Palm Desert Gallery walkthrough

For our 25th anniversary, we are excited to continue presenting rare blue-chip artworks by esteemed artists like Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh, and Pablo Picasso. Over the past 25 years, Heather James Fine Art has expanded into a global network with galleries and consultancies across the US and Europe. In 2020 alone, Heather James Fine Art placed 382 artworks into new collections around the world, and we are proud to continue advising others in growing their collections.

ARTWORK CURRENTLY ON VIEW AT HEATHER JAMES PALM DESERT

BARNETT NEWMAN - Galaxy - oil on canvas - 24 x 20 in.

BARNETT NEWMAN

AD REINHARDT - Abstract Painting, 1959 - oil on canvas - 108 x 40 in.

AD REINHARDT

WINSLOW HOMER - The Shepherdess - oil on canvas - 22 3/4 x 15 3/4 in.

WINSLOW HOMER

FRIDA KAHLO - Hammer and Sickle (and unborn baby) - dry plaster and mixed media - 16 1/4 x 13 x 6 in.

FRIDA KAHLO

Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
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<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
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<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist.

FREDERICK FRIESEKE

"Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
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<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor."

JOAN MIRO

"...if a work of Sculpture has its own life and form, it will be alive and expansive, seeming larger than the stone or wood from which it is carved. It should always give the impression, whether carved or modeled, of having grown organically, created by pressure from within."
<br>-Henry Moore
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<br>"Reclining Figure: Circle" (1983) shows Moore's fascination with biomorphic abstraction, an approach he would have been drawn to in the work of his contemporaries, including Joan Miro and Jean Arp. Another example from this edition of nine is in the permanent collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

HENRY MOORE

JAMES ROSENQUIST - Television or the Cat's Cradle Supports Electronic Picture - acrylic on canvas over panel - 66 x 240 in.

JAMES ROSENQUIST

RICHARD PRINCE - Untitled (Cowboy) - c-print - 61 x 91 in.

RICHARD PRINCE

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG - Shuttle Buttle/ROCI USA (Wax Fire Works) - acrylic, fire wax, enamel, object on mirrored aluminum - 72 x 144 x 19 in.

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
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<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene.

N.C. WYETH

ANDY WARHOL - Triple Dollar Sign - acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas - 10 x 20 in.

ANDY WARHOL

KENNETH NOLAND - Passage - acrylic on canvas - 69 1/2 x 140 1/2 in.

KENNETH NOLAND

The Japanese Nio, or “benevolent kings,” are figures that were placed outside Buddhist temples, on each side of the entrance, to ward off evil spirits, demons, and thieves from the late Muromachi to early Edo periods — or roughly 1467 to 1652.
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<br>The Nio are Indian in origin — manifestations of Vajrapani Bodhisattvas. By some accounts, they protected the Buddha when he traveled throughout India. 
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<br>These figures are approximately 500 years old, according to carbon-14 dating conducted on the objects. They were once installed in a famous home that was photographed for the cover of a Frank Lloyd Wright book.
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<br>Each figure is named after a cosmic sound. The closed-mouth figure is Ungyo, who utters “un” or “om,” meaning death. He is also called Nareen Kongo and is said to be a form of the Indian god Vishnu. With his tightly closed mouth and tensed both arms, he represents latent might. The open-mouthed partner is Misshaku Kongo (Agyo), who sounds “ah,” meaning birth. He is equated to the Indian deity Vajrapani, whose name means “thunderbolt holder.” He bares his teeth, raises his fist, and holds a Kongosho, which is a symbol of the power he represents. 
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<br>The Nio are constructed in the traditional multi-block design. Old works were conventionally repaired bit by bit, over time, as individual blocks shrank at different rates or were damaged by insects. Damaged blocks were removed, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and replaced with exact copies of the piece. It is common to find figures with repairs spanning many years, as is the case with these particular pieces. This pair was originally lacquered. Though none of the lacquer survives, there is evidence of the gesso-like layer on the surface of each figure. 
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<br>It is interesting to note that this pair — each figure standing 71 inches tall — is a close copy of the Nio guarding the south gate of the Todaiji in Japan. However, the Todaiji pair, completed in 1203, stands 26 feet tall.
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<br>In both examples, the classic, fierce and threatening expressions punctuate their purpose as protectors of the Buddhist temple.

JAPANESE

TAKASHI MURAKAMI - Want to Hold You - acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on board - 59 x 59  in.

