Back

ALEXANDER CALDER (1898-1976)

 
"Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. "Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.
Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)197643 x 107 x 45 in.(109.22 x 271.78 x 114.3 cm) painted steel
Provenance
Private Collection (commissioned directly from the artist)
Alexander Calder Estate (Pace Gallery)
Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California
Literature
Ed. Yona Fisher, Calder: The Jerusalem Stabile, Jerusalem: The Israel Museum, 1980. (ill.)
"Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)" is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A-12794. This piece is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Alexander Calder made. The 72-foot-long monumental sculpture was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was intended to serve as a symbol of modernity, to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, and to raise cultural awareness. Scaled versions have been exhibited around the world, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, the 2006 Public Art Fund exhibition entitled, “Alexander Calder in New York,” the University of Pennsylvania, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.
Inquire

“If you can imagine a thing, conjure it up in space then you can make it… The universe is real but you can’t see it. You have to imagine it. Then you can be realistic about reproducing it.” – Alexander Calder

History

Alexander Calder’s stabiles are a crucial element of the artist’s distinctive visual language. Fellow artist Jean Arp is credited with first using the term “stabile” to distinguish between Calder’s static sculptures and his kinetic sculptures, the “mobiles.” Though Calder’s hanging mobiles are some of his most iconic works, his giant sculptures act as landmarks in cities around the globe, speaking to the proliferation and continued public interest in Calder’s captivating forms.

This work is a maquette of the much larger Jerusalem Stabile, the last monumental sculpture that Calder ever made. The artist constructed a few maquettes – this piece being a unique work, not an editioned series – which were submitted to metal fabricators to construct the final large-scale installation. Calder worked closely with the fabricators to ensure the realization of his vision, though he did not live to see its completion. The manager of the fabrication company, Jacques Bazillon, explained Calder’s insistence that the sculpture be constructed without mechanical devices: “Thus, the finished work recalled in its execution the feeling of craftsmanship, and ‘the scars of workmanship’ remained visible” (“Calder: The Jerusalem Stabile”, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, 1980). The 72-foot-long, monumental piece was installed on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem in 1977 and was commissioned as part of a larger initiative to improve the quality of life in Jerusalem, to serve as a symbol of modernity and to raise cultural awareness.

More
  • calder-history1
    Alexander Calder, “Homage to Jerusalem” (1977) in Holland Square, near Mount Herzl in Jerusalem
  • calder-history2
    “Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette)” at the Biémont fabrication plant. Image from The Jerusalem Stabile, ed. Yona Fischer, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, 1980
  • calder-history3
    Calder’s “Flamingo” (1974) is a comparable monumental public installation in the Federal Plaza in Chicago
“My whole theory about art is the disparity that exists between form, masses and movement.” – Alexander Calder

MARKET INSIGHTS

  • Calder_Sculpture_all_time_AMR
  • Calder_sculpture_10_year_AMR
  • Calder’s market growth is remarkable even among his blue-chip peers
  • Prices for Calder’s best works have been strong for decades; demand for his art has globalized and supply is finite
  • No large Calder sculptures in his iconic red have come to auction in the last decade. 
  • This maquette, impressive in size, offers a more accessible price level than his even larger institutional-scale sculptures
  • As a maquette for Calder’s last project, Jerusalem Stabile is an important historical artifact

Comparable Sculptures Sold at Auction

"Sans Titre" (1963), painted steel, 135.8 x 131.5 x 78 in. Sold at Artcurial: 8 July 2020 for $5,604,303 USD
“Sans Titre” (1963), painted steel, 135.8 x 131.5 x 78 in. Sold at Artcurial: 8 July 2020 for $5,604,303 USD
  • Similar shape, but black
  • $5.6M last July, indicating high demand
  • Would have likely gone higher at a major auction house
"The Clove" (1970), painted sheet metal, 105.5 x 85 x 102.7 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 11 May 2011 for $3,890,500 USD
“The Clove” (1970), painted sheet metal, 105.5 x 85 x 102.7 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 11 May 2011 for $3,890,500 USD
  • The most recent large red Calder to come to auction
  • Same red but not his best-known arches
  • Sold for almost $4M ten years ago; his market has since doubled
"Untitled" (1963-1963), metal, 94.5 x 67 x 124 in. Sold at Sotheby’s New York: 14 November 2000 for $1,160,750 USD
“Untitled” (1963-1963), metal, 94.5 x 67 x 124 in. Sold at Sotheby’s New York: 14 November 2000 for $1,160,750 USD
  • Around the same size and format, but in black
  • Sold for over $1M, exceeding the estimate and a huge sum in 2000
  • Calder’s market as a whole has since increased 8-fold

Sculptures in Museums and Public Installations

"Homage to Jerusalem – Stabile (1977), steel, 72 feet long, Mount Herzl Jerusalem
“Homage to Jerusalem – Stabile (1977), steel, 72 feet long, Mount Herzl Jerusalem
"Maquette for the Jerusalem Stabile" (1976), painted steel, 17.3 x 38.6 x 21.7 in., Israel Museum Jerusalem
“Maquette for the Jerusalem Stabile” (1976), painted steel, 17.3 x 38.6 x 21.7 in., Israel Museum Jerusalem
"Jerusalem Stabile" (1979), painted steel, 90 x 144 x 174 ft., Penn Art Collection, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
“Jerusalem Stabile” (1979), painted steel, 90 x 144 x 174 ft., Penn Art Collection, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
"Stegosaurus (Intermediate maquette)" (1973), painted steel, 160 x 171 x 96 in., Toledo Museum of Art
“Stegosaurus (Intermediate maquette)” (1973), painted steel, 160 x 171 x 96 in., Toledo Museum of Art
Study for “The Crab” (1961), painted sheet metal, 20 1/8 x 40 x 20 ½ in., Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Study for “The Crab” (1961), painted sheet metal, 20 1/8 x 40 x 20 ½ in., Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
"Saurien" (1975), painted steel, 18 feet tall, Madison and 57th, New York, New York
“Saurien” (1975), painted steel, 18 feet tall, Madison and 57th, New York, New York
"La Grande Vitesse" (1969), painted steel, 43 x 30 x 54 ft., Vandenberg Plaza, Grand Rapids, Michigan
“La Grande Vitesse” (1969), painted steel, 43 x 30 x 54 ft., Vandenberg Plaza, Grand Rapids, Michigan
"Sandy’s Butterfly" (1964), painted stainless steel and iron rods, 152 x 110 x 102 ¾ in., Museum of Modern Art, New York
“Sandy’s Butterfly” (1964), painted stainless steel and iron rods, 152 x 110 x 102 ¾ in., Museum of Modern Art, New York

Image Gallery

Additional Resources

Watch: Alexander Calder’s Jerusalem Stabile at The Huntington
Read: ‘Jerusalem Stabile:’ The Big Red Structure Outside Meyerson
Read: “The Jerusalem Stabile” Published by the Israel Museum

Inquire

Inquire Alexander Calder

Similar Works