Our gallery in Palm Desert is centrally located in the Palm Springs area of California, adjacent to the popular shopping and dining area of El Paseo. Our clientele appreciates our selection of Post War, Modern, and Contemporary art. The gorgeous weather during the winter months draws visitors from all over the world to see our beautiful desert, and stop by our gallery. The mountainous desert landscape outside provides the perfect scenic backdrop to the visual feast that awaits inside.

45188 Portola Avenue
Palm Desert, CA 92260
(760) 346-8926

Hours:
Currently open by appointment only

Exhibitions

Abstract Expressionism: Transcending the Radical
CURRENT

Abstract Expressionism: Transcending the Radical

January 12 - July 31, 2022
Andy Warhol Polaroids: Wicked Wonders
CURRENT

Andy Warhol Polaroids: Wicked Wonders

December 13, 2021 - June 30, 2022
Abstract Expressionism: The Persistent Women
CURRENT

Abstract Expressionism: The Persistent Women

November 1, 2021 - May 31, 2022
Andy Warhol: Glamour at the Edge
CURRENT

Andy Warhol: Glamour at the Edge

October 27, 2021 - April 30, 2022
Subtle Opulence
CURRENT

Subtle Opulence

September 8, 2021 - March 31, 2022
Sculpture for the Senses: Outdoor Sculpture
CURRENT

Sculpture for the Senses: Outdoor Sculpture

August 4, 2021 - January 31, 2022
Elaine and Willem de Kooning: Painting in the Light
CURRENT

Elaine and Willem de Kooning: Painting in the Light

August 3, 2021 - January 31, 2022
California Here We Come: The California Impressionists
CURRENT

California Here We Come: The California Impressionists

July 12, 2021 - January 31, 2022
A Beautiful Time: American Art in the Gilded Age
CURRENT

A Beautiful Time: American Art in the Gilded Age

June 24, 2021 - March 31, 2022
Everyone Needs a Fantasy: Pop Art in America
CURRENT

Everyone Needs a Fantasy: Pop Art in America

June 7, 2021 - February 28, 2022
James Rosenquist: Potent Pop
CURRENT

James Rosenquist: Potent Pop

June 7, 2021 - March 31, 2022
It Was Acceptable in the 80s
CURRENT

It Was Acceptable in the 80s

April 27, 2021 - March 31, 2022
Mercedes Matter: A Miraculous Quality
CURRENT

Mercedes Matter: A Miraculous Quality

March 22, 2021 - January 31, 2022
Moore! Moore! Moore! Henry Moore and Sculpture
CURRENT

Moore! Moore! Moore! Henry Moore and Sculpture

March 3, 2021 - January 31, 2022
Following Surrealism: Conceived with Fire
CURRENT

Following Surrealism: Conceived with Fire

March 2, 2021 - March 31, 2022
Pattern and Decoration: Feminism and Friendship
CURRENT

Pattern and Decoration: Feminism and Friendship

September 14, 2020 - January 31, 2022
Carlos Luna: Recent Works
CURRENT

Carlos Luna: Recent Works

August 11, 2020 - January 31, 2022
Max Pellegrini: Silence and Fantasy
CURRENT

Max Pellegrini: Silence and Fantasy

July 30, 2020 - January 31, 2022
The Rest So Beautiful: Contemporary Art and China
CURRENT

The Rest So Beautiful: Contemporary Art and China

May 12, 2020 - January 31, 2022
An Invisible State: Asian American Artists and Abstraction
CURRENT

An Invisible State: Asian American Artists and Abstraction

April 23, 2020 - January 31, 2022
Still Life, Still
CURRENT

Still Life, Still

April 10, 2020 - January 31, 2022
Norman Zammitt: The Progression of Color
CURRENT

Norman Zammitt: The Progression of Color

March 19, 2020 - March 31, 2022
Jae Kon Park: Life and Root
CURRENT

Jae Kon Park: Life and Root

March 12, 2020 - March 31, 2022
Paul Jenkins: Coloring the Phenomenal
CURRENT

Paul Jenkins: Coloring the Phenomenal

December 27, 2019 - March 31, 2022
Irving Norman: Dark Matter
CURRENT

Irving Norman: Dark Matter

November 27, 2019 - March 31, 2022
American Eye: Selections from the Pardee Collection
ARCHIVE

American Eye: Selections from the Pardee Collection

February 28 - December 31, 2021
Andy Warhol Polaroids: Ars Longa
ARCHIVE

Andy Warhol Polaroids: Ars Longa

December 10, 2020 - December 31, 2021
Andy Warhol Polaroids: Me, Myself, & I
ARCHIVE

Andy Warhol Polaroids: Me, Myself, & I

December 10, 2020 - December 31, 2021
The Cool School
ARCHIVE

The Cool School

March 30, 2020 - December 31, 2021
Jewish Modernism Part 2: Figuration from Chagall to Norman
ARCHIVE

Jewish Modernism Part 2: Figuration from Chagall to Norman

April 30, 2020 - December 31, 2021
Maurice Golubov
ARCHIVE

Maurice Golubov

October 1, 2020 - December 31, 2021
Andy Warhol Polaroids: Bring It to the Runway
ARCHIVE

Andy Warhol Polaroids: Bring It to the Runway

December 10, 2020 - December 31, 2021
Andy Warhol Polaroids: All That Glitters
ARCHIVE

Andy Warhol Polaroids: All That Glitters

December 10, 2020 - December 31, 2021
Our Most Viewed Art for the Month
ARCHIVE

Our Most Viewed Art for the Month

October 14 - November 14, 2021
The Gloria Luria Collection
ARCHIVE

The Gloria Luria Collection

March 16, 2020 - October 31, 2021
Modern Prints
ARCHIVE

Modern Prints

December 26, 2020 - June 19, 2021
Pop Figures: Mel Ramos and Tom Wesselmann
ARCHIVE