TAKASHI MURAKAMI

Combining sculptural elements on a canvas work, "Vanity Unfair for Gordon Matta Clark" evokes the experimental nature of the Pop Art movement. Created as a tribute to his close friend, Gordon Matta Clark, the present work is a layered creation, each element having significance and a deeper symbolic meaning.  
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<br>Starting as a commercial sign painter, Rosenquist learned the power of large-scale bold images. These large images, vibrant colors, and recognizable imagery would be the mainstay of Rosenquist's artistic output. "Much of the aesthetic of my work comes from doing commercial art," the artist once said. "I painted pieces of bread, Arrow shirts, movie stars. It was very interesting. Before I came to New York I wanted to paint the Sistine Chapel. I thought this is where the school of mural painting exists." 
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<br>Rosenquist's works are held in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the Tate Gallery in London, among many others.

JAMES ROSENQUIST

Irving Norman's masterpiece, "The Human Condition," from 1980, draws upon the artist's lifetime of acquired experiences and knowledge. Surviving as a volunteer fighter during the Spanish Civil War, the artist returned to the United States after the loyalist defeat. Upon his return, fervent studio practice in Half Moon Bay, California, would become his life's devotion.  
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<br>The present work, a nearly 16-foot-wide triptych, is reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch's triptych, "The Garden of Earthly Delights," c. 1510.  The dystopian vision portrayed in 'The Human Condition" is a warning - a lesson from the European dictatorships Norman experienced firsthand during the 1930s.   Disturbing tableaus show the darkness of humanity and the evil that can rise to prominence when humanity is at its worst.  There is hope, however, in the experience of the viewer: Norman thought of his audience as the greatest hope for humankind.

IRVING NORMAN

FRANK STELLA - The Musket - mixed media on aluminum - 74 1/2 x 77 1/2 x 33 in.

FRANK STELLA

JOSEF ALBERS - Study for Homage to the Square: "Blue Glow" - oil on masonite - 23 7/8 x 23 7/8 in.

JOSEF ALBERS

FRANK STELLA - Untitled - three dimensional mixed media on board, mounted on wood - 43 x 128 x 12 in.

FRANK STELLA

WINSLOW HOMER - Towing the Boat - watercolor and pencil on paper - 6 1/2 x 11 1/4 in.

WINSLOW HOMER

Jim Dine was an American Pop artist whose work meditated on objects with childlike appeal to find a universal and nostalgic language. Dine’s robes are among the most recognizable images to have emerged from his long and illustrious career. They were first shown at Sidney Janis gallery in the fall of 1964 – this is one such example. Double Silver Point Robes is a large-scale mixed media assemblage. The work is executed in silverpoint – a technique that utilizes a piece of silver as a drawing instrument over a specially prepared ground by which it oxidizes over a period of months to create a warm brown tone. The two joined canvases feature blocks of wood in place of where the heads should be and a hanging wood element that moves in response to air currents.

JIM DINE

"Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
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<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

LARRY RIVERS

DAMIEN HIRST - Overwhelming Love - household gloss, butterflies - 36 x 60 in

DAMIEN HIRST

Born on July 29, 1950, in Gallipolis, OH, Holzer received her BFA from Ohio University in 1972 and her MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1975. The artist fully embraces sculpture and mixed media works, seamlessly shifting from her monumental "word displays" to more intimate works such as "Survival: Hide under water…" (1989).  
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<br>Holzer's use of the red granite medium reframes the conversation about works of art in stone, a medium traditionally associated with antiquity and classical sculpture. The inclusion of typography and wordplay in this medium recalls a theme in Holzer's oeuvre, such as her renowned "Truisms" series, and expands the potential of language in art. Holzer is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art,  New York, where her "Granite Bench" (1986) is featured prominently in their sculpture garden.

JENNY HOLZER

JOSEPH STELLA - Reclining Nude - oil on canvas - 50 x 52 1/2 in.

JOSEPH STELLA

Gottlieb was a first-generation member of the Abstract Expressionists. “Blue on Black” is from his trademark “Burst” series. Like fellow Ab Ex artists including Pollock who settled into their signature style late in their careers, it was not until 1956 that Gottlieb focused on these burst paintings.
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<br>This painting showcases the lyricism that he found within the “Burst” paintings by simplifying color and form. In this painting, the shapes and color coalesce to produce harmony and depth within the visual landscape of the canvas.
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<br>Gottlieb had an amazing 56 solo exhibitions during his long career and his works are included in over 140 museums throughout the world.

