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GRACE HARTIGAN (1922-2008)

 
Collage (from the French “to glue” or “to stick together”) has been a feature of art for centuries, gaining prominence in the 20th century. Grace Hartigan’s take on collage moves the practice away from representation into near abstraction as the scraps of paper form a grid of painted color. Hints of the original clippings peek through, adding another texture (figuratively and literally) to the piece.
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<br>Grace Hartigan was noted for her sense of color and fusion of abstraction and figuration. In 1954, Alfred Barr, the acclaimed director of the Museum of Modern Art, instructed the purchase of a piece by Hartigan, securing her place as the first of second-generation AbEx artists to enter a museum collection Collage (from the French “to glue” or “to stick together”) has been a feature of art for centuries, gaining prominence in the 20th century. Grace Hartigan’s take on collage moves the practice away from representation into near abstraction as the scraps of paper form a grid of painted color. Hints of the original clippings peek through, adding another texture (figuratively and literally) to the piece.
<br>
<br>Grace Hartigan was noted for her sense of color and fusion of abstraction and figuration. In 1954, Alfred Barr, the acclaimed director of the Museum of Modern Art, instructed the purchase of a piece by Hartigan, securing her place as the first of second-generation AbEx artists to enter a museum collection Collage (from the French “to glue” or “to stick together”) has been a feature of art for centuries, gaining prominence in the 20th century. Grace Hartigan’s take on collage moves the practice away from representation into near abstraction as the scraps of paper form a grid of painted color. Hints of the original clippings peek through, adding another texture (figuratively and literally) to the piece.
<br>
<br>Grace Hartigan was noted for her sense of color and fusion of abstraction and figuration. In 1954, Alfred Barr, the acclaimed director of the Museum of Modern Art, instructed the purchase of a piece by Hartigan, securing her place as the first of second-generation AbEx artists to enter a museum collection Collage (from the French “to glue” or “to stick together”) has been a feature of art for centuries, gaining prominence in the 20th century. Grace Hartigan’s take on collage moves the practice away from representation into near abstraction as the scraps of paper form a grid of painted color. Hints of the original clippings peek through, adding another texture (figuratively and literally) to the piece.
<br>
<br>Grace Hartigan was noted for her sense of color and fusion of abstraction and figuration. In 1954, Alfred Barr, the acclaimed director of the Museum of Modern Art, instructed the purchase of a piece by Hartigan, securing her place as the first of second-generation AbEx artists to enter a museum collection Collage (from the French “to glue” or “to stick together”) has been a feature of art for centuries, gaining prominence in the 20th century. Grace Hartigan’s take on collage moves the practice away from representation into near abstraction as the scraps of paper form a grid of painted color. Hints of the original clippings peek through, adding another texture (figuratively and literally) to the piece.
<br>
<br>Grace Hartigan was noted for her sense of color and fusion of abstraction and figuration. In 1954, Alfred Barr, the acclaimed director of the Museum of Modern Art, instructed the purchase of a piece by Hartigan, securing her place as the first of second-generation AbEx artists to enter a museum collection Collage (from the French “to glue” or “to stick together”) has been a feature of art for centuries, gaining prominence in the 20th century. Grace Hartigan’s take on collage moves the practice away from representation into near abstraction as the scraps of paper form a grid of painted color. Hints of the original clippings peek through, adding another texture (figuratively and literally) to the piece.
<br>
<br>Grace Hartigan was noted for her sense of color and fusion of abstraction and figuration. In 1954, Alfred Barr, the acclaimed director of the Museum of Modern Art, instructed the purchase of a piece by Hartigan, securing her place as the first of second-generation AbEx artists to enter a museum collection Collage (from the French “to glue” or “to stick together”) has been a feature of art for centuries, gaining prominence in the 20th century. Grace Hartigan’s take on collage moves the practice away from representation into near abstraction as the scraps of paper form a grid of painted color. Hints of the original clippings peek through, adding another texture (figuratively and literally) to the piece.
<br>
<br>Grace Hartigan was noted for her sense of color and fusion of abstraction and figuration. In 1954, Alfred Barr, the acclaimed director of the Museum of Modern Art, instructed the purchase of a piece by Hartigan, securing her place as the first of second-generation AbEx artists to enter a museum collection
Untitled (Collage)c. 1950-60s15 x 20 1/2 in.(38.1 x 52.07 cm) mixed media on paper
Provenance
Gifted to Thomas Clyde by artist, East Hampton, New York, c.1950-1960
Estate of Thomas Clyde
[Sale] Cottone Auctions and Appraisals, Fine Art & Antiques, Geneseo, New York, October 3, 2020, Lot 84
Magis Collection, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Collage (from the French “to glue” or “to stick together”) has been a feature of art for centuries, gaining prominence in the 20th century. Grace Hartigan’s take on collage moves the practice away from representation into near abstraction as the scraps of paper form a grid of painted color. Hints of the original clippings peek through, adding another texture (figuratively and literally) to the piece.

Grace Hartigan was noted for her sense of color and fusion of abstraction and figuration. In 1954, Alfred Barr, the acclaimed director of the Museum of Modern Art, instructed the purchase of a piece by Hartigan, securing her place as the first of second-generation AbEx artists to enter a museum collection
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