Pop Figures: Mel Ramos and Tom Wesselmann

March 26, 2020 - April 30, 2021
The Radical Line
ARCHIVE

The Radical Line

April 11, 2020 - January 31, 2021
Herb Alpert: Recent Works
ARCHIVE

Herb Alpert: Recent Works

September 28 - December 13, 2020
Jewels of Impressionism and Modern Art
ARCHIVE

Jewels of Impressionism and Modern Art

February 19 - October 31, 2020
Cool Britannia: The Young British Artists
ARCHIVE

Cool Britannia: The Young British Artists

April 2 - September 30, 2020
Weekly Opportunities
ARCHIVE

Weekly Opportunities

June 26 - August 31, 2020
Hassel Smith: The Measured Paintings
ARCHIVE

Hassel Smith: The Measured Paintings

February 12 - April 20, 2020
Mesa Modern
ARCHIVE

Mesa Modern

February 13 - February 29, 2020
The Californians
ARCHIVE

The Californians

November 1, 2019 - February 14, 2020
Opulent Minimalism
ARCHIVE

Opulent Minimalism

December 3, 2019 - January 31, 2020
Paul Jenkins and Robert Natkin
ARCHIVE

Paul Jenkins and Robert Natkin

November 1 - December 27, 2019
Morris Louis - The Early Paintings
ARCHIVE

Morris Louis - The Early Paintings

October 11 - November 30, 2019
Anselm Kiefer
ARCHIVE

Anselm Kiefer

August 15 - September 30, 2019
Paul Jenkins: Phenomenal
ARCHIVE

Paul Jenkins: Phenomenal

July 1 - August 31, 2019
Peter Shelton: A Thing You Bump Into
ARCHIVE

Peter Shelton: A Thing You Bump Into

July 16 - August 31, 2019
Alexander Calder: Cosmic Abstraction
ARCHIVE

Alexander Calder: Cosmic Abstraction

June 21 - August 30, 2019
Julian Schnabel
ARCHIVE

Julian Schnabel

June 4 - July 31, 2019
Hassel Smith
ARCHIVE

Hassel Smith

May 6 - June 30, 2019
Luc Bernard: Unconventional Borders
ARCHIVE

Luc Bernard: Unconventional Borders

May 3 - May 31, 2019
Sam Francis: From Dusk to Dawn
ARCHIVE

Sam Francis: From Dusk to Dawn

November 15, 2018 - April 29, 2019
Architectural Landscapes
ARCHIVE

Architectural Landscapes

December 1, 2018 - January 31, 2019
Sublime Abstraction
ARCHIVE

Sublime Abstraction

November 25, 2017 - May 31, 2018
Gregory Sumida: Americana
ARCHIVE

Gregory Sumida: Americana

April 5 - May 31, 2018
N.C. Wyeth: Paintings and Illustrations
ARCHIVE

N.C. Wyeth: Paintings and Illustrations

February 1 - May 31, 2018
Herb Alpert: A Visual Melody
ARCHIVE

Herb Alpert: A Visual Melody

February 17 - May 31, 2018
The Paintings of Sir Winston Churchill
ARCHIVE

The Paintings of Sir Winston Churchill

March 21 - May 30, 2018
Wojciech Fangor
ARCHIVE

Wojciech Fangor

November 25, 2017 - March 17, 2018
Edward S. Curtis
ARCHIVE

Edward S. Curtis

February 3 - March 17, 2018
Ferrari and Futurists: An Italian Look at Speed
ARCHIVE

Ferrari and Futurists: An Italian Look at Speed

November 21, 2016 - January 30, 2017
Alexander Calder
ARCHIVE

Alexander Calder

November 21, 2015 - May 28, 2016
Max Pellegrini: A Retrospective Exhibition
ARCHIVE

Max Pellegrini: A Retrospective Exhibition

November 27, 2015 - March 27, 2016
Masters of California Impressionism
ARCHIVE

Masters of California Impressionism

November 22, 2014 - May 23, 2015
Lawrence Schiller: Marilyn Monroe and Great Moments from the 60s
ARCHIVE

Lawrence Schiller: Marilyn Monroe and Great Moments from the 60s

November 23, 2012 - January 31, 2013
Painterly Abstraction: Spheres of AbEx
ARCHIVE

Painterly Abstraction: Spheres of AbEx

November 25, 2011 - May 31, 2012
Washi Tales: Works by Kyoko Ibe
ARCHIVE

Washi Tales: Works by Kyoko Ibe

December 11, 2011 - January 28, 2012
Masters of Impressionism and Modern Art
ARCHIVE

Masters of Impressionism and Modern Art

November 20, 2010 - September 25, 2011
Picasso
ARCHIVE

Picasso

November 20, 2009 - May 25, 2010

ARTWORK ON VIEW

AD REINHARDT - Abstract Painting, 1959 - oil on canvas - 108 x 40 in.

AD REINHARDT

GEORGIA O'KEEFFE - Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico - oil on canvas - 36 x 30 in.

GEORGIA O'KEEFFE

ALEXANDER CALDER - Jerusalem Stabile (Intermediate Maquette) - painted steel - 45 x 112 3/4 x 45 in.

ALEXANDER CALDER

WILLEM DE KOONING - Woman in a Rowboat - oil on paper laid on masonite - 47 1/2 x 36 1/4 in.

WILLEM DE KOONING

WINSLOW HOMER - The Shepherdess - oil on canvas - 22 3/4 x 15 3/4 in.

WINSLOW HOMER

Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
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<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
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<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist.

FREDERICK FRIESEKE

JOAN MIRO - Oiseau, insecte, constellation - oil on canvas - 50 3/4 x 38 1/8 in.

JOAN MIRO

JOAN MIRO - Tête de femme (déesse) - bronze with black patina - 66 x 36 1/2 x 30 in.

JOAN MIRO

TOM WESSELMANN - Bedroom Brunette with Irises - oil on cut-out aluminum - 108 x 120 in.

TOM WESSELMANN

JAMES ROSENQUIST - Television or the Cat's Cradle Supports Electronic Picture - acrylic on canvas over panel - 66 x 240 in.

JAMES ROSENQUIST

Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
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<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene.

N.C. WYETH

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG - Shuttle Buttle/ROCI USA (Wax Fire Works) - acrylic, fire wax, enamel, object on mirrored aluminum - 72 x 144 x 19 in.

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

SALOMON VAN RUYSDAEL - A Dune Landscape with Figures Resting and a Couple on Horseback, a View of Nijmegen Cathedral Beyond - oil on canvas - 26 1/2 x 41 1/2 in.

SALOMON VAN RUYSDAEL

JAN JOSEPHSZOON VAN GOYEN - River Landscape with a Windmill and Chapel - oil on panel - 22 1/2 x 31 3/4 in.

JAN JOSEPHSZOON VAN GOYEN

By the late 1950's, Henry Moore began experimenting with the theme of seated figures set against a wall backdrop.  "Girl Seated Against Square Wall" (1957-1958) is one of eleven sculptures in the "Wall" series; each sculpture varies according to the position and number of figures depicted. These works show a diorama-like depiction of the subject and are widely recognized as an important part of the artist's oeuvre.  
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<br>Moore's constant innovation and experimentation with his subject is why he is considered one of the great masters of the 20th Century. Another "Girl Seated Against Square Wall" (1957-1958)" can be found in the permanent collection of the Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, California.

HENRY MOORE

JAMES ROSENQUIST - Vanity Unfair for Gordon Matta Clark - oil on canvas - 62 3/4 x 43 x 2 3/4 in.

JAMES ROSENQUIST

Irving Norman's masterpiece, "The Human Condition," from 1980, draws upon the artist's lifetime of acquired experiences and knowledge. Surviving as a volunteer fighter during the Spanish Civil War, the artist returned to the United States after the loyalist defeat. Upon his return, fervent studio practice in Half Moon Bay, California, would become his life's devotion.  
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<br>The present work, a nearly 16-foot-wide triptych, is reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch's triptych, "The Garden of Earthly Delights," c. 1510.  The dystopian vision portrayed in 'The Human Condition" is a warning - a lesson from the European dictatorships Norman experienced firsthand during the 1930s.   Disturbing tableaus show the darkness of humanity and the evil that can rise to prominence when humanity is at its worst.  There is hope, however, in the experience of the viewer: Norman thought of his audience as the greatest hope for humankind.

IRVING NORMAN

FRANK STELLA - The Musket - mixed media on aluminum - 74 1/2 x 77 1/2 x 33 in.

FRANK STELLA

MAX PECHSTEIN - Damenbildnis (Charlotte Pechstein) - oil on canvas - 29 1/2 x 23 1/2 in.