ADOLPH GOTTLIEB

Deborah Butterfield is an American sculptor, best known for her sculptures of horses made of objects ranging from wood, metal, and other found objects. The 1981 piece, Untitled (Horse), is comprised of sticks and paper on wire armature. The impressive scale of this piece creates a remarkable effect in person, presenting a striking example of Butterfield's celebrated subject matter. Butterfield originally created the horses from wood and other materials found on her property in Bozeman, Montana and saw the horses as a metaphorical self-portrait, mining the emotional resonance of these forms.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD

"The Ash Blonde" (1918) has remained in the same private collection for nearly 30 years. A superb portraitist, Childe Hassam expertly captures the emotion and character of his subject in the present work. The sitter's facial expression is depicted with an accuracy and nuanced attention to detail that is reminiscent of the Dutch Old Masters, specifically Rembrandt. Painted just one year after his seminal masterpiece in the White House collection, "The Avenue in the Rain" (1917), this portrait is a brilliant counterpoint to the artist's cityscapes.  
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<br>Hassam is represented in numerous museum collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The National Gallery in Washington, D.C., The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and The Brooklyn Museum.

CHILDE HASSAM

Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
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<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
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<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819.

FERNANDO BOTERO

ALEXANDER CALDER - Woman with Square Umbrella - wood - 19 x 6 x 6 in.

ALEXANDER CALDER

Figurative painting in Post-War American art was a counterpoint to the prevalent trend of Abstract Expressionism. Artists like George Tooker added elements of Freudian psychology and psychological suspense in their visions of contemporary life. "Woman and Child" (2000) depicts one of the artist's favored subjects, the theatre loggia. The visual motif of a mother and child is analogous to the Madonna and Child, a prominent theme among Renaissance painters, and Tooker's egg-tempera medium evokes the formal aspects of Renaissance painting. 
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<br>Early studies at the Art Students League in New York served as the foundation for Tooker's mastery of the painting medium. His work is included in important museum collections, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

GEORGE TOOKER

Figurative painting in Post-War American art was a counterpoint to the prevalent trend of Abstract Expressionism. Artists such as George Tooker added elements of Freudian psychology and psychological suspense in their visions of contemporary life. The artist's signature egg-tempera medium used in "Moon Rise" evokes the formal aspects of Renaissance painting.  
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<br>Early studies at the Art Students League in New York served as the foundation for Tooker's mastery of the painting medium. His work is included in important museum collections, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

GEORGE TOOKER

ANDY WARHOL - Shoes with Diamond Dust 11.254 - screenprint in colors, diamond dust on arches aquarelle paper - 40 1/4 x 59 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Shoes with Diamond Dust 11.257 - screenprint in colors, diamond dust on arches aquarelle paper - 40 1/4 x 59 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

AMEDEO MODIGLIANI - Cariatide - blue crayon on buff paper - 24 x 18 in.

AMEDEO MODIGLIANI

Peaks of St. Gervais is one of the artist’s classic landscapes, with his distinctive swift brushstroke and charming town and structures — half of which he rendered in the shade — dwarfed by the snow-capped mountain. In most of his paintings, Payne used structures and figures not as subject, but to communicate the dramatic scale of mountain landscape. Drawn to the mountains of Europe, Payne trekked and painted the Swiss Alps, the colorful harbors of Brittany and France, and the sailing vessels in Italy.

EDGAR ALWIN PAYNE

N.C. WYETH - With a Quick, Noiseless Stride, He Crossed the Narrow Space - oil on canvas - 30 1/4 x 20 1/8 in.

N.C. WYETH

ANSELM KIEFER - Jericho - emulsion, acrylic, sand, clay and photographic paper on cardboard - 25 x 17 1/2 x 2.25 in.

ANSELM KIEFER

HERB ALPERT - Arrowhead - bronze - 201 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Freedom - bronze - 201 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

Ross Bleckner is a celebrated American painter whose works reference loss, memory, and change such as explorations of the cell during the AIDS epidemic or in response to his father’s cancer diagnosis. The 1965 MoMA exhibition that brought Op Art to the fore, The Responsive Eye and included artists Richard Anuszkiewicz, Tadasky, and Francis Celentano, had a profound influence on him as an artist. This painting, like his other immersive, large-scale works, elicit a powerful, hypnotic, dizzying effect. Aesthetically pleasing, Bleckner’s canvases explore perception – visual, emotional, physical, time. Bleckner is part of the same generation of and friends with Julian Schnabel, David Salle, Eric Fischl, and Peter Halley, all of whom returned painterly technique to the canvas.

