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PAUL JENKINS (1923-2012)

 
Part of the post-war Abstract Expressionist movement, Paul Jenkins was renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew on wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy, and all of which inspired him to preface the titles of his works with the word “Phenomena,” followed by an evocative word or phrase. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” His combination of chance and control reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of colors, in other words, a phenomenon. Paul Jenkins was friends with Willem de Kooning and even took over de Kooning’s loft near Union Square in New York City. Part of the post-war Abstract Expressionist movement, Paul Jenkins was renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew on wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy, and all of which inspired him to preface the titles of his works with the word “Phenomena,” followed by an evocative word or phrase. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” His combination of chance and control reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of colors, in other words, a phenomenon. Paul Jenkins was friends with Willem de Kooning and even took over de Kooning’s loft near Union Square in New York City. Part of the post-war Abstract Expressionist movement, Paul Jenkins was renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew on wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy, and all of which inspired him to preface the titles of his works with the word “Phenomena,” followed by an evocative word or phrase. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” His combination of chance and control reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of colors, in other words, a phenomenon. Paul Jenkins was friends with Willem de Kooning and even took over de Kooning’s loft near Union Square in New York City. Part of the post-war Abstract Expressionist movement, Paul Jenkins was renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew on wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy, and all of which inspired him to preface the titles of his works with the word “Phenomena,” followed by an evocative word or phrase. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” His combination of chance and control reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of colors, in other words, a phenomenon. Paul Jenkins was friends with Willem de Kooning and even took over de Kooning’s loft near Union Square in New York City. Part of the post-war Abstract Expressionist movement, Paul Jenkins was renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew on wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy, and all of which inspired him to preface the titles of his works with the word “Phenomena,” followed by an evocative word or phrase. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” His combination of chance and control reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of colors, in other words, a phenomenon. Paul Jenkins was friends with Willem de Kooning and even took over de Kooning’s loft near Union Square in New York City. Part of the post-war Abstract Expressionist movement, Paul Jenkins was renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew on wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy, and all of which inspired him to preface the titles of his works with the word “Phenomena,” followed by an evocative word or phrase. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” His combination of chance and control reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of colors, in other words, a phenomenon. Paul Jenkins was friends with Willem de Kooning and even took over de Kooning’s loft near Union Square in New York City. Part of the post-war Abstract Expressionist movement, Paul Jenkins was renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew on wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy, and all of which inspired him to preface the titles of his works with the word “Phenomena,” followed by an evocative word or phrase. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” His combination of chance and control reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of colors, in other words, a phenomenon. Paul Jenkins was friends with Willem de Kooning and even took over de Kooning’s loft near Union Square in New York City.
Phenomena Silver Sinister196276 5/8 x 59 1/4 in. acrylic on canvas
Part of the post-war Abstract Expressionist movement, Paul Jenkins was renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew on wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy, and all of which inspired him to preface the titles of his works with the word “Phenomena,” followed by an evocative word or phrase. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” His combination of chance and control reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of colors, in other words, a phenomenon. Paul Jenkins was friends with Willem de Kooning and even took over de Kooning’s loft near Union Square in New York City.
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PROVENANCE:
<br>Acquired from artist California

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