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ALEXANDER CALDER-nbsp(1898-1976)

 
Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others. Alexander Calder was a key figure in the development of abstract sculpture and is renowned for his groundbreaking work in kinetic art; he is one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century. "Prelude to Man-Eater" is a delicately balanced standing sculpture that responds to air currents, creating a constantly changing and dynamic visual experience.<br><br>Calder's Standing Mobiles were a result of his continuous experimentation with materials, form, and balance. This Standing Mobile is a historically significant prelude to a larger work commissioned in 1945 by Alfred Barr, the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. "Prelude to Maneater" is designed to be viewed from multiple angles, encouraging viewers to walk around and interact with it.<br><br>The present work is a formal study for Man-Eater With Pennant (1945), part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The work is also represented in "Sketches for Mobiles: Prelude to Man-Eater; Starfish; Octopus", which is in the permanent collection of the Harvard Fogg Museum.<br><br>Calder's mobiles and stabiles can be found in esteemed private collections and the collections of major museums worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate Gallery in London among others.
Prélude au mangeur d'hommes194559 x 42 x 18 in.(149,86 x 106,68 x 45,72 cm) tôle, fil de fer, peinture
Provenance
Succession de l'artiste
M. Knoedler & Co, New York
Galerie Internazionale, Milan
Arnold Herstand & Co, New York
Meshulam Riklis, New York
Christies New York, mai 1997, lot 127
Collection privée, acquise lors de la vente ci-dessus
Christies New York, juin 2001, lot 1103
Collection privée
Galerie Michelle Rosenfeld, New York
Collection privée
Exposition
New York, Galerie Buchholz, Alexander Calder, novembre-décembre, 1945
Détroit, Institut des beaux-arts de Détroit, Origines de la sculpture moderne
...Plus.....Janvier - mars 1946
New York, M. Knoedler & Co, Alexander Calder / Fernand Leger, octobre 1979, p. 9, no. 5 (illustré)
New York, M. Knoedler & Co, Alexander Calder Standing Mobiles, décembre 1980-janvier 1981
Barcelone, Espagne, Fundacio Joan Miro, Calder, novembre 1997-février 1998, n° 73
Beverly Hills, Californie, Gagosian Gallery, Alexander Calder, mai-juin 2003
Los Angeles, Californie, L&M Arts, Alexander Calder, avril - juin 2012
Michelle Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, Spring Group Show, mars - mai 2013
...MOINS.....
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"Quand tout va bien, un mobile est un morceau de poésie qui danse avec la joie de vivre et la surprise ! -Alexander Calder

Histoire

Alexander Calder a joué un rôle clé dans le développement de la sculpture abstraite et est réputé pour son travail novateur dans le domaine de l'art cinétique ; il est l'un des artistes les plus influents du XXe siècle. Prelude to the Man-Eater est une sculpture sur pied délicatement équilibrée qui réagit aux courants d'air, créant une expérience visuelle dynamique et en constante évolution.

Les mobiles sur pied de Calder sont le résultat d'une expérimentation continue des matériaux, de la forme et de l'équilibre. Alfred Barr, le premier directeur du Museum of Modern Art de New York, a demandé à Calder de créer un nouveau mobile debout en 1945. La présente œuvre est une étude formelle pour cette commande, Man-Eater With Pennant. Prelude to the Man-Eater, comme la sculpture du MoMA, est conçue pour être vue sous plusieurs angles, encourageant les spectateurs à marcher autour de l'œuvre et à interagir avec elle. Dans les deux œuvres, les différents éléments métalliques se déplacent autour d'un poteau central. Les maquettes et les études jouaient un rôle essentiel dans la pratique de Calder, car elles lui permettaient de comprendre l'échelle et l'équilibre avant d'agrandir la pièce. Souvent, ces maquettes ont existé dans le plus petit format pendant des décennies avant d'être agrandies ou ont simplement existé à leur taille sans jamais être transformées en œuvres plus grandes. Dans Prelude, on peut voir Calder penser plus verticalement que dans l'œuvre finale du MoMA.