ROSS BLECKNER

DONALD ROLLER WILSON - Looking For the Virgin in the Woods (What Is a Mother to Do With the Children Acting Bad) - oil on canvas - 30 x 86 1/2 in.

DONALD ROLLER WILSON

Ed Ruscha is one of the most distinguished American artists due in part for his explorations of the symbols of Americana and the relationship between language and art. The End is a cinematic theme that the artist used in the 1990s and 2000s, appearing in paintings, prints, and drawings – notably the 1991 large-scale painting at the Museum of Modern Art. Addressing the passage of time and obsolescence, Ruscha makes use of an antiquated typeface and an old cinematic tradition of using text in film. The concept of ephemerality is enhanced by the words themselves, The End, and the nature of the medium itself; considered futuristic when it was developed in the 1960s, the laser technology for holograms also creates a sense of impermanence as the images change with the viewer’s movement. While there is innate movement in the shifting words and images, these holograms also represent a full stop – a transitory moment frozen in time.

ED RUSCHA

Manuel Neri was a central figure in the Bay Area Figurative Movement in the 1960s. Instead of abstract forms, the group emphasized emotion through the power of the human form. The present work, "Untitled" (1982), explores the female form on a life-sized scale.  Neri preferred to work with just one model throughout his 60-year career, Maria Julia Klimenko. The absence of a face in many of the sculptures adds an element of mystery and ambiguity. The focus of the composition in "Untitled" is the structure and form of the figure.  Manuel Neri is represented in numerous museum collections worldwide, including the Addison Gallery/Phillips Academy; Anderson Collection at Stanford University; Art Institute of Chicago; Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University; Cincinnati Art Museum; Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA; Denver Art Museum, the El Paso Museum of Art, Texas; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Harvard University Art Museums; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Honolulu Museum of Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

MANUEL NERI

Takashi Murakami is one of the most celebrated contemporary and Japanese artists. Murakami developed the theoretical and visual language of “Superflat”. He based his art movement on the Japanese “flat” art aesthetic and of anime and manga fused with commentary on the Kawaii tendency in postmodern Japan.
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<br>Murakami and his art have chartered new ground in infiltrating and merging high and low culture. The painting features a proliferation of eyes in his trademark style. No two eyes are exactly alike, and each are in various states of opening or closing. Like his art, these eyes have hidden depth – the irises contain a multitude of miniature concentric circles. The painting seems to combine elements of pop culture, cartoons, technology, and fashion into a singular plane.

TAKASHI MURAKAMI

DAVID NOVROS - BARRANCA I - acrylic on canvas - 99 1/4 x 117 1/2 in.

DAVID NOVROS

Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure.

GEORGE CONDO

HERB ALPERT - Illumination - bronze - 159 x 40 x 40 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Radiance - bronze - 161 x 40 x 40 in.

HERB ALPERT

Afternoon Tea on the Terrace (1905-1906) was commissioned by Rodman Wanamaker as part of a mural for the Grand Deluxe Shelburn hotel in Atlantic City. The mural was later divided into seven pieces that were displayed in the hotel dining room. Frieseke’s earliest mural work was for his patron, Rodman Wanamaker. Other commissions included mural decorations that were installed in Wanamaer’s New York department store in 1904 and 1907, the Rodman Wanamaker Hotel in 1905, and the Amphitheater of Music in New York in 1908. Art historians credit Wanamaker’s constant commissions as being the sole reason Frieseke was able to devote himself to painting.

FREDERICK FRIESEKE

"Purple Tree" from 1936 shows the genesis of the artist's evolution into total abstraction. One of a series of Casein works on panel completed in 1936, the present work is fully documented and recorded in the Hans Hofmann Catalogue Raisonné. "Purple Tree" shows Hoffmann's "push/pull" color theory, where he placed warm and cool colors side by side. Hofmann was an influential instructor for Helen Frankenthaler, Joan Mitchell, Frank Stella, Lee Krasner, and Louise Nevelson (among many others).  
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<br>The 2019 exhibition "Hans Hofmann: The Nature of Abstraction" at the University Museum in Berkeley, California, featured 70 works and showed the evolution of Hofmann throughout his career.

