
Michelle Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, Frühjahrsgruppenausstellung, März - Mai 2013
...WENIGER.....
Fragen Sie

"Wenn alles gut geht, ist ein Mobile ein Stück Poesie, das vor Lebensfreude und Überraschung tanzt!" -Alexander Calder

Geschichte

Alexander Calder war eine Schlüsselfigur in der Entwicklung der abstrakten Bildhauerei und ist bekannt für seine bahnbrechenden Arbeiten in der kinetischen Kunst; er ist einer der einflussreichsten Künstler des 20. Jahrhunderts. Prelude to the Man-Eater ist eine fein ausbalancierte, stehende Skulptur, die auf Luftströmungen reagiert und so eine sich ständig verändernde und dynamische visuelle Erfahrung schafft.

Calders Standmobile waren das Ergebnis seines ständigen Experimentierens mit Materialien, Form und Gleichgewicht. Alfred Barr, der erste Direktor des Museum of Modern Art in New York, beauftragte Calder 1945 mit der Schaffung eines neuen Stehmobiles. Das vorliegende Werk ist eine formale Studie für dieses Auftragswerk, Man-Eater With Pennant. Prelude to the Man-Eater ist wie die Skulptur im MoMA so konzipiert, dass sie aus verschiedenen Blickwinkeln betrachtet werden kann und den Betrachter dazu anregt, um sie herumzugehen und mit ihr zu interagieren. Bei beiden Werken bewegen sich die verschiedenen Metallteile um einen zentralen Pfosten. Maquetten und Studien spielten in Calders Praxis eine wichtige Rolle, da sie ihm die Möglichkeit boten, den Maßstab und das Gleichgewicht zu verstehen, bevor er das Werk vergrößerte. Oft existierten diese Maquetten jahrzehntelang in kleinerem Format, bevor sie vergrößert wurden, oder sie existierten einfach in ihrer Größe und wurden nie zu größeren Werken verarbeitet. In Prelude können wir sehen, dass Calder im Vergleich zum endgültigen Werk im MoMA eher vertikal dachte.

Prelude to the Man-Eater ist auch in Calders Vorbereitungszeichnung vertreten, Skizzen für Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopusdargestellt, die sich in der ständigen Sammlung des Harvard Fogg Museum befindet.

  • Calder Rom 1956
    Alexander Calder bei der Eröffnung einer Ausstellung seiner Mobiles in der Galleria Dell'Obelisco in Rom im Jahr 1956 (© Getty)
  • Calder mit Wurzel
    Calder mit Wurzel (1947) Buchholz Gallery/Curt Valentin, New York, 1947 © 2018 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS London
  • Calder-Studio 1941
    Calder's Roxbury Studio, 1941 Herbert Matter © 2018 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS London
  • Ansicht der Installation: Alexander Calder: "Menschenfresser mit Wimpel", The Museum of Modern Art, New York
"So wie man Farben oder Formen komponieren kann, kann man auch Bewegungen komponieren." -Alexander Calder

MARKTEINBLICKE

  • Calder AMR 1.1976-6.2023
  • Alexander Calder ist bekannt für seine Mobiles und Stabiles, die nur selten zum Verkauf angeboten werden.
  • Der Markt von Calder hat seit 1976 eine durchschnittliche jährliche Wachstumsrate von 8 % verzeichnet.
  • Das institutionelle Interesse an Calders Werk nimmt zu, und neue Museen in Asien und im Nahen Osten bemühen sich um Beispiele aus den 1930er und 1940er Jahren.

Top Mobile und Standing Mobile Ergebnisse bei Auktionen

"Poisson Volant" (1957), bemaltes Blech, Stäbe und Draht, 24 x 89 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 13. Juli 2014 für 25.925.000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Ohne Titel" (1949), bemaltes Blech und Draht, 128 x 168 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 16. November 2021 für 19.682.000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Lily of Force" (1945), bemaltes Blech, Stab und Draht, 92 x 81 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 08. Mai 2012 für 18.562.500 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Vergleichbare Mobiles und Stehende Mobiles auf Auktionen verkauft

"Ohne Titel" (1942), bemaltes Blech, Glas, Draht und Schnur, 33 x 23 in. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 11. Mai 2016 für 8.314.000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
  • Kleiner als Prelude to the Man-Eater
  • Ähnlich stabile Zusammensetzung und Format
  • Vergleichbares Datum der Ausführung
"Black II" (1949), bemaltes Blech und Draht, 40 x 33 in. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 12. November 2014 für 4.309.000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
  • Vergleichbare Größe wie Prelude to the Man-Eater
  • Ähnlich stabile Zusammensetzung und Format
  • Vergleichbares Datum der Ausführung
"Stabile with Mobile Element" (1940), bemaltes Blech und Schnur, 24 x 24 in. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 10. November 2015 für 4.085.000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
  • Kleiner als Prelude to the Man-Eater
  • Ähnlich stabile Zusammensetzung und Format
  • Vergleichbares Datum der Ausführung

Mobiles und Stehmobiles in Museumssammlungen

"Man-Eater with Pennants" (1945), bemalte Stahlstangen und Eisenblech, 168 x ca. 360 Zoll Durchmesser, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Spider" (1939), bemaltes Aluminiumblech, Stahlstab und Stahldraht, 80 1/2 x 88 1/2 x 36 1/2 Zoll, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Ohne Titel" (1937), bemalter Stahl, 89 3/4 x 80 x 102 Zoll, The Tate, London. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Yucca" (1941), bemaltes Blech und Draht, 73 1/2 x 23 x 20 Zoll, The Guggenheim, New York. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Für die meisten Menschen, die ein Mobile betrachten, ist es nicht mehr als eine Reihe von flachen Objekten, die sich bewegen. Für einige wenige mag es jedoch Poesie sein." -Alexander Calder

Zusätzliche Ressourcen

Fragen Sie

Anfordern - Kunst Einzel

Das könnte Ihnen auch gefallen

Andere Werke von Alexander Calder