Prelude to the Man-Eater est également représenté dans le dessin préparatoire de Calder, Esquisses pour mobiles : Prélude au mangeur d'hommes, à l'étoile de mer, à la pieuvrequi fait partie de la collection permanente du Harvard Fogg Museum.

  • Calder Rome 1956
    Alexander Calder lors de l'inauguration d'une exposition de ses mobiles à la Galleria Dell'Obelisco à Rome en 1956 (© Getty)
  • Calder avec Root
    Calder with Root (1947) Buchholz Gallery/Curt Valentin, New York, 1947 © 2018 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS London
  • Studio Calder 1941
    Studio de Calder à Roxbury, 1941 Herbert Matter © 2018 Fondation Calder, New York / DACS Londres
  • Vue de l'installation : Alexander Calder : "Man-Eater With Pennant", The Museum of Modern Art, New York
"Tout comme on peut composer des couleurs ou des formes, on peut composer des mouvements. -Alexander Calder

LES CONNAISSANCES DU MARCHÉ

  • Calder AMR 1.1976-6.2023
  • Alexander Calder est connu pour ses mobiles et ses stabiles, qui sont rarement mis en vente.
  • Le marché de Calder a connu un taux de croissance annuel composé de 8 % depuis 1976.
  • L'intérêt institutionnel pour l'œuvre de Calder augmente, avec de nouveaux musées asiatiques et du Moyen-Orient qui cherchent à posséder des exemples des années 1930 et 1940.

Résultats des ventes aux enchères de téléphones mobiles et de téléphones mobiles en attente

" Poisson Volant " (1957), tôle peinte, tige et fil de fer, 24 x 89 in. Vendue chez Christie's New York : 13 juillet 2014 pour 25 925 000 dollars. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Sans titre (1949), tôle peinte et fil de fer, 128 x 168 in. Vendue chez Sotheby's New York : 16 novembre 2021 pour 19 682 000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Lily of Force" (1945), tôle peinte, tige et fil de fer, 92 x 81 in. Vendue chez Christie's New York : 08 mai 2012 pour 18 562 500 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Mobiles comparables et mobiles sur pied vendus aux enchères

" Untitled " (1942), tôle peinte, verre, fil de fer et ficelle, 33 x 23 in. Vendue chez Sotheby's New York : 11 mai 2016 pour 8 314 000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
  • Plus petit que le Prélude au mangeur d'hommes
  • Une composition et un format similaires et stables
  • Date d'exécution comparable
" Black II " (1949), tôle peinte et fil de fer, 40 x 33 in. Vendue chez Christie's New York : 12 novembre 2014 pour 4 309 000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
  • Taille comparable à celle du Prélude au mangeur d'hommes
  • Une composition et un format similaires et stables
  • Date d'exécution comparable
" Stabile with Mobile Element " (1940), tôle peinte et corde, 24 x 24 in. Vendue chez Christie's New York : 10 novembre 2015 pour 4 085 000 $. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
  • Plus petit que le Prélude au mangeur d'hommes
  • Une composition et un format similaires et stables
  • Date d'exécution comparable

Mobiles et mobiles sur pied dans les collections de musées

"Man-Eater with Pennants" (1945), tiges d'acier peintes et tôle de fer, 168 x environ 360 in. de diamètre, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Spider" (1939), tôle d'aluminium peinte, tige d'acier et fil d'acier, 80 1/2 x 88 1/2 x 36 1/2 in, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Untitled" (1937), acier peint, 89 3/4 x 80 x 102 in, The Tate, Londres. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Yucca" (1941), tôle peinte et fil de fer, 73 1/2 x 23 x 20 in, The Guggenheim, New York. © 2023 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
"Pour la plupart des gens qui regardent un mobile, ce n'est rien de plus qu'une série d'objets plats qui bougent. Pour quelques-uns, cependant, c'est peut-être de la poésie". -Alexander Calder

Ressources supplémentaires

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