HANS HOFMANN

Chicago native Robert Natkin was a leading abstract painter in the 20th century. Influenced by the colors and forms of Willem de Kooning, Pierre Bonnard, and Paul Klee, Natkin developed his own style of rich color and texture. This large-scale, jewel-toned canvas is a wonderful and rare early painting from a crucial period in American art, the 1950s. 
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<br>Associated with Abstract expressionism, Color field painting, and Lyrical Abstraction, Natkin's work threads throughout many major American art movements and cities. He received a retrospective exhibition in 1969 at the San Francisco Museum of Art (now SFMOMA), and completed a mural in New York at 1211 Avenue of the Americas, a corner of the Rockefeller Center, in 1992. Natkin is represented in over 24 museum collections worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

ROBERT NATKIN

Jennifer Steinkamp is at the forefront of the video art and conceptual art movements. "Judy Crook" (2013) is a monumental video installation work that depicts a tree's various seasons and forms. The enhanced images are larger than life, yet they do not dominate the space completely; you as the viewer are a welcome part of the installation. Steinkamp was recently included in the California Video exhibition at the Getty Museum in Los Angeles, and is poised to continue her groundbreaking studio work for decades to come.

JENNIFER STEINKAMP

Elliot Hundley earned his MFA at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2005. His intricate collages are often meant to represent imaginary "operas" and invented narratives. Hundley will use his close friends and family as models; this makes the work more immediate for the artist. 
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<br>"Untitled" is a large-scale collage that invokes a sense of whimsical fantasy.  These collage works are not cluttered, but instead are filled with dense symbology and narrative that has deep personal meaning for the artist.  
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<br>Hundley is included in many museum collections worldwide including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in Los Angeles.

ELLIOTT HUNDLEY

Harry Bertoia’s Willow sculpture resonates as an expression of grace and delicacy; qualities that bely the usual associations we have with the intrinsic properties of the alloy of which it is made. This suspended version – the rare version of Willow - seems to have a self-aware presence; one that delights in that contrast of properties. Yet it invites nothing more than existential pleasure in the viewing of it.  Think of Willow as a boldly articulated version of Calder if the latter master had a more organic or corporeal evocation in mind. Suspended, it commands its area yet respects its spatial relationship to its surround. Light, form, space – these are conceptual tools of the sculptor. But who else would think to use reflective material more readily associated with inflexibility and tensor strength to create a bouquet of cascading strands of stainless steel, suspended in space, flora-like and so gracefully beautiful?

HARRY BERTOIA

The Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD) was a prosperous cultural period that helped shape Chinese history's foundations for future centuries. This era was marked by notable technological and cultural advances, including gunpowder and printing. Among artistic advances during this period was the perfection of the sancai glaze technique, which was a prominent attribute of sculpture during this period. Sancai (tri-colored) glazing; the three glaze-colors used were ochre or brown, green and clear. Glazed wares where much more costly to produce than other terracotta wares, and were therefore only reserved for the wealthiest patrons.  
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<br>The Sancai-Glazed Earth Spirit offered here depicts a "Zhenmushou." These are mythical hybrid creatures whose bodies are a combination of dogs, lions, boars and other animals. These fierce looking beasts would be found in pairs guarding the entrance of Tang Dynasty tombs.

CHINESE

TAL R - Grim Kalding Fra Finland - acrylic, ink and paper collage on canvas - 67 3/4 x 55 in.

TAL R

Irving Norman was born in 1906 in Vilna, then part of the Russian Empire, now Lithuania. Norman's immigration to New York City in 1923 was short-lived, as he would return to Europe to fight as part of the Abraham Lincoln battalion against the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco. After the War, Norman would eventually settle in Half Moon Bay, California, where he embarked on a prolific studio practice.  
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<br>Norman's work portrays the horrors of war and his firsthand knowledge of totalitarian dictatorships. Norman's work has been described as "Social Surrealism," and his grand scenes are immediate and arresting. The large-scale works of Norman truly capture the power of his lived experiences; they are as much a visual record as they are a warning for the future, intended to inspire change.

IRVING NORMAN

CHUCK CLOSE - Self Portrait - suite of 4 glass holograms - 14 x 11 in. ea.

CHUCK CLOSE

HELMUT NEWTON - Rue Aubriot, Paris 1975 - vintage gelatin silver print - 13 1/4 x 8 7/8 in.

HELMUT NEWTON

ANDY WARHOL - Jean-Michel Basquiat Six Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

Irving Norman was born in 1906 in Vilna, then part of the Russian Empire, now Lithuania. Norman's immigration to New York City in 1923 was short-lived, as he would return to Europe to fight as part of the Abraham Lincoln battalion against the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco. After the War, Norman would eventually settle in Half Moon Bay, California, where he embarked on a prolific studio practice.  
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<br>Norman's work portrays the horrors of war and his firsthand knowledge of totalitarian dictatorships. Norman's work has been described as "Social Surrealism," and his grand scenes are immediate and arresting. The large-scale works of Norman truly capture the power of his lived experiences; they are as much a visual record as they are a warning for the future, intended to inspire change.

