Our gallery in Palm Desert is centrally located in the Palm Springs area of California, adjacent to the popular shopping and dining area of El Paseo. Our clientele appreciates our selection of Post War, Modern, and Contemporary art. The gorgeous weather during the winter months draws visitors from all over the world to see our beautiful desert, and stop by our gallery. The mountainous desert landscape outside provides the perfect scenic backdrop to the visual feast that awaits inside.

45188 Portola Avenue
Palm Desert, CA 92260
(760) 346-8926

Hours:
Currently open by appointment only

Exhibitions

Pop Figures: Mel Ramos and Tom Wesselmann
CURRENT

Pop Figures: Mel Ramos and Tom Wesselmann

March 26 - September 30, 2020
Norman Zammitt: The Progression of Color
CURRENT

Norman Zammitt: The Progression of Color

March 19 - June 30, 2020
The Gloria Luria Collection
CURRENT

The Gloria Luria Collection

March 16 - August 31, 2020
Jae Kon Park: Life and Root
CURRENT

Jae Kon Park: Life and Root

March 12 - May 31, 2020
Jewels of Impressionism and Modern Art
CURRENT

Jewels of Impressionism and Modern Art

February 19 - April 30, 2020
Hassel Smith: The Measured Paintings
CURRENT

Hassel Smith: The Measured Paintings

February 12 - April 20, 2020
Paul Jenkins: Coloring the Phenomenal
CURRENT

Paul Jenkins: Coloring the Phenomenal

December 27, 2019 - April 30, 2020
Irving Norman: Dark Matter
CURRENT

Irving Norman: Dark Matter

November 27, 2019 - May 31, 2020
Mesa Modern
ARCHIVE

Mesa Modern

February 13 - February 29, 2020
The Californians
ARCHIVE

The Californians

November 1, 2019 - February 14, 2020
Opulent Minimalism
ARCHIVE

Opulent Minimalism

December 3, 2019 - January 31, 2020
Paul Jenkins and Robert Natkin
ARCHIVE

Paul Jenkins and Robert Natkin

November 1 - December 27, 2019
Morris Louis - The Early Paintings
ARCHIVE

Morris Louis - The Early Paintings

October 11 - November 30, 2019
Anselm Kiefer
ARCHIVE

Anselm Kiefer

August 15 - September 30, 2019
Paul Jenkins: Phenomenal
ARCHIVE

Paul Jenkins: Phenomenal

July 1 - August 31, 2019
Peter Shelton: A Thing You Bump Into
ARCHIVE

Peter Shelton: A Thing You Bump Into

July 16 - August 31, 2019
Mel Ramos and Tom Wesselmann
ARCHIVE

Mel Ramos and Tom Wesselmann

July 12 - August 31, 2019
Alexander Calder: Cosmic Abstraction
ARCHIVE

Alexander Calder: Cosmic Abstraction

June 21 - August 30, 2019
Julian Schnabel
ARCHIVE

Julian Schnabel

June 4 - July 31, 2019
Hassel Smith
ARCHIVE

Hassel Smith

May 6 - June 30, 2019
Luc Bernard: Unconventional Borders
ARCHIVE

Luc Bernard: Unconventional Borders

May 3 - May 31, 2019
Sam Francis: From Dusk to Dawn
ARCHIVE

Sam Francis: From Dusk to Dawn

November 15, 2018 - April 29, 2019
Architectural Landscapes
ARCHIVE

Architectural Landscapes

December 1, 2018 - January 31, 2019
Herb Alpert: A Visual Melody
ARCHIVE

Herb Alpert: A Visual Melody

February 17 - May 31, 2018
N.C. Wyeth: Paintings and Illustrations
ARCHIVE

N.C. Wyeth: Paintings and Illustrations

February 1 - May 31, 2018
Sublime Abstraction
ARCHIVE

Sublime Abstraction

November 25, 2017 - May 31, 2018
Gregory Sumida: Americana
ARCHIVE

Gregory Sumida: Americana

April 5 - May 31, 2018
The Paintings of Sir Winston Churchill
ARCHIVE

The Paintings of Sir Winston Churchill

March 21 - May 30, 2018
Wojciech Fangor
ARCHIVE

Wojciech Fangor

November 25, 2017 - March 17, 2018
Edward S. Curtis
ARCHIVE

Edward S. Curtis

February 3 - March 17, 2018
Ferrari and Futurists: An Italian Look at Speed
ARCHIVE