MAX PECHSTEIN

ANDY WARHOL - Electric Chairs - screenprint - 35 3/8 x 47 7/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

Françoise Gilot was Picasso's muse and lover for nearly a decade beginning in 1946, the year he created this drawing. She became an iconic recurring image in the artist's work, reinvigorating his practice with a sense of joy after the dark period of World War II, and many of these portraits remained in his collection for the rest of his life. Picasso often drew Gilot from memory, thereby rendering her as more of a symbol or an ideal than as a model. As Michael Fitzgerald notes, “Picasso's portraits of Françoise were not drawn from life…unlike in the cases of Picasso's other wives and mistresses, there are almost none that reproduce her features strictly" (Michael Fitzgerald, "A Triangle of Ambitions: Art, Politics, and Family during the Postwar Years with Françoise Gilot," in Picasso and Portraiture, London, 1996, p. 416). On the significance of Gilot to this period for Picasso, Frank Elgar writes, "the portraits of Françoise Gilot have a Madonna-like appearance, in contrast to the tormented figures he was painting a few years earlier" (Frank Elgar, Picasso, New York, 1972, p. 123).

PABLO PICASSO

PABLO PICASSO - Poire et Pommes - watercolor on paper - 9 1/4 x 12 1/4 in.

PABLO PICASSO

Jim Dine was an American Pop artist whose work meditated on objects with childlike appeal to find a universal and nostalgic language. Dine’s robes are among the most recognizable images to have emerged from his long and illustrious career. They were first shown at Sidney Janis gallery in the fall of 1964 – this is one such example. Double Silver Point Robes is a large-scale mixed media assemblage. The work is executed in silverpoint – a technique that utilizes a piece of silver as a drawing instrument over a specially prepared ground by which it oxidizes over a period of months to create a warm brown tone. The two joined canvases feature blocks of wood in place of where the heads should be and a hanging wood element that moves in response to air currents.

JIM DINE

"Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
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<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

LARRY RIVERS

Born on July 29, 1950, in Gallipolis, OH, Holzer received her BFA from Ohio University in 1972 and her MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1975. The artist fully embraces sculpture and mixed media works, seamlessly shifting from her monumental "word displays" to more intimate works such as "Survival: Hide under water…" (1989).  
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<br>Holzer's use of the red granite medium reframes the conversation about works of art in stone, a medium traditionally associated with antiquity and classical sculpture. The inclusion of typography and wordplay in this medium recalls a theme in Holzer's oeuvre, such as her renowned "Truisms" series, and expands the potential of language in art. Holzer is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art,  New York, where her "Granite Bench" (1986) is featured prominently in their sculpture garden.

JENNY HOLZER

PABLO PICASSO - Deux femmes avec un vase a fleurs - linocut printed in color on Arches vellum paper with Arches watermark and linocut printed cream over - State I and II: 24 3/4 x 29 1/2 in. ; state IV: 24 1/2 x 29 1/2 in.; and 25 1/2 x 30 1/2 in.

PABLO PICASSO

WINSLOW HOMER - Towing the Boat - watercolor and pencil on paper - 6 1/2 x 11 1/4 in.

WINSLOW HOMER

The only known extant Diebenkorn sculpture, this welded iron form is a brilliant example of his artistic development and the creative energy of his early work. 
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<br>This rare sculpture comes from a period of experimentation and a burst of lyrical creativity that the artist experienced while in graduate school at the University of New Mexico. It was likely included in his 1951 Master's Degree Exhibition at that institution. Like many American artists before him, Diebenkorn was enthralled with the atmosphere and landscape of the Southwest. He produced energetic and unpredictable canvases with bold, warm colors, barely contained within their underlying geometric structure. This iron sculpture demonstrates the far reaches of the artist’s exploration, establishing the essential linear framework that would come to characterize his later work. 
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<br>This piece was the only sculpture included in the 2008 exhibition "Diebenkorn in New Mexico" at the UNM Harwood Museum of Art in Taos. Since his first retrospective in 1976 at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, Diebenkorn has found a place in over 50 museum collections worldwide and is recognized as a major creative force of the 20th Century.

RICHARD DIEBENKORN

Gottlieb was a first-generation member of the Abstract Expressionists. “Blue on Black” is from his trademark “Burst” series. Like fellow Ab Ex artists including Pollock who settled into their signature style late in their careers, it was not until 1956 that Gottlieb focused on these burst paintings.
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<br>This painting showcases the lyricism that he found within the “Burst” paintings by simplifying color and form. In this painting, the shapes and color coalesce to produce harmony and depth within the visual landscape of the canvas.
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<br>Gottlieb had an amazing 56 solo exhibitions during his long career and his works are included in over 140 museums throughout the world.

ADOLPH GOTTLIEB

JOSEPH STELLA - Reclining Nude - oil on canvas - 50 x 52 1/2 in.

JOSEPH STELLA

"The Ash Blonde" (1918) has remained in the same private collection for nearly 30 years. A superb portraitist, Childe Hassam expertly captures the emotion and character of his subject in the present work. The sitter's facial expression is depicted with an accuracy and nuanced attention to detail that is reminiscent of the Dutch Old Masters, specifically Rembrandt. Painted just one year after his seminal masterpiece in the White House collection, "The Avenue in the Rain" (1917), this portrait is a brilliant counterpoint to the artist's cityscapes.  
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<br>Hassam is represented in numerous museum collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The National Gallery in Washington, D.C., The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and The Brooklyn Museum.

CHILDE HASSAM

Mercedes Matter was an original member of the American Abstract Artists and an influential figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement. Alongside many of her fellow AbEx colleagues like Helen Frankenthaler and Lee Krasner, Matter studied under Hans Hoffman. The market for works by the historically undervalued AbEx women is increasing tremendously as their contributions to the movement gain overdue recognition. 
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<br>"Untitled" (1954-1955) comes from the height of the Abstract Expressionist movement. This painting is an explosive composition that demonstrates Matter's command of color and movement.

MERCEDES MATTER

Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
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<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united.

PAUL JENKINS

FERNANDO BOTERO - Dibujo a la manera de Velasquez - charcoal and pastel on cardboard - 60 1/2 x 47 1/2 in.

FERNANDO BOTERO

Françoise Gilot was Picasso's muse and lover for nearly a decade beginning in 1946, the year he created this drawing. She became an iconic recurring image in the artist's work, reinvigorating his practice with a sense of joy after the dark period of World War II, and many of these portraits remained in his collection for the rest of his life. Picasso often drew Gilot from memory, thereby rendering her as more of a symbol or an ideal than as a model. As Michael Fitzgerald notes, “Picasso's portraits of Françoise were not drawn from life…unlike in the cases of Picasso's other wives and mistresses, there are almost none that reproduce her features strictly" (Michael Fitzgerald, "A Triangle of Ambitions: Art, Politics, and Family during the Postwar Years with Françoise Gilot," in Picasso and Portraiture, London, 1996, p. 416). On the significance of Gilot to this period for Picasso, Frank Elgar writes, "the portraits of Françoise Gilot have a Madonna-like appearance, in contrast to the tormented figures he was painting a few years earlier" (Frank Elgar, Picasso, New York, 1972, p. 123).

PABLO PICASSO

NATHAN OLIVEIRA - Mask - acrylic, earth & oil on canvas - 66 x 54 in.