IRVING NORMAN

ANDY WARHOL - Joseph Beuys - screenprint on laundry bag - 55 1/8 x 39 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

WILLIAM WENDT - Laguna Hills - oil on canvas - 25 x 30 in.

WILLIAM WENDT

Pop Art rejected the Abstract Expressionism and non-objective painting that had dominated the American Art scene in the Post-War period.  Pop Artists took subject matter from advertising, popular culture, and daily life in America and elevated it to a high art form.  Alongside Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Tom Wesselmann, Jim Dine pioneered a new visual language and ensconced himself in art history for his contributions to the movement.  
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<br>As his family owned a hardware store, the earliest Dine "Pop" images depicted tools and hardware store items as subject matter. These works were studies on ordinary and universal images, hammers, wrenches, and other utilitarian objects.  It is perhaps his depictions of hearts and bathrobes for which Dine achieved the most significant praise; these images are highly sought after by Museums and collectors alike. “Walla Walla Heart on a Rock” (2005), from an edition of 8, presents the imagery from Dine's most recognizable monumental works at a scale that is more accessible for an interior space
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<br>Walla Walla Heart on a Rock (2005) demonstrated Dine's ability to use various media in his studio work. The present sculpture is a bronze casting from a small edition of just eight examples.  The bronze sculpture was a favorite medium of early 20th century artists such as Renoir and Rodin, and here Dine democratizes the medium and shares this universal symbol.

JIM DINE

Niki de Saint Phalle blazed a path in the art world and was one of the few female artists widely known for monumental sculpture. Her prolific oeuvre included an array of media, from architectural projects and sculpture gardens, to illustrated books, jewelry, films, set design, and perfume. Undoubtedly, the most celebrated of her sculptural works are those from the “Nanas” series of the mid-1960s and ’70s – large-scale figures embracing feminist ideology and presenting joyful and exuberant expressions of the female form. 
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<br>“Small Bull Totem” from 2000, completed just two years before her passing, represents de Saint Phalle’s riotous colors and whimsical forms at a more intimate scale. After her move from New York to San Diego in the 1990s, she experienced an artistic rebirth, explaining, “The sea, desert, mountains, wide-open sky, the brilliance of it and the vastness of space. I have embraced another way of life and have let my discovery of this land manifest itself in my work.” She began incorporating more fantastic creatures and animals in her works, including an extensive series of totems, ranging from small-scale works to monumental public installations, such as those that populate her final large-scale project, the sculpture garden “Queen Califa’s Magical Circle” in Escondido, California. Niki de Saint Phalle’s colorful, patterned sculptures are instantly recognizable and populate museums and public spaces worldwide.

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE

ARNE HIERSOUX - Mem Sahib - acrylic and paper on canvas - 70 1/2 x 120 1/2 in.

ARNE HIERSOUX

HELMUT NEWTON - Woman into Man, Hotel George V, for French Vogue, 1979 - gelatin silver print - 18 1/2 x 12 in.

HELMUT NEWTON

PETER SHELTON - onelongsleeve - metal - 29 1/2 x 47 3/4 x 10 1/2 in.

PETER SHELTON

Robert Natkin was a Chicago native that rose to prominence as a leading American painter in the 20th Century. Aklthough influenced by Abstract Expressionist artists such as Willem de Kooning, Natkin developed his own distinct style characterized by luscious color and texture. “Amethyst” (1960) is a strong representation of the artist’s work and was originally purchased directly from the artist’s studio in the 1960s.
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<br>Natkin's 1969 retrospective exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Art was an early acknowledgment of the artist’s importance. He is represented in over 24 museum collections worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

ROBERT NATKIN

RON ARAD - Big Easy Volume 2 - stainless steel welded chair - 37 1/2 x 53 x 31 in.

RON ARAD

Karl Benjamin was a fixture of the American West Coast School. His work was featured in the "Four Abstract Classicists" exhibition in 1959-60 at the San Francisco Museum of Art (now the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art) and the Los Angeles County Museum at Exposition Park (now the Los Angeles County Museum of Art) alongside Lorser Feitelson, John McLaughlin, and Frederick Hammersley. That exhibition was viewed as Los Angeles' answer to Abstract Expressionism as the West Coast artists' hard edge paintings offered an alternative style to the New York School's energetic brushwork and action painting.
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<br>Benjamin also had a prominent place in "Birth of the Cool: California Art, Design and Culture at Mid-Century," a 2007-09 national traveling show organized by the Orange County Museum of Art.

