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EMIL NOLDE (1867-1956)

 
Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh.
Sonnenblumen, Abend II194426 1/2 x 35 3/8 in.(67,31 x 89,85 cm) óleo sobre lienzo
Procedencia
Joachim von Lepel, Neukirchen, 1958
Colección privada, Alemania
Sotheby's Nueva York, venta nocturna de arte moderno e impresionista: Martes, 2 de noviembre de 2010, Lote 00021
Colección privada, Nueva York
Literatura
Martin Urban, Emil Nolde, Catalogue Raisonné of the Oil Paintings, Vol. Two, 1915-1951, Londres, 1990, nº 1250, ilustrado en la página 511
Preguntar

"Los cuadros son seres espirituales. El alma del pintor vive en ellos". - Emil Nolde

Historia

Formado como escultor en madera, Emil Nolde tenía casi 30 años antes de realizar sus primeros cuadros. Los primeros cuadros se parecían a sus dibujos y grabados en madera: figuras grotescas con líneas atrevidas y fuertes contrastes. El estilo era nuevo e inspiró al naciente movimiento Die Brücke (El Puente), cuyos miembros invitaron a Nolde a unirse a ellos en 1906. Pero no fue hasta que el jardín se convirtió en su locus operandi, en 1915, cuando aprovechó su dominio de los contrastes de luminosidad para centrarse en el color como medio supremo de expresión. Más tarde, Nolde afirmó que "el color es la fuerza, la fuerza es la vida", y no podría haber caracterizado mejor por qué sus pinturas de flores revigorizan nuestra percepción del color.

Gran parte de la fuerza de la sensibilidad cromática dramática y wagneriana de Nolde es el efecto de la puesta en escena de los colores primarios, como los rojos profundos y los amarillos dorados de Sonnenblumen, Abend II, frente a una paleta sombría. El contraste resalta y profundiza la luminosidad de las flores, no sólo visualmente, sino también emocionalmente. En 1937, cuando el arte de Nolde fue rechazado, confiscado y profanado, sus cuadros desfilaron como "arte degenerado" por toda la Alemania nazi en galerías poco iluminadas. A pesar de ese trato, la condición de artista degenerado de Nolde dio a su arte más espacio para respirar porque aprovechó la oportunidad para producir más de 1.300 acuarelas, que él llamaba "cuadros sin pintar". Sin ser un novato en el manejo de la acuarela, su estilo de pintura de flujo libre se caracterizaba desde 1918 por sus lavados transparentes de gran carga. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, pintado en 1944, es un raro óleo de tiempos de guerra. En esta obra dio rienda suelta a su imaginación, y la utilización de técnicas de mojado sobre mojado realzó el dramatismo de cada pétalo.

La intensa preocupación de Nolde por el color y las flores, especialmente los girasoles, refleja su continua devoción por Van Gogh. Conoció a Van Gogh ya en 1899 y, durante los años veinte y principios de los treinta, visitó varias exposiciones de la obra del artista holandés. Ambos compartían un profundo amor por la naturaleza. La dedicación de Nolde a la expresión y al uso simbólico del color encontró su plenitud en el tema del girasol, y se convirtió en un símbolo personal para él, como lo fue para Van Gogh.

"El color es la fuerza, la fuerza es la vida". - Emil Nolde

CONOCIMIENTOS DEL MERCADO

  • NoldeAMR
  • Los cuadros de girasoles completamente realizados rara vez están disponibles, y la mayoría de las obras de este tema se encuentran en instituciones museísticas.  
  • Cuando los cuadros de flores han salido a subasta, han sido algunas de las obras más vendidas de Nolde.
  • Como ilustra el gráfico de Art Market Research, el mercado de Emile Nolde se ha revalorizado un 648,1% desde 1976.

Los mejores resultados en la subasta

Óleo sobre lienzo, 29 x 35 pulg. Vendido en Christie's Nueva York: Octubre de 2020.

"Herbstmeer XVI" (1911) se vendió por 7.344.500 dólares.

Óleo sobre lienzo, 29 x 35 pulg. Vendido en Christie's Nueva York: Octubre de 2020.
Óleo sobre lienzo, 34 1/4 x 39 5/8 pulg. Vendido en Christie's Nueva York: Noviembre de 2017.

"Indische Tänzerin" (1917) se vendió por 5.262.500 dólares.

Óleo sobre lienzo, 34 1/4 x 39 5/8 pulg. Vendido en Christie's Nueva York: Noviembre de 2017.
Óleo sobre lienzo, 18 1/8 x 19 1/2 pulg. Vendido en Christie's Londres: Junio de 2006.