Ferrari and Futurists: An Italian Look at Speed

November 21, 2016 - January 30, 2017
Alexander Calder
ARCHIVE

Alexander Calder

November 21, 2015 - May 28, 2016
Max Pellegrini: A Retrospective Exhibition
ARCHIVE

Max Pellegrini: A Retrospective Exhibition

November 27, 2015 - March 27, 2016
Masters of California Impressionism
ARCHIVE

Masters of California Impressionism

November 22, 2014 - May 23, 2015
Lawrence Schiller: Marilyn Monroe and Great Moments from the 60s
ARCHIVE

Lawrence Schiller: Marilyn Monroe and Great Moments from the 60s

November 23, 2012 - January 31, 2013
Painterly Abstraction: Spheres of AbEx
ARCHIVE

Painterly Abstraction: Spheres of AbEx

November 25, 2011 - May 31, 2012
Washi Tales: Works by Kyoko Ibe
ARCHIVE

Washi Tales: Works by Kyoko Ibe

December 11, 2011 - January 28, 2012
Masters of Impressionism and Modern Art
ARCHIVE

Masters of Impressionism and Modern Art

November 20, 2010 - September 25, 2011
Picasso
ARCHIVE

Picasso

November 20, 2009 - May 25, 2010

ARTWORK ON VIEW

ALFRED SISLEY - Apres-midi d'aout a Veneux - oil on canvas - 21 1/4 x 28 3/4 in.

ALFRED SISLEY

Gustave Caillebotte’s paintings of his country home at Yerres display soft brushwork and a pastel palette typical of the Impressionists. Although closely associated with that movement, Caillebotte drew inspiration from other approaches as well, resulting in a style closer to Realism than many of his contemporaries. He aimed to paint the world as he observed it, producing works that resisted theatricality in favor of a more grounded sense of reality. His noteworthy urban scenes employ flatter colors and dramatic perspectives inspired by Japanese wood block prints. One such example, created in the same year as the present work, is one of his best-known paintings, Paris Street; Rainy Day at the Art Institute of Chicago.
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<br>Caillebotte did not only contribute his painting to the Impressionist movement, but also became a crucial benefactor upon receiving a sizable inheritance. He helped to fund exhibitions, purchased works for his own collection, and even paid rent for Claude Monet’s studio. 
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<br>This canvas from 1877 belonged to the personal collection of American Impressionist Mary Cassatt until her death in 1926. Here, Caillebotte’s delicate paint handling compliments his measured use of color. Naturalistic hues of the artist’s garden and the valley beyond – a bed of cool green and blue that divide the canvas into contrasting swaths of heavy and light tones – underscore the details touched by light.

GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE

Created at a seminal point early in the artist’s career, Le Mont Riboudet à Rouen au Printemps by Claude Monet, depicts a beautiful landscape with flora, figures working in the fields, and haystacks. The aesthetic is comparable to that of Camille Pisarro and Alfred Sisley, Monet’s contemporaries also working en plein air at the time to capture nuances of the French countryside on canvas. The painting’s distinguished provenance includes Durand-Ruel and Gustave Caillebotte.

CLAUDE MONET

Beginning in 1873, Winslow Homer created intimate watercolors inspired by the people and places he encountered. "In the Garden" (1874) conveys the sense of mystery and ambiguity present in Homer's scenes of the American Civil War and its aftermath. One cannot help but notice the feeling of melancholy in the figure, perhaps holding onto a garment of her lover-lost during the war. 
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<br>"You will see, in the future, I will live by my watercolors," Winslow Homer said.  The legacy of the watercolors Homer produced is among the artist's most significant contributions to American Art. Homer was deeply admired by many 20th-century artists such as Edward Hopper, Andrew Wyeth, and John Marin, who were all influenced by Homer's nuanced and often introspective watercolors.   
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<br>The present work was included in the Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition, "200 Years of Watercolor Painting in America," December 1966 - January 1967 and the 1973 Whitney Museum of American Art exhibition, "Winslow Homer."