KARL BENJAMIN

The Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD) was a prosperous cultural period that helped shape Chinese history's foundations for future centuries. This era was marked by notable technological and cultural advances, including gunpowder and printing. Among artistic advances during this period was the perfection of the sancai glaze technique, which was a prominent attribute of sculpture during this period. Sancai (tri-colored) glazing; the three glaze-colors used were ochre or brown, green and clear. Glazed wares where much more costly to produce than other terracotta wares, and were therefore only reserved for the wealthiest patrons.  
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<br>The Sancai-Glazed Earth Spirit offered here depicts a "Zhenmushou." These are mythical hybrid creatures whose bodies are a combination of dogs, lions, boars and other animals. These fierce looking beasts would be found in pairs guarding the entrance of Tang Dynasty tombs.

CHINESE

HELMUT NEWTON - Portrait of Veruschka on the Terrace of the Presidential Suite, Hotel Meridien, Nice, 1975 - vintage gelatin silver print - 8 x 11 3/4 in.

HELMUT NEWTON

MAURICE GOLUBOV - City Nocturne - oil on canvas - 32 x 42 in.

MAURICE GOLUBOV

The Arts and Crafts Movement in Great Britain and the corresponding ripples that made their way across the Atlantic Ocean were felt in the work of Jesse Arms Botke (1883-1971).  Botke was born in Chicago, Illinois but found her home in California, where she had a successful career working first in Carmel and later in Southern California. 
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<br>Rich textures, extensive use of gold leaf, and highly stylized birds would become synonymous with Botke's mature work as she established herself as one of the West Coast’s leading decorative mural painters of the 20th century.
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<br>"The White Peacock" (1922) shows an idyllic landscape with Botke's signature bird subject matter; the white peacock and cockatoos were among her favorite aviary subjects. Her work today can be found in countless museum collections, including the Art Institute, Chicago.

JESSIE ARMS BOTKE

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE - Dos á Dos - painted polyurethane - 67 x 35 x 27 in.

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE

WILLIAM TUCKER - Tuche, Greek Goddess of Fortune - bronze - 12 x 9 x 14 in.

WILLIAM TUCKER

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait with Mask - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Any Warhol Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

DEWITT PARSHALL - Hermit Creek Canyon, Grand Canyon - oil on canvas - 40 3/4 x 50 in.

DEWITT PARSHALL

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE - California Nana - polyester resin - 13 x 7 3/4 x 7 in.

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE - The Couple - polyester resin - 12 x 8 x 7 in.

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE

CHINESE - Ink Painting - ink on paper - 46 x 75 1/2 in.

CHINESE

DAMIEN HIRST - The Souls on Jacob's Ladder Take Their Flight - color photogravure etching - 47 1/2 x 43 1/4 in.

DAMIEN HIRST

CHARLES REIFFEL - Mountain Camp - oil on board - 20 x 21 3/4 in.

CHARLES REIFFEL

ANDY WARHOL - Fiesta Pigs - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Shoes - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Self Portrait - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jean-Michel Basquiat in Soto Sculpture - silver gelatin print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Maurice the Dog Two Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol and Michael Jackson - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE - Crying Dog - acrylic on polyester resin - 4 7/8 x 5 x 9 1/4  in.

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER - Chair - oak, cow hide, formica, steel - 39 x 40 x 52 in.

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER - Chair - oak, cow hide, formica, steel - 39 x 40 x 52 in.

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER

ANDY WARHOL - Julian Schnabel 4 Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Donald Baechler - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

Irving Norman was born in 1906 in Vilna, then part of the Russian Empire, now Lithuania. Norman's immigration to New York City in 1923 was short-lived, as he would return to Europe to fight as part of the Abraham Lincoln battalion against the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco. After the War, Norman would eventually settle in Half Moon Bay, California, where he embarked on a prolific studio practice.  
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<br>Norman's work portrays the horrors of war and his firsthand knowledge of totalitarian dictatorships. Norman's work has been described as "Social Surrealism," and his grand scenes are immediate and arresting. The large-scale works of Norman truly capture the power of his lived experiences; they are as much a visual record as they are a warning for the future, intended to inspire change.

IRVING NORMAN

CLARENCE HINKLE - Rincon Vista - oil on board - 24 x 30 in.

