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EMIL NOLDE (1867-1956)

 
Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh. Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh.
Sonnenblumen, Abend II194426 1/2 x 35 3/8 in.(67,31 x 89,85 cm) huile sur toile
Provenance
Joachim von Lepel, Neukirchen, 1958
Collection privée, Allemagne
Sotheby's New York, Vente du soir d'art impressionniste et moderne : Mardi 2 novembre 2010, Lot 00021
Collection privée, New York
Littérature
Martin Urban, Emil Nolde, Catalogue raisonné des peintures à l'huile, vol. 2, 1915-1951, Londres, 1990, n° 1250, illustré p. 511.
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"Les tableaux sont des êtres spirituels. L'âme du peintre vit en eux." - Emil Nolde

Histoire

Sculpteur sur bois de formation, Emil Nolde avait presque 30 ans lorsqu'il a réalisé ses premières peintures. Les premières peintures ressemblent à ses dessins et à ses gravures sur bois : des figures grotesques aux lignes audacieuses et aux contrastes forts. Le style était nouveau et a inspiré le mouvement naissant Die Brücke (Le Pont), dont les membres ont invité Nolde à se joindre à eux en 1906. Mais ce n'est qu'en 1915, lorsque le jardin devient son lieu d'action, qu'il s'appuie sur sa maîtrise des contrastes de luminosité pour se concentrer sur la couleur comme moyen d'expression suprême. Plus tard, Nolde a affirmé que "la couleur est la force, la force est la vie", et il n'aurait pas pu mieux définir la raison pour laquelle ses peintures de fleurs revigorent notre perception de la couleur.

La force de la sensibilité aux couleurs de Nolde, dramatique et wagnérienne, réside en grande partie dans l'effet de la mise en scène des couleurs primaires, comme les rouges profonds et les jaunes dorés de Sonnenblumen, Abend II, sur une palette sombre. Le contraste fait ressortir et approfondit la luminosité des fleurs, non seulement sur le plan visuel, mais aussi sur le plan émotionnel. En 1937, lorsque l'art de Nolde a été rejeté, confisqué et souillé, ses tableaux ont été présentés comme de "l'art dégénéré" dans toute l'Allemagne nazie, dans des galeries mal éclairées. Malgré ce traitement, le statut d'artiste dégénéré de Nolde a permis à son art de respirer davantage, car il a saisi l'occasion de produire plus de 1 300 aquarelles, qu'il appelait "tableaux non peints". N'étant pas un novice dans le maniement de l'aquarelle, son style libre se caractérisait depuis 1918 par des lavis transparents et très chargés. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, peint en 1944, est une huile rare datant de la guerre. Il a laissé libre cours à son imagination dans cette œuvre, et son utilisation de la technique "mouillé sur mouillé" a renforcé le caractère dramatique de chaque pétale.

L'intense préoccupation de Nolde pour la couleur et les fleurs, en particulier les tournesols, reflète son attachement constant à van Gogh. Il connaissait van Gogh dès 1899 et, dans les années 1920 et au début des années 1930, il a visité plusieurs expositions de l'artiste néerlandais. Ils partageaient un amour profond de la nature. Le dévouement de Nolde à l'expression et à l'utilisation symbolique de la couleur a trouvé sa plénitude dans le sujet du tournesol, qui est devenu un symbole personnel pour lui, comme pour Van Gogh.

"La couleur est la force, la force est la vie." - Emil Nolde

LES CONNAISSANCES DU MARCHÉ

  • NoldeAMR
  • Les peintures de tournesols entièrement réalisées sont rarement disponibles, et la plupart des œuvres de ce sujet se trouvent dans des institutions muséales.  
  • Lorsque des peintures de fleurs ont été mises aux enchères, elles ont fait partie des œuvres les plus vendues de Nolde.
  • Comme l'illustre le graphique de Art Market Research, le marché d'Emile Nolde s'est apprécié de 648,1% depuis 1976.

Les meilleurs résultats aux enchères

Huile sur toile, 29 x 35 in. Vendu chez Christie's New York : Octobre 2020.

"Herbstmeer XVI" (1911) a été vendu pour 7 344 500 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 29 x 35 in. Vendu chez Christie's New York : Octobre 2020.
Huile sur toile, 34 1/4 x 39 5/8 in. Vendu chez Christie's New York : Novembre 2017.

"Indische Tänzerin" (1917) vendu pour 5 262 500 $.

Huile sur toile, 34 1/4 x 39 5/8 in. Vendu chez Christie's New York : Novembre 2017.
Huile sur toile, 18 1/8 x 19 1/2 in. Vendu chez Christie's Londres : Juin 2006.