NATHAN OLIVEIRA

ALEXANDER CALDER - Woman with Square Umbrella - wood - 19 x 6 x 6 in.

ALEXANDER CALDER

Marc Newson is widely recognized as one of the most influential designers of our time.  His subjects range from seemingly ordinary objects such as bicycles to groundbreaking designs in furniture and airplanes.  The Philadelphia Museum of Art's 2013-2014 exhibition "Marc Newson: At Home" exposed a new American audience to Newson's futuristic aesthetic in a traditional museum setting.  
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<br>"Micarta Table" (2007) uses contemporary materials, including plastic composites, to create the illusion of a traditional wood veneer surface.  This blending of old and new is a hallmark of Newson's work.  Examples of Newson's work can be found in museum collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, New York City.

MARC NEWSON

Trained in a traditional setting at the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City, Diego Rivera initially rejected abstraction and other avant-garde artistic trends. During his trip to Paris in the 1910s, he discovered the work of Braque, Picasso, and others. This time in Paris had a profound impact on the young artist and set Rivera on a course to be one of the great 20th-century masters. Upon his return to Mexico in the 1920s, Rivera was heavily involved in the Mexican Mural project sponsored by the national government. Through these murals, Rivera would achieve international acclaim and significant commissions throughout the United States.  
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<br>This portrait of a woman is a delicate study, most likely drawn from life. Having been classically trained, Rivera relied upon a significant body of preparatory work before beginning a mural or oil painting on canvas. Sketches, drawings, and watercolors are an integral part of Rivera's process. A finished work in and of itself, this charcoal drawing is an exceptional example of the artist's depictions of the human form.

DIEGO RIVERA

Peaks of St. Gervais is one of the artist’s classic landscapes, with his distinctive swift brushstroke and charming town and structures — half of which he rendered in the shade — dwarfed by the snow-capped mountain. In most of his paintings, Payne used structures and figures not as subject, but to communicate the dramatic scale of mountain landscape. Drawn to the mountains of Europe, Payne trekked and painted the Swiss Alps, the colorful harbors of Brittany and France, and the sailing vessels in Italy.

EDGAR ALWIN PAYNE

Figurative painting in Post-War American art was a counterpoint to the prevalent trend of Abstract Expressionism. Artists like George Tooker added elements of Freudian psychology and psychological suspense in their visions of contemporary life. "Woman and Child" (2000) depicts one of the artist's favored subjects, the theatre loggia. The visual motif of a mother and child is analogous to the Madonna and Child, a prominent theme among Renaissance painters, and Tooker's egg-tempera medium evokes the formal aspects of Renaissance painting. 
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<br>Early studies at the Art Students League in New York served as the foundation for Tooker's mastery of the painting medium. His work is included in important museum collections, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

GEORGE TOOKER

Figurative painting in Post-War American art was a counterpoint to the prevalent trend of Abstract Expressionism. Artists such as George Tooker added elements of Freudian psychology and psychological suspense in their visions of contemporary life. The artist's signature egg-tempera medium used in "Moon Rise" evokes the formal aspects of Renaissance painting.  
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<br>Early studies at the Art Students League in New York served as the foundation for Tooker's mastery of the painting medium. His work is included in important museum collections, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

GEORGE TOOKER

HERB ALPERT - Arrowhead - bronze - 201 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Freedom - bronze - 201 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

Richard Pousette-Dart was one of the youngest members of the first generation of Abstract Expressionism, the movement of non-representational art that placed primacy on the artist’s emotion and mark making. Pousette-Dart was also part of “The Irascibles”, the group with the movement that protested the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition “American Painting Today – 1950”.
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<br>Pousette-Dart’s longevity allowed him to develop his approach to painting, moving away from expressing gestural strokes into applying intuitive points of paint. This work, particularly the titular circle, is a careful riot of points that Pousette-Dart has layered through different colors. While still maintaining the raw energy of early AbEx works, Pousette-Dart creates a more spiritual vision

RICHARD POUSETTE-DART

N.C. WYETH - With a Quick, Noiseless Stride, He Crossed the Narrow Space - oil on canvas - 30 1/4 x 20 1/8 in.

N.C. WYETH

Manuel Neri was a central figure in the Bay Area Figurative Movement in the 1960s. Instead of abstract forms, the group emphasized emotion through the power of the human form. The present work, "Untitled" (1982), explores the female form on a life-sized scale.  Neri preferred to work with just one model throughout his 60-year career, Maria Julia Klimenko. The absence of a face in many of the sculptures adds an element of mystery and ambiguity. The focus of the composition in "Untitled" is the structure and form of the figure.  Manuel Neri is represented in numerous museum collections worldwide, including the Addison Gallery/Phillips Academy; Anderson Collection at Stanford University; Art Institute of Chicago; Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University; Cincinnati Art Museum; Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA; Denver Art Museum, the El Paso Museum of Art, Texas; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Harvard University Art Museums; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Honolulu Museum of Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

MANUEL NERI

Willem de Kooning is one of the towering figures of Abstract Expressionism. The movement focused on non-representational art that placed primacy on the artist’s emotion and mark making. While one of the pioneers of the AbEx movement and a leader within “The Irascibles”, pure abstraction did not much interest de Kooning.
<br>
<br> “Wow” presents not just free movement of the brush but the power of de Kooning to sculpt color on a flat plane. Despite seeming to be a near complete abstraction of paint and form, de Kooning creates an interplay between the color and the brushstrokes and the text of the newsprint

WILLEM DE KOONING

Takashi Murakami is one of the most celebrated contemporary and Japanese artists. Murakami developed the theoretical and visual language of “Superflat”. He based his art movement on the Japanese “flat” art aesthetic and of anime and manga fused with commentary on the Kawaii tendency in postmodern Japan.
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<br>Murakami and his art have chartered new ground in infiltrating and merging high and low culture. The painting features a proliferation of eyes in his trademark style. No two eyes are exactly alike, and each are in various states of opening or closing. Like his art, these eyes have hidden depth – the irises contain a multitude of miniature concentric circles. The painting seems to combine elements of pop culture, cartoons, technology, and fashion into a singular plane.

TAKASHI MURAKAMI

DAVID NOVROS - BARRANCA I - acrylic on canvas - 99 1/4 x 117 1/2 in.

DAVID NOVROS

LEE KRASNER - Water No. 5 - gouache on howell paper - 12 1/4 x 9 1/4 in.

LEE KRASNER

Deborah Butterfield is an American sculptor, best known for her sculptures of horses made of objects ranging from wood, metal, and other found objects. The 1981 piece, Untitled (Horse), is comprised of sticks and paper on wire armature. The impressive scale of this piece creates a remarkable effect in person, presenting a striking example of Butterfield's celebrated subject matter. Butterfield originally created the horses from wood and other materials found on her property in Bozeman, Montana and saw the horses as a metaphorical self-portrait, mining the emotional resonance of these forms.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD

HERB ALPERT - Illumination - bronze - 159 x 40 x 40 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Radiance - bronze - 161 x 40 x 40 in.

HERB ALPERT

Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure.