CLARENCE HINKLE

IRVING NORMAN - Women Welders, The Ship - graphite on paper - 14 1/4 x 28 3/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

ANDY WARHOL - Bianca Jagger - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol - gelatin silver print - 10 x 8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

BENJAMIN BROWN - Poppy Fields, San Gabriel Valley - oil on canvas - 10 x 14 in.

BENJAMIN BROWN

CARL SAMMONS - Humboldt County Hills, California - oil on canvas - 24 x 30 1/4 in.

CARL SAMMONS

RAY STANFORD STRONG - Spring, Black Mountain, Marin County - oil on canvas - 24 x 44 in.

RAY STANFORD STRONG

MICAELA AMATO - Cameroon Girl - cast glass - 16 x 12  x 10 1/2 in.

MICAELA AMATO

ANDY WARHOL - Henry Geldzahler - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol and Janice Dickenson - silver gelatin print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS - Bronze Bouquet - metal - 15 1/4 x 7 x 7 1/2 in.

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS

Conflating, collapsing, augmenting historical and bodily narratives through a satirical point of view.

EDGAR SERRANO

ANDY WARHOL - Truman Capote - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy and Barbi Benton - unique silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Carolina Herrera - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Steve Rubell - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Sao Schlumberger - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Absolute Vodka - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Bruno Acampora - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Model - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jack Nicholson - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Ivan Karp - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Diana Vreeland - Polaroid - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Sonia Rykiel - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Grace Jones and Steve Rubell - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

THOMAS MCGLYNN - California Landscape - oil on canvas - 25 x 30 in.

THOMAS MCGLYNN

ZHANG HUAN - Foam (11) - chromogenic print - 44 1/2 x 33 in.

ZHANG HUAN

EDWARD STEICHEN - Eugene O'Niell - silver gelatin print - 13 x 10 in.

EDWARD STEICHEN

EDWARD STEICHEN - Gloria Swanson - silver gelatin print - 13 x 10 1/4 in.

EDWARD STEICHEN

EDWARD STEICHEN - Life Mask Of Abraham Lincoln - silver gelatin print - 13 1/4 x 10 1/4 in.

EDWARD STEICHEN

IRVING NORMAN - The Circus, Balancing Act 2 (a Study) - pencil on paper - 11 x 9 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - The Circus, The Balancing Act 2a (a Study) - pencil on paper - 11 x 9 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "The Immortality of Beethoven's 9th Symphony") - pencil on paper - 14 x 11  in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Bodies in Crypt) - pencil on paper - 7 1/2 x 3 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (War Study) - graphite on paper - 6 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Bodies) - pencil on paper - 6 3/4 x 2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Smoking Man) - pen on paper - 8 7/8 x 6 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Man with Fire Bird) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Couple) - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "Celebration") - graphite on paper - 4 7/8 x 3 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - pencil on paper - 11 x 14 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Head with Fire) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - pencil on paper - 11 x 14 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Abstract Heads) - pen on paper - 8 7/8 x 6 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "The Immortality of Beethoven's 9th Symphony" 2) - graphite on paper - 14 x 11 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Four Heads) - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

WOJCIECH FANGOR - White Ellipse - oil on canvas - 25 x 28 in.

WOJCIECH FANGOR

Noteworthy Exhibitions

DE KOONING X DE KOONING

November 8, 2018 – February 28, 2019 New York, NY

WONDERS OF IMPRESSIONIST AND MODERN ART IN AMERICA AND EUROPE

August 26, 2020 – February 28, 2021 Jackson Hole, WY

THE GLORIA LURIA COLLECTION

March 16, 2020 – February 28, 2021 Palm Desert, CA

ALEXANDER CALDER: BOLD GOUACHES

March 25, 2020 – February 28, 2021 New York, NY

Selected Artists We’ve Placed with Collectors in 2020

Claude Monet

Alexander Calder

Edward Hopper

Helen Frankenthaler

Camille Pissarro

Tracey Emin

Fernand Leger

Pablo Picasso

David Hockney

Andrew Wyeth

Grace Hartigan

Salvador Dali

Anish Kapoor

George Condo

Jean Arp

Vincent van Gogh

Andy Warhol

Robert Motherwell

Marc Chagall

Deborah Butterfield

Pat Steir

Raoul Dufy

Georgia O’Keeffe

Ed Ruscha

Elaine de Kooning

Mark Bradford

Ansel Adams

Norman Rockwell

Ai Weiwei

Carlos Cruz-Diez

  • CLAUDE MONET

    CLAUDE MONET

  • SALVADOR DALI

    SALVADOR DALI

  • ALEXANDER CALDER

    ALEXANDER CALDER

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