Camille Pissarro – Le Jardin des Tuileries, après-midi, soleil

 

Camille Pissarro - Le Jardin des Tuileries, après-midi, soleil

Camille Pissarro (1830-1903)

Le Jardin des Tuileries, après-midi, soleil

1900

oil on canvas

26 x 36 1/2 in. (66 x 92.7 cm)

Signed lower left, “C. Pissarro 1900”

Provenance:

Durand-Ruel, Paris

Ernst Poensgen, Dusseldorf, acquired in Paris, 1910

Private Collection, Switzerland

M. Knoedler & Co., New York, jointly purchased with Galerie Nathan, Zurich, July 17, 1956

Private Collection, New Jersey, acquired August 31, 1959

Exhibition:

Essen, Villa Hugel, Werk der Franzosischen Malerei und Graphik des 19. Jahrhunderts, 1954, no. 76

New Orleans, Isaac Delgado Museum of Art, Odyssey of an Art Collector: Unity in Diversity, Five Thousand Years of Art, 1966-76, no. 186, illus.

Orleans, Musee des Beaux-Arts, Peintures francaises du Museum of Art de La Nouvelle-Orleans, 1984, no. 25

Memphis, Tennessee, Dixon Gallery and Gardens, French Paintings of Three Centuries from the New Orleans Museum of Art, 1992-93, no. 30, illus. In color (& traveling)

Koriyama, Japan, Koriyama City Museum of Art, French Paintings of Four Centuries from the New Orleans Museum of Art, 1993, no. 29 (& traveling)

Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art, Camille Pissarro and His Descendants, 2000-01, no. 65, illus. In color (titled Garden of the Tuileries in Winter)

Stanford, California Iris and B. Gerald Canton Center of Visual Arts at Standford University, The Changing Garden: Four Centuries of European and American Art, 2003, no. 6 (& traveling)

Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza & Barcelona, Caixa Forum, Pissarro, 2013-14

Literature:

Joachim Pissarro and Claire Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, Pissarro, Catalogue critique des peintures, vol. III, Paris, 2005, no. 1314, illus. in color p. 812

Le Jardin des Tuileries, après-midi, soleil belongs to a series of canvases Camille Pissarro painted from the apartment he rented in Paris during his second stay there in 1899 and 1900.  

The view faces the network of circular and rectilinear features surrounding Grand Bassin des Tuileries located in the eastern section of the gardens. Pissarro cropped and otherwise manipulated this perspective on fifteen of the twenty-eight canvases he produced of Tuileries. Other Pissarro paintings of these gardens are housed in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, and the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Pissarro-artist-quote-01

History

Le Jardin des Tuileries, après-midi, soleil belongs to a series of canvases Camille Pissarro painted from the apartment he rented at 204 rue de Rivoli during his second stay there in 1899 and 1900.  Unlike Monet, Pissarro’s approach to serial painting did not involve methodically working several canvases simultaneously to capture a single motif in varying light and atmospheric conditions. Instead, he varied his point of view — sometimes ever so slightly turning his gaze to the right or left working within a wide range of atmospheric conditions, the motifs completely autonomous and self-sufficient. This particular apartment afforded the opportunity to move from one window to another and three distinct views that included this frontal view of Grand Bassin des Tuileries, another of the Pavillon de Flore and the southern wing Denon wing of the Louvre, and lastly to east the Pavillon de Marsan on the left, the Jardin du Carrousel in the center and the Denon wing in the distance. The possibilities clearly excited the septuagenarian. In December 1898 he wrote his son Lucien that, “we got an apartment opposite the Tuileries with a magnificent view on the garden, the Louvre on the left ,the dome of Invalides on the right, the arrow of Sainte-Clotilde behind the bouquet of chestnut trees — it’s absolutely charming.” (Pissarro, Hayward Gallery, London, 1980, page 146)

The view faces the network of circular and rectilinear features surrounding Grand Bassin des Tuileries located in the eastern section of the gardens. Pissarro cropped and otherwise manipulated this perspective on fifteen of the twenty-eight canvases he produced of Tuileries. Designed by seventeenth-century landscape architect Andre Le Norte, the formality of these interlocking elements do not betray Pissarro’s well-regarded knack for avoiding cleverly arranged compositions in part because he fragmented the austere, symmetrical layout. He also achieved a natural elegance by accentuating the horizon and lending a stronger sense of a panoramic expanse and because he utilized a rather sly compositional device by ‘squaring up’ the view to the distanced twin spires of the neo-gothic basilica Sainte-Clotilde, a centered point of interest that rises above that deep expanse reinforced by strong diagonals.  Lastly, he forgoes any touristy affectations by limiting figural references to the actual garden sculptures intact at Tuileries though admittedly, it is difficult to discern whether or not the painter coyly added a warm body or two amidst mythological deities of stone or bronze.   

The view is southwesterly, the shadows suggesting Pissarro worked this canvas during the waning hours of a late spring afternoon. He deepens our appreciation of that time of season and day by creating an intoxicating optical mix of predominately analogous cool-toned hues plied together — soft greens and yellows, as well as tamped-down blues and mauves that coalesce into an atmospheric halo-like effect. It comes as close to one of nature’s most glorious lighting phenomenon; a harmonic sensation brought to full effect here by the airy arboreal effect of the tree branches that rake the sky and provide veils of an ameliorating guise.

After 1889 when Camille Pissarro began to suffer from a chronic eye infection and found himself increasingly unable to work out of doors, he painted separated from the world by windows frequently traveling and living a life tethered to hotels in order to vary his subjects. Le Jardin des Tuileries, après-midi, soleil was executed with that profound physical deficit. Yet it retains all the vitality and dexterity of the best Impressionism of the period. That is no surprise.  In a career that spanned the second half of the nineteenth century, Camille Pissarro is as celebrated for his ever-present freshness of eye and spirit as his well-known openness to new ideas. We tend to think of Pissarro as the most rural of the Impressionist painters, yet he produced eleven urban series encompassing more than 300 cityscapes during the last decade of his life. Le Jardin des Tuileries, après-midi, soleil may come as a revelation to some, but it is among those paintings that establish his place as a painter of his own epoch that found the sublime everywhere.

  • Camille Pissarro 1890s-WEB
    Camille Pissarro, c. 1890
  • Pissarro-rue-rivoli-WEB
    204 rue de Rivoli, Paris. From this apartment Pissarro painted his view of Jardin des Tuileries
  • tuileries-photo-WEB
    Photograph of Tuileries Garden, Paris
  • Le Jardin Des Tuileries Effet De Neige-WEB
    Camille Pissarro (1830-1903), “Le jardin des Tuileries,effet de neige”, 1900, oil on canvas, 25 1/2 x 21 1/4 in.
  • The Bassin des Tuileries-WEB
    Camille Pissarro (1830-1903),”The Bassin des Tuileries, Afternoon”, 1900, oil on canvas, 25 1/2 x 36 1/4 in.

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Authentication

The definitive authority on the authenticity of paintings by Van Gogh, the Van Gogh Museum inspected this painting in January 2020 and provided this letter of authenticity. During that inspection, X-ray revealed a second painting under the surface – a portrait of a man.

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