"Rotblondes Mädchen" (1919) a été vendu pour 3 826 851 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 18 1/8 x 19 1/2 in. Vendu chez Christie's Londres : Juin 2006.
Huile sur toile, 28¾ x 34¾ po. Vendu chez Christie's Londres : Juin 2006.

"Sonnenuntergang" (1909) a été vendu pour 3 517 759 $.

Huile sur toile, 28¾ x 34¾ po. Vendu chez Christie's Londres : Juin 2006.

Tableaux comparables vendus aux enchères

Huile sur toile, 26 1/2 x 34 1/2 in. Vendu à Grisebach GmbH, Berlin : Décembre 2021.

"Meer I" (1947) a été vendu pour 3 132 800 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 26 1/2 x 34 1/2 in. Vendu à Grisebach GmbH, Berlin : Décembre 2021.
  • Peint trois ans après Sonnenblumen, Abend II.
  • Légèrement plus petit que Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Plutôt que des fleurs, Meer I est un paysage marin, un autre sujet que Nolde a fréquemment révisé au cours de cette période.
Huile sur toile, 28 x 22 in. Vendu à Grisebach GmbH, Berlin : juin 2007.

"Kleine Sonnenblumen" (1946) a été vendu pour 3 042 500 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 28 x 22 in. Vendu à Grisebach GmbH, Berlin : juin 2007.
  • Peint deux ans après Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Légèrement plus petit que Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Présente également un sujet tournesol
  • Cette peinture a été incluse dans la rétrospective Nolde de 2014 au musée d'art moderne de Louisiane, au Danemark.
Huile sur toile, 29 x 39 13/4 in. Vendu chez Sotheby's, New York : Novembre 2009.

"Üppiger Garten" (1945) a été vendu pour 2 658 500 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 29 x 39 13/4 in. Vendu chez Sotheby's, New York : Novembre 2009.
  • Peint un an après Sonnenblumen, Abend II.
  • Légèrement plus grand que Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Bien qu'il ne s'agisse pas d'une représentation de tournesols, Üppiger Garten est un paysage floral similaire, au cadrage serré.
Huile sur toile, 26 3/4 par 34 7/8 in. Vendu chez Sotheby's, Londres : Juin 2012.

"Grosse Sonnenblume und Clematis" (1943) a été vendu pour 2 179 094 $.

Huile sur toile, 26 3/4 par 34 7/8 in. Vendu chez Sotheby's, Londres : Juin 2012.
  • Peint un an avant Sonnenblumen, Abend II.
  • Légèrement plus petit que Sonnenblumen, Abend II
  • Même sujet de tournesol

Peintures dans les collections des musées

Musée national Thyssen-Bornemisza

"Tournesols rougeoyants" (1936), huile sur toile, 35 x 26 1/2 in.

Le Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

"Grands tournesols" (1928), huile sur toile, 29 x 35 in.

L'Institut des arts de Détroit

"Tournesols" (1932), huile sur toile, 29 x 35 in.

Musée d'art de l'université de Princeton, New Jersey

"Tournesols" (c. 1930), aquarelle sur papier, 9 x 11 in.

Le musée Albertina, Vienne, Autriche

"Herbstblumengarten" (1934), huile sur toile, 28 3/4 x 34 5/8 in.

La National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

"Tournesols, dahlias roses et blancs et delphiniums bleus" (c. 1930/1940), aquarelle (appliquée au recto et au verso) sur papier japonais, 18 5/8 x 14 in.
"Le jaune peut exprimer le bonheur, mais aussi la douleur. Il y a le rouge flamme, le rouge sang et le rouge rose ; il y a le bleu argent, le bleu ciel et le bleu tonnerre ; chaque couleur abrite sa propre âme, me ravit ou me dégoûte ou me stimule." - Emil Nolde

Authentification

Ressources supplémentaires

Emil Nolde. Une légende allemande. L'artiste sous le régime nazi

Découvrez l'exposition 2019 de l'œuvre de Nolde aux Staatliche Museen de Berlin.

Rétrospective 1963 du MOMA

Voir des peintures de tournesols similaires incluses dans la première grande rétrospective de l'œuvre de Nolde qui a été exposée en 1963 au MOMA, à New York.

Kirchner et Nolde : Expressionnisme. Colonialisme

Regardez cette vidéo qui accompagnait l'exposition "Kirchner et Nolde" du Stedelijk Museum en 2021 : Expressionnisme. Colonialisme".

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