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RODNEY MCMILLIAN (b. 1969)

 
Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
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<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
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<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019. Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
<br>
<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
<br>
<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019.
Lollipop2001-0278 1/4 x 68 in latex on canvas
Provenance
Finesilver Gallery
Private Collection, Texas

110,000

Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.

McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.

McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019.
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