GEORGE CONDO

Harry Bertoia’s Willow sculpture resonates as an expression of grace and delicacy; qualities that bely the usual associations we have with the intrinsic properties of the alloy of which it is made. This suspended version – the rare version of Willow - seems to have a self-aware presence; one that delights in that contrast of properties. Yet it invites nothing more than existential pleasure in the viewing of it.  Think of Willow as a boldly articulated version of Calder if the latter master had a more organic or corporeal evocation in mind. Suspended, it commands its area yet respects its spatial relationship to its surround. Light, form, space – these are conceptual tools of the sculptor. But who else would think to use reflective material more readily associated with inflexibility and tensor strength to create a bouquet of cascading strands of stainless steel, suspended in space, flora-like and so gracefully beautiful?

HARRY BERTOIA

Few painters have a mythology as large or as complicated as Mark Rothko. One of the most important Abstract Expressionist artists and a quintessential Color Field artist, Rothko imbued his canvases with symbolic and spiritual meaning.
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<br>Before this break into complete abstraction, Rothko created expressionistic and figurative works influenced by his friendship with the painter Arshile Gorky. This early work from the 1930s gives a crucial glimpse into the development of Rothko before he transferred the emotion of figuration into the emotion of color. He admired the approach of children to art which he emulated through broad applications of paint and wide brushwork which can be seen in this piece.

MARK ROTHKO

Elliot Hundley earned his MFA at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2005. His intricate collages are often meant to represent imaginary "operas" and invented narratives. Hundley will use his close friends and family as models; this makes the work more immediate for the artist. 
<br>
<br>"Untitled" is a large-scale collage that invokes a sense of whimsical fantasy.  These collage works are not cluttered, but instead are filled with dense symbology and narrative that has deep personal meaning for the artist.  
<br>
<br>Hundley is included in many museum collections worldwide including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in Los Angeles.

ELLIOTT HUNDLEY

"Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

HENRI MANGUIN

Chicago native Robert Natkin was a leading abstract painter in the 20th century. Influenced by the colors and forms of Willem de Kooning, Pierre Bonnard, and Paul Klee, Natkin developed his own style of rich color and texture. This large-scale, jewel-toned canvas is a wonderful and rare early painting from a crucial period in American art, the 1950s. 
<br>
<br>Associated with Abstract expressionism, Color field painting, and Lyrical Abstraction, Natkin's work threads throughout many major American art movements and cities. He received a retrospective exhibition in 1969 at the San Francisco Museum of Art (now SFMOMA), and completed a mural in New York at 1211 Avenue of the Americas, a corner of the Rockefeller Center, in 1992. Natkin is represented in over 24 museum collections worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

ROBERT NATKIN

Mercedes Matter was an original member of the American Abstract Artists and an influential figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement. Alongside many of her fellow AbEx colleagues like Helen Frankenthaler and Lee Krasner, Matter studied under Hans Hoffman. The market for works by the historically undervalued AbEx women is increasing tremendously as their contributions to the movement gain overdue recognition. 
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<br>"Untitled" 2001 was Matter's final painting. It was still on her easel when she passed. Matter used visual sources for her paintings, such as the traditional still life, but deconstructed the objects into complete abstraction, maintaining a focus on capturing the energy and relationship between objects and spaces.

MERCEDES MATTER

ANDY WARHOL - Jean-Michel Basquiat Six Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

Irving Norman was born in 1906 in Vilna, then part of the Russian Empire, now Lithuania. Norman's immigration to New York City in 1923 was short-lived, as he would return to Europe to fight as part of the Abraham Lincoln battalion against the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco. After the War, Norman would eventually settle in Half Moon Bay, California, where he embarked on a prolific studio practice.  
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<br>Norman's work portrays the horrors of war and his firsthand knowledge of totalitarian dictatorships. Norman's work has been described as "Social Surrealism," and his grand scenes are immediate and arresting. The large-scale works of Norman truly capture the power of his lived experiences; they are as much a visual record as they are a warning for the future, intended to inspire change.

IRVING NORMAN

Although the Warhol of the 1980s is associated with excess and celebrity, the decade was perhaps one of his most insightful into fame, infamy, art, and society. The Pop provocateur produced, at an astonishing rate, works that mined these themes. This work featuring a repeated portrait of German artist Joseph Beuys was most likely based off a single Polaroid that Warhol took of Beuys in 1979.
<br>
<br>Joseph Beuys was one of the most important contemporary artists whose work expanded the meaning of art through his performances and unconventional artworks that incorporated unusual but pointed material.
<br>
<br>This piece represents the meeting between Beuys and Warhol, the union of two titans of art coming from a distinctly European and American point of view. Both artists shared an admiration for each other despite their different approaches to art. What the two shared was the ability to reflect society back onto itself and their ability to self-mythologize.

ANDY WARHOL

DIEGO RIVERA - Set Design for the Carlos Chavez Ballet “HP” - pencil on paper - 12 1/2 x 18 5/8  in.

DIEGO RIVERA

Niki de Saint Phalle blazed a path in the art world and was one of the few female artists widely known for monumental sculpture. Her prolific oeuvre included an array of media, from architectural projects and sculpture gardens, to illustrated books, jewelry, films, set design, and perfume. Undoubtedly, the most celebrated of her sculptural works are those from the “Nanas” series of the mid-1960s and ’70s – large-scale figures embracing feminist ideology and presenting joyful and exuberant expressions of the female form. 
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<br>“Small Bull Totem” from 2000, completed just two years before her passing, represents de Saint Phalle’s riotous colors and whimsical forms at a more intimate scale. After her move from New York to San Diego in the 1990s, she experienced an artistic rebirth, explaining, “The sea, desert, mountains, wide-open sky, the brilliance of it and the vastness of space. I have embraced another way of life and have let my discovery of this land manifest itself in my work.” She began incorporating more fantastic creatures and animals in her works, including an extensive series of totems, ranging from small-scale works to monumental public installations, such as those that populate her final large-scale project, the sculpture garden “Queen Califa’s Magical Circle” in Escondido, California. Niki de Saint Phalle’s colorful, patterned sculptures are instantly recognizable and populate museums and public spaces worldwide.

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE

ARNE HIERSOUX - Mem Sahib - acrylic and paper on canvas - 70 1/2 x 120 1/2 in.

ARNE HIERSOUX

PETER SHELTON - onelongsleeve - metal - 29 1/2 x 47 3/4 x 10 1/2 in.

PETER SHELTON

Robert Natkin was a Chicago native that rose to prominence as a leading American painter in the 20th Century. Aklthough influenced by Abstract Expressionist artists such as Willem de Kooning, Natkin developed his own distinct style characterized by luscious color and texture. “Amethyst” (1960) is a strong representation of the artist’s work and was originally purchased directly from the artist’s studio in the 1960s.
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<br>Natkin's 1969 retrospective exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Art was an early acknowledgment of the artist’s importance. He is represented in over 24 museum collections worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

ROBERT NATKIN

RON ARAD - Big Easy Volume 2 - stainless steel welded chair - 37 1/2 x 53 x 31 in.

RON ARAD

JUDITH GODWIN - Rocks - acrylic on canvas - 36  x 46 in.

