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DOROTHY HOOD (1918-2000)

 
When Dorothy Hood painted Genies in 1956, she explored new territory, developing various methods and a vocabulary of organic forms drawn from her observations of nature and the human body. Inclusive of their ambiguous and transformative nature, abstract and figurative elements engage in a dynamic interplay, weaving together, intertwining, and merging identities within a metaphysical soup. Rather than the formal stasis of a woven tapestry, in Genies, abstraction breathes, stretches, and flows in an energy field of sinewy, ribbon-like tendrils. It is a work that embodies a fusion of abstraction and surrealism. Its implied depth of field, perspective, and figurative references suggest a woman whose arched body imbues the piece with emotional, psychological, or mythological depth. These elements capture the complex essence of a woman’s stance and situation, effectively conflating the boundaries between two distinct artistic movements. When Dorothy Hood painted Genies in 1956, she explored new territory, developing various methods and a vocabulary of organic forms drawn from her observations of nature and the human body. Inclusive of their ambiguous and transformative nature, abstract and figurative elements engage in a dynamic interplay, weaving together, intertwining, and merging identities within a metaphysical soup. Rather than the formal stasis of a woven tapestry, in Genies, abstraction breathes, stretches, and flows in an energy field of sinewy, ribbon-like tendrils. It is a work that embodies a fusion of abstraction and surrealism. Its implied depth of field, perspective, and figurative references suggest a woman whose arched body imbues the piece with emotional, psychological, or mythological depth. These elements capture the complex essence of a woman’s stance and situation, effectively conflating the boundaries between two distinct artistic movements. When Dorothy Hood painted Genies in 1956, she explored new territory, developing various methods and a vocabulary of organic forms drawn from her observations of nature and the human body. Inclusive of their ambiguous and transformative nature, abstract and figurative elements engage in a dynamic interplay, weaving together, intertwining, and merging identities within a metaphysical soup. Rather than the formal stasis of a woven tapestry, in Genies, abstraction breathes, stretches, and flows in an energy field of sinewy, ribbon-like tendrils. It is a work that embodies a fusion of abstraction and surrealism. Its implied depth of field, perspective, and figurative references suggest a woman whose arched body imbues the piece with emotional, psychological, or mythological depth. These elements capture the complex essence of a woman’s stance and situation, effectively conflating the boundaries between two distinct artistic movements. When Dorothy Hood painted Genies in 1956, she explored new territory, developing various methods and a vocabulary of organic forms drawn from her observations of nature and the human body. Inclusive of their ambiguous and transformative nature, abstract and figurative elements engage in a dynamic interplay, weaving together, intertwining, and merging identities within a metaphysical soup. Rather than the formal stasis of a woven tapestry, in Genies, abstraction breathes, stretches, and flows in an energy field of sinewy, ribbon-like tendrils. It is a work that embodies a fusion of abstraction and surrealism. Its implied depth of field, perspective, and figurative references suggest a woman whose arched body imbues the piece with emotional, psychological, or mythological depth. These elements capture the complex essence of a woman’s stance and situation, effectively conflating the boundaries between two distinct artistic movements. When Dorothy Hood painted Genies in 1956, she explored new territory, developing various methods and a vocabulary of organic forms drawn from her observations of nature and the human body. Inclusive of their ambiguous and transformative nature, abstract and figurative elements engage in a dynamic interplay, weaving together, intertwining, and merging identities within a metaphysical soup. Rather than the formal stasis of a woven tapestry, in Genies, abstraction breathes, stretches, and flows in an energy field of sinewy, ribbon-like tendrils. It is a work that embodies a fusion of abstraction and surrealism. Its implied depth of field, perspective, and figurative references suggest a woman whose arched body imbues the piece with emotional, psychological, or mythological depth. These elements capture the complex essence of a woman’s stance and situation, effectively conflating the boundaries between two distinct artistic movements. When Dorothy Hood painted Genies in 1956, she explored new territory, developing various methods and a vocabulary of organic forms drawn from her observations of nature and the human body. Inclusive of their ambiguous and transformative nature, abstract and figurative elements engage in a dynamic interplay, weaving together, intertwining, and merging identities within a metaphysical soup. Rather than the formal stasis of a woven tapestry, in Genies, abstraction breathes, stretches, and flows in an energy field of sinewy, ribbon-like tendrils. It is a work that embodies a fusion of abstraction and surrealism. Its implied depth of field, perspective, and figurative references suggest a woman whose arched body imbues the piece with emotional, psychological, or mythological depth. These elements capture the complex essence of a woman’s stance and situation, effectively conflating the boundaries between two distinct artistic movements. When Dorothy Hood painted Genies in 1956, she explored new territory, developing various methods and a vocabulary of organic forms drawn from her observations of nature and the human body. Inclusive of their ambiguous and transformative nature, abstract and figurative elements engage in a dynamic interplay, weaving together, intertwining, and merging identities within a metaphysical soup. Rather than the formal stasis of a woven tapestry, in Genies, abstraction breathes, stretches, and flows in an energy field of sinewy, ribbon-like tendrils. It is a work that embodies a fusion of abstraction and surrealism. Its implied depth of field, perspective, and figurative references suggest a woman whose arched body imbues the piece with emotional, psychological, or mythological depth. These elements capture the complex essence of a woman’s stance and situation, effectively conflating the boundaries between two distinct artistic movements.
Genies195635 1/2 x 45 3/8 in.(90.17 x 115.25 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
Collection of Harold A. Coffmann, Cedar Hill, Texas
Heritage Auctions, November 2, 2019
Private Collection, Texas
Exhibition
Texas, Dallas Art Fair 2023: McClain Gallery Booth,  April 20 - April 23, 2023
When Dorothy Hood painted Genies in 1956, she explored new territory, developing various methods and a vocabulary of organic forms drawn from her observations of nature and the human body. Inclusive of their ambiguous and transformative nature, abstract and figurative elements engage in a dynamic interplay, weaving together, intertwining, and merging identities within a metaphysical soup. Rather than the formal stasis of a woven tapestry, in Genies, abstraction breathes, stretches, and flows in an energy field of sinewy, ribbon-like tendrils. It is a work that embodies a fusion of abstraction and surrealism. Its implied depth of field, perspective, and figurative references suggest a woman whose arched body imbues the piece with emotional, psychological, or mythological depth. These elements capture the complex essence of a woman’s stance and situation, effectively conflating the boundaries between two distinct artistic movements.
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