WINSLOW HOMER

Blood Cinema is an elegant and interactive masterwork of steel and acrylic by Anish Kapoor. The artist’s most notable works are grand-scale public installations that explore perception, captivating and challenging viewers worldwide with iconic public installations such as Chicago’s Cloud Gate (2006) and in his well-known glass and mirror pieces. Resting on the floor like an oversized lens, Blood Cinema warps the viewer’s perspective and distorts its environment through ethereal shades of red, epitomizing Kapoor's capacity for viewer immersion.

ANISH KAPOOR

Tom Wesselmann’s supercharged colors mirror popular advertising while the lounging female forms allude to Western art history’s classic figurative motif. A wonderful example of this synthesis is the 1997 painting 1962 Plus 35 Nude Sketch II. Here, the reclining woman’s eyes are barely visible beneath the surface of the paint, yet her lips are a bold red with a thick black outline. The hyper-sexualized presentation of the female body seems to address the consumer culture of Post War America – the commoditization of the flesh. Wesselmann’s dazzling paintings bring together elements of art historical tradition and 1960s imagination, creating a singular style.

TOM WESSELMANN

Shortly after his major retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1941, Salvador Dalí parlayed the idea of accumulated, or “flowering,” eyes into a grand oil and tempera painting for the set of his 1944 ballet Mad Tristan. In this painting from the same year, Les Yeux Fleuris, Dalí depicts three rows of four eyes with long lashes and a tear dropping on a brick wall backdrop. Eyes appear in Dalí paintings, sculpture, and jewelry throughout his career — as late as the 1981 painting Argus and, most notably, in paintings Dalí made for the dream sequences of the film Spellbound directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

SALVADOR DALI

"San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
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<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
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<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
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<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation.

ANSELM KIEFER

American painter John Marin set up his studio in Paris where he drew upon ideas from both the Post-Impressionists and the budding Modernism of the early 20th century. Championed and supported by renowned gallerist Alfred Stieglitz and photographer Edward Steichen, Marin returned to the United States, bringing with him the avant-garde European style of painting that he rooted in the natural landscape. Marin made annual trips to Maine, inspired by its coast and landscape. In Cape Split, Maine, Marin captures the stark ruggedness of the seacoast.

JOHN MARIN

Irving Norman's masterpiece, "The Human Condition," from 1980, draws upon the artist's lifetime of acquired experiences and knowledge. Surviving as a volunteer fighter during the Spanish Civil War, the artist returned to the United States after the loyalist defeat. Upon his return, fervent studio practice in Half Moon Bay, California, would become his life's devotion.  
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<br>The present work, a nearly 16-foot-wide triptych, is reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch's triptych, "The Garden of Earthly Delights," c. 1510.  The dystopian vision portrayed in 'The Human Condition" is a warning - a lesson from the European dictatorships Norman experienced firsthand during the 1930s.   Disturbing tableaus show the darkness of humanity and the evil that can rise to prominence when humanity is at its worst.  There is hope, however, in the experience of the viewer: Norman thought of his audience as the greatest hope for humankind.

IRVING NORMAN

This painting portrays Renoir’s favorite and final model, Andrée Heuschling. She would go one to marry the artist’s son. Heuschling recurs in many of Renoir portraits, including “Andrée en chapeau, lisant,” from the same year and now at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia.
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<br>One of the leaders of the Impressionists, Renoir is best known for his portraits showcasing modern, metropolitan life. The painting exemplifies Renoir’s fondness for a brighter color palette, lending warmth and texture to his artworks.

PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR

Larry Rivers is considered by many to be the "Godfather" of the Pop-Art movement.  In Larry Rivers' 1980 work "Beyond Camel," we see a slightly out of focus Camel Cigarette pack, an item from consumer culture Rivers has appropriated to create a critique of commoditization and consumer culture.  Rivers would have certainly been aware of the work of Stuart Davis and his 1921 painting, "Lucky Strike," depicting a flattened pack of cigarettes.  Rivers interprets his subject with a pop-art perspective; however, the imagery is almost larger than life, and the brand image is presented as a subject unto itself.  
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<br>In 2002 a retrospective of Rivers' work was held at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

LARRY RIVERS

Carl Andre’s floor sculptures are typically made from glowing tiles of lead, zinc, or copper. They differ from most other minimalist artwork in their accessibility: they are meant to be walked on. Art historically, Andre places himself in the lineage of Constantin Brancusi and Henry Moore. Andre continues in their tradition of reducing the vocabulary of sculpture to its most vital and simple forms. The works also speak to Donald Judd’s idea of “specific objects,” which emphasized the phenomenological experience of the viewer and an exploration of structure and space.

CARL ANDRE

Gabriel Orozco is one of the preeminent artists working today. A native Mexican, Orozco gained initial recognition in the 1990s through his artistic creations across a wide range of media, including sculpture, drawing, photography, and installation works. Orozco had a significant mid-career traveling retrospective that ended in 2011 at the Tate Modern. He is widely regarded as one of the most innovative artists of our time.
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<br>“Samurai Tree - Invariant Gold 2” (2005) is part of the “Samurai Tree” series, the genesis of which was an exploration into the geometry of the circle in drawings Orozco produced on graph paper before 2004.  
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<br>“I thought that by establishing some rules, I could build up a structure that behaves like a sculpture,” says the artist, “so it’s a flat mobile maybe, or it’s a diagram that’s rotating and moving. And behaving not like a painting, in a way.”

GABRIEL OROZCO

“Les Gardeuses de Vaches,” 1883 is a gem-like pastel by the Impressionist master, Camille Pissarro. Impressionism at its core represents a democratization of art without lofty academic ideals or royal patronage. The present pastel shows the heroism of the peasant, elevating the daily activities of the peasantry are elevated to a position of importance. Pissarro, along with his contemporaries Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir among others, challenged the ideas of what was acceptable in painting, in essence, creating an artistic revolution.  
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<br>“Les Gardeuses de Vaches” has an illustrious provenance, having been included in several exhibitions from 1893 onward at Galerie Durand-Ruel, Paris.

CAMILLE PISSARRO

A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
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<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”

DAMIEN HIRST

"Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
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<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

LARRY RIVERS

American painter Pat Steir has sought inspiration in both Abstract Expressionism and Taoist philosophy. Ancient Chinese painting techniques, most significantly the eighth and ninth century “ink-splashing” painters, helped to inform her Waterfall series, which gained her acclaim and recognition in the 1980s. These works, created by splashing and dripping her pigments onto the canvas, were inspired by the relationship between humanity and nature, and the concept of allowing elemental forces to actively assist in creating her paintings. She begins the process, and then lets gravity and the environment take over, the results no longer in her hands.  
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<br>Also appearing repeatedly in her work is floral imagery. This large-scale triptych from 1981 is one of her earliest Chrysanthemum paintings. It was exhibited in the Whitney Biennial in 1982.

PAT STEIR

Deborah Butterfield is an American sculptor, best known for her sculptures of horses made of objects ranging from wood, metal, and other found objects. The 1981 piece, Untitled (Horse), is comprised of sticks and paper on wire armature. The impressive scale of this piece creates a remarkable effect in person, presenting a striking example of Butterfield's celebrated subject matter. Butterfield originally created the horses from wood and other materials found on her property in Bozeman, Montana and saw the horses as a metaphorical self-portrait, mining the emotional resonance of these forms.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD

Jean Arp is one of the most important sculptors of the 20th century for his ability to create abstract yet organic sculptures in a variety of media. He was a founder of Dada and participated in the surrealist movement. Rather than starting with a subject, Arp utilized form and chance to produce art.
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<br>“Evocation d'une Forme Humaine Lunaire Spectrale” is a stellar example of Arp’s abstract biomorphic sculpture. It presents a smooth and graceful form that melds the human figure with an ethereal lunar landscape. Arp experimented with this form in diverse media and other iterations can be found in the collection of the Smithsonian's Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (in bronze), Museo d'Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro (in pink limestone), and the Dotremont Collection in Brussels (in white marble).