"Rotblondes Mädchen" (1919) se vendió por 3.826.851 dólares.

Óleo sobre lienzo, 18 1/8 x 19 1/2 pulg. Vendido en Christie's Londres: Junio de 2006.
Óleo sobre lienzo, 28¾ x 34¾ pulg. Vendido en Christie's Londres: Junio de 2006.

"Sonnenuntergang" (1909) se vendió por 3.517.759 dólares.

Óleo sobre lienzo, 28¾ x 34¾ pulg. Vendido en Christie's Londres: Junio de 2006.

Cuadros comparables vendidos en subasta

Óleo sobre lienzo, 26 1/2 x 34 1/2 pulg. Vendido en Grisebach GmbH, Berlín: Diciembre de 2021.

"Meer I" (1947) se vendió por 3.132.800 dólares.

Óleo sobre lienzo, 26 1/2 x 34 1/2 pulg. Vendido en Grisebach GmbH, Berlín: Diciembre de 2021.
  • Pintado tres años después de Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Un poco más pequeño que Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • En lugar de flores, Meer I es un paisaje marino, otro tema que Nolde revisó con frecuencia durante este periodo
Óleo sobre lienzo, 28 x 22 pulg. Vendido en Grisebach GmbH, Berlín: Junio de 2007.

"Kleine Sonnenblumen" (1946) se vendió por 3.042.500 dólares.

Óleo sobre lienzo, 28 x 22 pulg. Vendido en Grisebach GmbH, Berlín: Junio de 2007.
  • Pintado dos años después de Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Un poco más pequeño que Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • También presenta un tema de girasoles
  • Este cuadro fue incluido en la retrospectiva de Nolde de 2014 en el Museo de Arte Moderno de Luisiana, Dinamarca
Óleo sobre lienzo, 29 x 39 13/4 pulg. Vendido en Sotheby's, Nueva York: Noviembre de 2009.

"Üppiger Garten" (1945) se vendió por 2.658.500 dólares.

Óleo sobre lienzo, 29 x 39 13/4 pulg. Vendido en Sotheby's, Nueva York: Noviembre de 2009.
  • Pintado un año después de Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Ligeramente más grande que Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Aunque no se trata de una representación de girasoles, el Üppiger Garten es un paisaje floral similar, muy recortado
Óleo sobre lienzo, 26 3/4 por 34 7/8 pulg. Vendido en Sotheby's, Londres: Junio de 2012.

"Grosse Sonnenblume und Clematis" (1943) se vendió por 2.179.094 dólares.

Óleo sobre lienzo, 26 3/4 por 34 7/8 pulg. Vendido en Sotheby's, Londres: Junio de 2012.
  • Pintado un año antes de Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Un poco más pequeño que Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • El mismo tema del girasol

Pinturas en colecciones de museos

Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza

"Girasoles brillantes" (1936), óleo sobre lienzo, 35 x 26 1/2 pulg.

Museo Metropolitano de Arte, Nueva York

"Grandes girasoles" (1928), óleo sobre lienzo, 29 x 35 pulg.

El Instituto de Arte de Detroit

"Girasoles" (1932), óleo sobre lienzo, 29 x 35 pulg.

Museo de Arte de la Universidad de Princeton, Nueva Jersey

"Girasoles" (c. 1930), acuarela sobre papel, 9 x 11 pulg.

Museo Albertina, Viena, Austria

"Herbstblumengarten" (1934), óleo sobre lienzo, 28 3/4 x 34 5/8 pulg.

La Galería Nacional de Arte, Washington, D.C.

"Girasoles, dalias rosas y blancas y un delfinio azul" (c. 1930/1940), acuarela (aplicada en el anverso y el reverso) sobre papel Japón, 18 5/8 x 14 pulg.
"El amarillo puede expresar felicidad, y también dolor. Hay rojo llama, rojo sangre y rojo rosa; hay azul plata, azul cielo y azul trueno; cada color alberga su propia alma, que me deleita o me disgusta o me estimula." - Emil Nolde

Autenticación

Recursos adicionales

Emil Nolde. Una leyenda alemana. El artista durante el régimen nazi

Lea sobre la exposición de 2019 de la obra de Nolde en los Staatliche Museen de Berlín.

Retrospectiva del MOMA de 1963

Vea cuadros de girasoles similares incluidos en la primera gran retrospectiva de la obra de Nolde que se expuso en 1963 en el MOMA de Nueva York.

Kirchner y Nolde: Expresionismo. Colonialismo

Vea este vídeo que acompaña a la exposición del Stedelijk Museum de 2021 "Kirchner y Nolde: Expresionismo. Colonialismo".

Preguntar

Consulta - Arte individual

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