JUDITH GODWIN

“Painting is a need, not a choice.” – Leonora Carrington
<br>
<br>Leonora Carrington was a key figure of Surrealism, the art movement that used the human subconscious to create dreamlike and fantastical scenes. Carrington was born in the England in 1917. Rebellious and artistic as a child, she eventually met Max Ernst, one of the leaders of Surrealism, with whom she would move to Paris. The outbreak of WWII interrupted their relationship as Ernst fled to the U.S. while Carrington escaped the Nazis to Madrid where she was institutionalized. She fled again with her new husband, a Mexican diplomat, to New York where they divorced, and she moved a final time to Mexico City. It was in Mexico City that she flourished with her Surrealist paintings, making friends with fellow artists including Remedios Varo, and where she would find fame, exhibiting in prestigious shows at the Museum of Modern Art and Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of This Century Gallery.
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<br>Carrington’s paintings are populated by strange humans and fantastical animals pulling from myths, mysticism, and her own imagination. Running through her works are ideas of transformation and a divine feminine quality. This work features a figure setting down an unusual prayer rug. The title is reference to an Arabic and Persian word meaning “statement” or “exposition” and could also be a reference to the work of Báb, a central figure of the Baha’I faith. The word points to a clarity of eloquence, much as Carrington strived for that same eloquence and clarity of expression.

LEONORA CARRINGTON

ANDY WARHOL - Campbell's Soup Can (Tomato) - screenprint in colors on colored t-shirt - 29 x 26 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE - Dos á Dos - painted polyurethane - 67 x 35 x 27 in.

NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE

Barnett Newman was a crucial member of the Abstract Expressionists and a pioneer within the Color Field movement. Through a careful selection of color, hues, and composition, Newman applied paint to create planes of color that developed into deep emotion and feeling.
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<br>This work comes from Newman’s portfolio, “18 Cantos”, his fourth foray into lithography. Lithography is a type of printmaking that utilizes flat stones. Images are affixed onto the stone via chemical processes. A complicated practice, lithography allowed Newman to showcase his affinity by creating a series of subtle but joyous pieces. The viewer can see delicate differences of texture and tone. Even when the same stone has been used, the difference of ink creates stark changes of tonality and surface quality. This speaks to the title of the works – sections of a larger poem.
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<br>Other editions of “Canto XIII” can be found at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), and the Tate Collection (London).

BARNETT NEWMAN

ANDY WARHOL - Shoes - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

HENRY MOORE - Emperor's Heads - bronze with brown patina - 6 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 4 1/2 in.

HENRY MOORE

ANDY WARHOL - Any Warhol Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Julian Schnabel 4 Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait with Mask - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Sao Schlumberger - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Absolute Vodka - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jack Nicholson - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Fiesta Pigs - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Self Portrait - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ZAHA HADID - Untitled - metal and plexiglass - 35 3/4 x 16 1/4 x 16 1/4 in.

ZAHA HADID

ANDY WARHOL - Jean-Michel Basquiat in Soto Sculpture - silver gelatin print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Maurice the Dog Two Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol and Michael Jackson - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Bruno Acampora - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

PABLO PICASSO - Couple au bord de l'eau - drypoint on Arches laid paper - 9 3/8 x 12 in.

PABLO PICASSO

ANDY WARHOL - Donald Baechler - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

IRVING NORMAN - Women Welders, The Ship - graphite on paper - 14 1/4 x 28 3/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

ANDY WARHOL - Carolina Herrera - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol - gelatin silver print - 10 x 8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Paloma Picasso - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

PABLO PICASSO - La Danse - white eathenware ceramic plate, partially engraved, with colored engobe and glaze - 12 1/2 x 15 in.

PABLO PICASSO

“It is the mysterious that I love in painting. It is the stillness and the silence. I want my pictures to take effect very slowly, to obsess and to haunt.” – William Baziotes
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<br>William Baziotes was an important member of Abstract Expressionism, the movement of non-representational art concerned with the artist’s emotive mark making. Also part of The Irascibles, a subsection of AbEx artists who protested the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Baziotes incorporated biomorphic shapes, a nod to his early Surrealist investigations.
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<br>In this piece, Baziotes makes full effect of watercolor, using its translucency and fluidity to create lyrical passages of color and forms.

WILLIAM BAZIOTES

MICAELA AMATO - Cameroon Girl - cast glass - 16 x 12  x 10 1/2 in.

MICAELA AMATO

ANDY WARHOL - Henry Geldzahler - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol and Janice Dickenson - silver gelatin print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy and Barbi Benton - unique silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Ivan Karp - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

