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DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD (b. 1949)

 
In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others.
Yellow Riverc. 198426 x 96 x 56 in. steel
Provenance
Private Collection, California
Private Collection, Colorado
In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture.

Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others.
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