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THEASTER GATES (b. 1973)

 
THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in. THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in.
Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25201148 x 12 x 12 in. white concrete and porcelain
Provenance
Private Collection, Kavi Gupta
Private Collection, Puerto Rico

65,000

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In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
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<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others.

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Richard Prince is one of the most influential names in contemporary art. Prince is part of The Pictures Generation, a loosely associated group of artists who appropriated mass media imagery to examine and question issues of stereotypes, cultural tropes, and the constructed narrative of images. Prince and The Pictures Generation helped to usher in post-modernism in art.
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