Born January 2, 1969, Pinar del Río, Cuba
<br>Left Cuba in 1991
<br>Lived in Puebla, Mexico between 1991 and 2002
<br>Resides in the U.S. since 2002 with his wife and their three children
<br>
<br>
<br>E D U C A T I O N  
<br>
<br>1987-91	Visual Arts College (Instituto Superior de Arte), Havana
<br>1984-87	National School of the Arts (Escuela Nacional de Artes Plasticas, ENAP), Havana
<br>1983-84	Academia de San Alejandro, Havana
<br>1980-83	School of Visual Arts (Escuela Provincial de Artes Plasticas), Pinar del Río, Cuba
<br>
<br>
<br>S O L O   E X H I B I T I O N S
<br>
<br>2009	· Pablo Picasso Ceramics | Carlos Luna Paintings; Complejo Cultural Universitario BUAP, Puebla, Mexico *
<br>	· Pablo Picasso Ceramics | Carlos Luna Paintings; Miramar Cultural Center - Artspark, Miramar, FL*
<br>
<br>2008	· Pablo Picasso Ceramics | Carlos Luna Paintings; Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale, FL *
<br>· Carlos Luna: El Gran Mambo; American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington, DC *
<br>· Carlos Luna: El Gran Mambo; Museum of Latin American Art – Molaa, Long Beach, CA *
<br>
<br>2007	· Carlos Luna: Personal Histories; (Oil paintings) Susquehanna Art Museum, Harrisburg, PA *
<br>· Carlos Luna: Personal Histories; (Works on amate paper) The Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery, Lebanon Valley Collage, Annville, PA *
<br>· Carlos Luna: Personal Histories; (Oils and works on amate paper) Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland, FL *
<br>· Art Santa Fe; Osuna Art, Washington, DC *
<br>
<br>2006	· Naci pa’ ser feliz; Gomez Fine Art-Galeria, San Juan, PR *
<br>
<br>2005	· Retratos de Carlos Luna; Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, FL *
<br>· Carlos Luna; Leonard Tachmes Gallery, Miami, FL 
<br>
<br>2001	· Paso a Paso; Museo Poblano de Arte Virreinal, Puebla, Mexico *
<br>
<br>1998	· Women of Sensuality; Amalia Mahoney Gallery, Chicago, IL
<br>· Presencia de Carlos Luna; Casa de la Cultura, Puebla, Mexico
<br>
<br>1997	· Yo traigo de Todo; Casa de los Muñecos, University Museum, Puebla, Mexico *
<br>	· Carlos Luna; Oscar Roman Gallery, Mexico DF
<br>
<br>1996	· Entre Gallos y Mujeres; Amalia Mahoney Gallery, Chicago, IL
<br>
<br>1995	· Mi Madre, Mi Patria; Museo Amparo, Puebla, Mexico *
<br>
<br>1994	· El Bestiario II; Claustro de Sor Juana, Mexico DF *
<br>
<br>1993	· El Bestiario; Javier Lumbreras Fine Arts, Coral Gables, Florida, USA *
<br>
<br>1992	· El Fuego Secreto; La Casita Gallery, Mexico DF
<br>
<br>1987	· Imágenes del Paraíso; Escuela Nacional de Artes Plasticas Gallery, Havana
<br>
<br>1986	· Carlos Luna II; Atilano Armenteros Ramos Gallery, San Luis, Pinar del Rio, Cuba
<br>
<br>1984	· Carlos Luna; Atilano Armenteros Ramos Gallery, San Luis, Pinar del Rio, Cuba
<br>
<br>
<br>G R O U P   E X H I B I T I O N S
<br>
<br>2010	· !Si Cuba!; New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA
<br>	· !Latinas!; Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, NY
<br>
<br>2009	· Latinamerican Art: Classic to Contemporary; Heather James Fine Art, Palm Desert, CA
<br>	· Latin American Painting Now (Pintura Latino Americana de Ahora) Naples 	Museum of Art, Naples, FL
<br>
<br>2008	· Art in Embassies Program, United States Embassy Santiago, Chile, 2008-2011 *
<br>· Unbroken Ties: Dialogues in Cuban Art; Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale, FL *
<br>· Visiones: 20th Century Selections from the Nassau County Museum of Art; Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL 
<br>· Art Santa Fe; Osuna Art, Washington, DC
<br>
<br>2007	· Latin American Art: Myth & Reality; Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, NY
<br>· Art Miami; Gomez Fine Art-Galeria, San Juan, PR *
<br>· Arte Americas; Maxioli Gallery, Miami, FL *
<br>	· Group Show. Latin American Art Gallery; Scottsdale, Arizona
<br>	· Alarca, Talavera Contemporanea; El Museo Franz Mayer, Mexico DF *
<br>
<br>2006	· Unbroken Ties: Dialogues in Cuban Art; Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA *
<br>	· Diversidades. Del Caribe al Sur; Gomez Fine Art-Galeria, San Juan, PR
<br>· Group show; Lurie Fine Art Galleries, Miami, FL
<br>
<br>2005	· Figuratively Speaking; Miami Art Museum, Miami, FL
<br>· Arte Americas; George Billis Gallery, Convention Center, Miami, FL *
<br>· Works on paper; Osuna Art, Bethesda, Maryland 
<br>· Wet; Edge Zones, Worlds Art Building, North Miami, FL *
<br>· Growth Spurt; Edge Zones. Worlds Art Building, North Miami, FL
<br>
<br>2004 	· "Latin Visions": A Collector's Insight; Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, NY	
<br>· Scope Miami, Art Basel. Townhouse Hotel; Leonard Tachmes Gallery, Miami, FL
<br>· It’s for the Birds; Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, Miami, FL *
<br>	· Summer Miami; Leonard Tachmes Gallery, Miami, FL
<br>	· TONDO; Galeria Botello, Hato Rey, PR
<br>· Art Miami; Latin Collector Gallery, Miami, FL *
<br>	· Erase una vez en Mexico; Institute of Mexico in Miami, Miami, FL
<br>· American Dream; The Olga M. & Carlos Saladrigas Gallery,The Ignatian
<br>Center for the Arts, Miami, FL *
<br>· The Soul of Latin American Art; Lurie Fine Art Galleries, Boca Raton, FL
<br>	
<br>2003   	· Transfiguration; Palazzo Mediceo-Seravezza, Italy *
<br>	· Group Show; Latin Collector, New York, NY
<br>	· Group Show; Jorge M. Sori Fine Art, Miami, FL
<br>	· Affordable Art Fair; Latin Collector Gallery, New York, NY
<br>· Second Year Anniversary Exhibition; Leonard Tachmes Gallery, Miami, FL
<br>
<br>2001 · Pequeño Formato; La Boheme Fine Art Gallery, Coral Gables, FL
<br>
<br>2000 · Una Constelación de Noches; Lopez Quiroga Gallery, Mexico DF *
<br>
<br>1999	· Talavera Contemporánea; San Francisco Cultural Center, Contemporary Art Gallery, Puebla, Mexico *
<br>· Millennium; La Boheme Fine Art Gallery, Coral Gables, FL
<br>· Pequeño Formato; La Boheme Fine Art Gallery, Coral Gables, FL
<br>· Mixta s/papel ’99; Lyle O. Reitzel Contemporary Art, Santo Domingo, DR 
<br>· Salón de Pequeño Formato; El Espacio Gallery, Mexico DF
<br>· Colección Gobierno del Estado de Puebla; Galeria de Arte Contemporaneo, Puebla, Mexico
<br>
<br>1998	· Group Show; Drexel Gallery, Monterrey, Mexico
<br>· Arte Erótico; Casa de los Muñecos, University Museum, Puebla, Mexico
<br>	
<br>1997	· Artistic Odyssey: Cuba-USA; Amalia Mahoney Gallery, Chicago, IL
<br>
<br>1996	· Premio MARCO, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico *
<br>	· Anatomía; Oscar Roman Gallery, Mexico DF
<br>· Artistas unidos contra el SIDA; Museo Universitario del Chopo, Mexico DF
<br>	· El Circo, Oscar Roman Gallery; Mexico DF
<br>· Concurso Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo de Pintura Joven en México. Competition of young painters sponsored by Interamerican Development Bank in Mexico; SHCP Cultural Center, Mexico DF; Art Gallery of Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico *
<br>
<br>1995	· Advento; Group Exhibition of Contemporary Art; Tecali, Puebla, Mexico
<br>· Formas de Expresión; 180º Gallery, Puebla, Mexico
<br>	· Group Exhibition; El Angel Gallery, Ciudad Mexico
<br>· Arte Contemporáneo; 180º Gallery, Puebla, Mexico
<br>
<br>1994	· One Group Show; Javier Lumbreras Fine Art, Coral Gables, FL
<br>· Ojos que no ven; In Spazio Gallery, Puebla, Mexico
<br>	· Aquí y Ahora; 180º Gallery, Puebla, Mexico
<br>
<br>1993	· Nacidos en Cuba; Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR *
<br>· One Group Show; Javier Lumbreras Fine Art; Coral Gables, FL
<br>	· Colectiva; La Troje de San Mateo Gallery, Atlixco, Puebla, Mexico
<br>
<br>1992	· I Bienal de Pintura del Caribe; Santo Domingo, DR
<br>· VIII Bienal Iberoamericana de Arte, América Nuestro Continente, Domeq Cultural Institute, Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico DF *
<br>· Pabellón Cubano de las Artes; World Show, Seville 1992, Spain
<br>· La década prodigiosa; Museo Universitario del Chopo, Mexico DF *
<br>
<br>1991	· IV Bienal de La Habana. El Desafío a la Conquista y Colonización; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana *
<br>· VIII Trienal de la India; Lalit Kala Academy, New Delhi, India
<br>· En sus marcos listos II; IV Bienal de la Havana, Havana Gallery, Havana
<br>·18 peintres de Cuba a Paris; Federation Du Val-d´Oise, Paris *
<br>· Salón de profesores; Luz y Oficio Gallery, Havana
<br>· En sus Marcos Listos; Havana Gallery, Havana 
<br>· Nacidos en Cuba; Universidad de Valencia, Centro de Arte de Caracas, Caracas, Venezuela; Museo de Arte de Toluca, Toluca, Mexico *
<br>
<br>1990	· Andar Pinar; Luz y Oficio Gallery, Havana
<br>· V Salón de Premiados; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana
<br>· Exposición Colectiva Itinerante de Serigrafía en Centros de Arte de África: School of Fine Arts, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Nommo Gallery, Kampala, Uganda; National Art Museum, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; National Art Museum, Harare, Zimbabwe; Ecole de Poto-Poto, Brazzaville, Congo 
<br>
<br>1989	· De lo Abstracto; Havana Gallery,  Havana 
<br>· Salón Nacional Asociación Hermanos Saínz; Casa del Joven Creador, Havana
<br>· Homenaje del Instituto Superior de Arte a la Casa de las Américas; Casa de las Americas, Havana
<br>· Jornada de la Cultura Cubana; Tres Mundos Gallery, Managua
<br>· III Bienal de la Habana; Instituto Superior de Arte Gallery, Havana
<br>· V Salón Provincial de Artes Plásticas; Pinar del Rio Gallery, Pinar del Rio, Cuba
<br>· IV Salón de Premiados; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana
<br>
<br>1988  ·Arte Cubano Joven; Art Institute of Massachusetts; Boston, Massachusetts
<br>· Festival de la Creación y la Investigación Artística; Instituto Superior de Arte Gallery, Havana
<br>· Jóvenes Artistas Plásticos; Abel Santamaria Museum, Santa Clara, Cuba
<br>· IV Salón Provincial de Artes Plásticas; Pinar del Rio Gallery,  Pinar del Rio, Cuba
<br>· Salón de la Ciudad; Luz y Oficio Gallery, Havana
<br>
<br>1987	· Veintitantos Abriles; Havana Gallery, Havana
<br>· Salón de la Ciudad; Servando Cabrera Moreno Gallery, Havana
<br>· III Salón Provincial de Artes Plásticas; Pinar del Rio Gallery, Pinar del Rio, Cuba
<br>
<br>1986	· Salón Interescolar; Escuela Nacional de Artes Plasticas and Academia de San Alejandro, Havana
<br>
<br>1985	· Salón Nacional de Escuelas de Arte; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana
<br>
<br>
<br>MUSEUM AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS
<br>
<br>New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA
<br>El Museo del Barrio, New York, NY
<br>Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, NY	
<br>Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, FL
<br>Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale, FL
<br>Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA
<br>The Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery, Lebanon Valley Collage, Annville PA
<br>Lowe Art Museum, Coral Gables, FL
<br>Museo Amparo, Mexico
<br>Museo Poblano de Arte Virreinal, Puebla, Mexico
<br>Museo Casa de los Muñecos, Puebla, Mexico
<br>Bank of Mexico Collection, Mexico
<br>Secretaria de Hacienda y Credito Publico Collection, Mexico DF
<br>Gobierno del Estado de Puebla Collection, Puebla, Mexico
<br>Casa de la Cultura de Puebla, Puebla, Mexico
<br>University of the Americas, Puebla, Mexico
<br>Talavera Uriarte Ceramics Collection, Puebla, Mexico
<br>Talavera de la Reina Ceramics Collection, Puebla, Mexico
<br>Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana
<br>Wifredo Lam Center, Havana
<br>The Ludwig Foundation, Germany
<br>The Jaime Wasch Foundation, Spain
<br>The Miterrand Foundation, France
<br>
<br> 
<br>SCULPTURE IN PUBLIC SPACES 
<br>
<br>Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, FL
<br>Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA
<br>
<br>
<br>A W A R D S
<br>
<br>2008 	· Artist in Residence; Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale, FL
<br>	· New American Paintings; Juried Exhibition-in-Print, Number 76 *
<br>2001	· Grant award; Pollock-Krasner Foundation, New York, NY *
<br>1998	· Fellowship; State Government of Puebla, Puebla, Mexico
<br>1997	· Fellowship; State Government of Puebla, Puebla, Mexico
<br>1991	· First Prize; Salon de Profesores, Luz y Oficio Gallery, Havana 
<br>1989   · First Prize; V Salón Provincial de Artes Plásticas; Pinar del Rio, Cuba
<br>	· “IV Salón Nacional de Premiados” Award; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana
<br>1988	· First Prize; Salon de la Ciudad, Luz y Oficio Gallery, Havana 
<br>· First Prize; IV Salón Provincial de Artes Plásticas, Pinar del Rio, Cuba
<br>1987	· Honorable Mention; Salón de la Ciudad, Servando Cabrera Moreno Gallery, Havana
<br>1986	· “Salón Interescolar” Award; Escuela Nacional de Artes Plasticas and Academia de San Alejandro, Havana 
<br>Special Award:
<br>In 2001, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service granted Carlos Luna an EB-1-1 (Alien of Extraordinary Ability) Immigrant Visa. Granted under very special circumstances to applicants who can prove outstanding artistic, scientific, athletic, community, or scholarly performance, the EB-1-1 Visa affords the recipient and his family permanent residence status in the U.S. 
<br>
<br>
<br>A U C T I O N S
<br>
<br>2009	· Sotheby's Latin American Art, [Lot 175] November 19, 2009, New York, NY
<br>	· Auction 09, Contemporary Latin American Art, [Lot 43], Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA
<br>
<br>2008	· Sotheby's Latin American Art, [Lot 250] November 19, 2008, New York, NY
<br>· Sotheby's Latin American Art, [Lot 277] May 30, 2008, New York, NY 
<br>	· Auction 08, Contemporary Latin American Art, [Lot 31], Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA
<br>· The Rare Event Auction, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables, FL 
<br>
<br>2007	· Sotheby's Latin American Art, [Lot 290] November 21, 2007, New York, NY 
<br>· The Rare Event Auction, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables, FL 
<br>· Auction Carnaval do Rio – Oba, The ASU Art Museum, Tempe, AZ
<br>
<br>2006	· Sotheby's Latin American Art, [Lot 185] May 25, 2006, New York, NY 
<br>· Auction 06, Contemporary Latin American Art, [Lot 8 & 151], Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA
<br>
<br>2005	· Auction 05, Contemporary Latin American Art, [Lot 22], Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA
<br>	· Internacional Kids Fund, Latin American Art Auction 2005, Miami Art Central, Miami FL
<br>
<br>* Exhibition accompanied by catalogue

CARLOS LUNA

IRVING NORMAN - The Circus, Balancing Act 2 (a Study) - pencil on paper - 11 x 9 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - The Circus, The Balancing Act 2a (a Study) - pencil on paper - 11 x 9 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "The Immortality of Beethoven's 9th Symphony") - pencil on paper - 14 x 11  in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Bodies in Crypt) - pencil on paper - 7 1/2 x 3 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (War Study) - graphite on paper - 6 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Bodies) - pencil on paper - 6 3/4 x 2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Smoking Man) - pen on paper - 8 7/8 x 6 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Man with Fire Bird) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "Celebration") - graphite on paper - 4 7/8 x 3 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - pencil on paper - 11 x 14 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Head with Fire) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - pencil on paper - 11 x 14 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Abstract Heads) - pen on paper - 8 7/8 x 6 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "The Immortality of Beethoven's 9th Symphony" 2) - graphite on paper - 14 x 11 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Four Heads) - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

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