Heather James New York gallery brochure

PUBLISHED IN: Catalogs

After his move to Paris in 1950, Sam Francis began to use vibrant, bold color in his painting.  Influenced by Henri Matisse, Francis evolved his palette to include bright reds, yellows, whites and blues. “New York, New York” is an exemplary work that shows the influence of the Parisian art scene on the artist. Francis provides the link between the audacious American Abstract Expressionism and the more calligraphic European Tachisme.

SAM FRANCIS

N.C. WYETH - With a Quick, Noiseless Stride, He Crossed the Narrow Space - oil on canvas - 30 1/4 x 20 1/8 in.

N.C. WYETH

Gottlieb was a first-generation member of the Abstract Expressionists. “Blue on Black” is from his trademark “Burst” series. Like fellow Ab Ex artists including Pollock who settled into their signature style late in their careers, it was not until 1956 that Gottlieb focused on these burst paintings.
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<br>This painting showcases the lyricism that he found within the “Burst” paintings by simplifying color and form. In this painting, the shapes and color coalesce to produce harmony and depth within the visual landscape of the canvas.
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<br>Gottlieb had an amazing 56 solo exhibitions during his long career and his works are included in over 140 museums throughout the world.

ADOLPH GOTTLIEB

When Life Magazine ran a slick pictorial spread entitled “Women Artists in Ascension” in their May 13, 1957 issue, it named Grace Hartigan “the most celebrated of the young women artists.” Truthfully, any one of the five women – Grace Hartigan, Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell,  Elaine de Kooning, and Helen Frankenthaler — identified by Mary Gabriel in Ninth Street Women as the key female members of the New York School of painters would have felt the claim marginalized their work when freighted with the qualifier ‘woman’.  After all, they were forging their way into the emerging art scene at the very moment of the ascendance of Abstract Expressionism and doing so on equal terms with the men. Yet the more important point is that the assertion is in fact, true. During the 1950s, Hartigan was the most successful female artist of the time. Beginning in 1951, solo exhibitions had become a yearly occurrence at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery.  In 1953, Alfred Barr, director of the Museum of Modern Art instructed the institution to purchase her canvas “The Persian Jacket”. To his mind, Hartigan’s diametrically brushed images utilized the lessons of abstraction to figurative ends that proved not a retreat from Pollock, but a way forward. It would be the first work by a ‘second-generation’ New York School painter of either gender accepted into a museum collection, let alone the Museum of Modern Art. Hartigan painted this piece, "Still Life with Blue Wall" that same year. 
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<br>Hartigan continued to work within a range between representationalism and abstraction; a predilection she shared with both Elaine and Willem de Kooning. Early on, the hurly-burly activities and window displays outside her third-story studio were the visual sweetmeat she incorporated and served to showcase her abilities as one of the strongest colorists of the New York School.

GRACE HARTIGAN

ROBERT MOTHERWELL - In Black and White - oil on paper mounted on board - 22 3/4 x 28 3/4 in.

ROBERT MOTHERWELL

JEAN-BAPTISTE GREUZE - Portrait of Jeanne Philiberte Ledoux (1767–1840), half-length - oil on panel - 23 5/8 x 19 3/8 in.

JEAN-BAPTISTE GREUZE

Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951).

FRANZ KLINE

IRVING NORMAN - Prison - oil on canvas - 56 x 46 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Prisoners - oil on canvas - 52 x 68 1/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Cityscape - oil on canvas - 74 1/8 x 37 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

HELMUT NEWTON - Rue Aubriot, Paris 1975 - vintage gelatin silver print - 13 1/4 x 8 7/8 in.

HELMUT NEWTON

HELMUT NEWTON - Woman into Man, Hotel George V, for French Vogue, 1979 - gelatin silver print - 18 1/2 x 12 in.

HELMUT NEWTON

IRVING NORMAN - Prisoner - oil on canvas - 54 x 20 in.

IRVING NORMAN

GEORGE CONDO - Abstract Face - oil on board - 15 7/8 x 11 3/4 in.

GEORGE CONDO

IRVING NORMAN - Slum Youth - oil on canvas - 44 1/4 x 20 1/4 in.

IRVING NORMAN

HELMUT NEWTON - Portrait of Veruschka on the Terrace of the Presidential Suite, Hotel Meridien, Nice, 1975 - vintage gelatin silver print - 8 x 11 3/4 in.

HELMUT NEWTON

IRVING NORMAN - Striptease - pencil and colored pencil on paper - 30 x 20 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Wine Bottle - graphite on paper - 18 7/8 x 11 5/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - From Work - lithograph on paper - 20 x 25 in.

IRVING NORMAN