JEAN ARP

KENNY SCHARF - Kolorbz - oil and acrylic on canvas - 114 x 90 in.

KENNY SCHARF

ANSELM KIEFER - Jericho - emulsion, acrylic, sand, clay and photographic paper on cardboard - 25 x 17 1/2 x 2.25 in.

ANSELM KIEFER

Henri Matisse is one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century and whose oeuvre covers painting, drawing, sculpture, etchings, linocuts, lithographs, aquatints, paper cutouts, and book illustration. An early proponent of Fauvism with its outrageous colors and dynamic composition, Matisse would also move into abstraction, pioneering the use of color and form in each stage of his career. This drawing depicts Madame Monchaux and displays the incredible draftsmanship that often characterized his work. Striving to achieve “the art of balance, of purity and serenity”, his drawings appear effortless but are careful studies to unite line and form.

HENRI MATISSE

Paul Jenkins is renowned for his technique of controlled paint pouring and use of translucent colors. His paintings drew upon a wide range of philosophies from Gurdjieff to Goethe, Jung to Zen Buddhism, astrology to alchemy. Jenkins remarked of his painting process, “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it.” A combination of chance and control (Jenkins used a dull ivory knife to guide the paint) reveals paintings of dazzling depth and beauty with their sinuous seams and arcs of phenomenal colors.
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<br>Jenkins primed his canvas so that unlike those of other Color Field artists, the paint did not soak in and instead, flowed and pooled – perhaps best exemplified in this large-scale painting with gem-like colors. Whether oil, acrylic, or watercolor, Jenkins displayed a mastery over these media so that both the process and the product are united.

PAUL JENKINS

IRVING NORMAN - To Have and Have Not, Charity Gala - oil on canvas - 92 x 104 in.

IRVING NORMAN

HERB ALPERT - Arrowhead - bronze - 201 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Freedom - bronze - 201 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Hope - bronze - 212 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

IRVING NORMAN - The Academy - oil on canvas - 110 x 90 in.

IRVING NORMAN

ANTHONY CARO - Figure in a Tub - bronze - 42 x 30 1/4 x 24 1/4 in.

ANTHONY CARO

IRVING NORMAN - M.F.I. Complex - oil on canvas - 100 x 76 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - To the Unknown - oil on canvas - 96 x 72 in.

IRVING NORMAN

HERB ALPERT - Illumination - bronze - 159 x 40 x 40 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Radiance - bronze - 161 x 40 x 40 in.

HERB ALPERT

N.C. WYETH - Bringing in the Ears (Composition drawing) - charcoal on paper - 26 1/2 x 32 in.

N.C. WYETH

Afternoon Tea on the Terrace (1905-1906) was commissioned by Rodman Wanamaker as part of a mural for the Grand Deluxe Shelburn hotel in Atlantic City. The mural was later divided into seven pieces that were displayed in the hotel dining room. Frieseke’s earliest mural work was for his patron, Rodman Wanamaker. Other commissions included mural decorations that were installed in Wanamaer’s New York department store in 1904 and 1907, the Rodman Wanamaker Hotel in 1905, and the Amphitheater of Music in New York in 1908. Art historians credit Wanamaker’s constant commissions as being the sole reason Frieseke was able to devote himself to painting.

FREDERICK CARL FRIESEKE

IRVING NORMAN - Draftee - oil on canvas - 100 x 38 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Flight - oil on canvas - 60 x 74 in.

IRVING NORMAN

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ - Moonbow - acrylic on canvas - 48 x 48 in.

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ

IRVING NORMAN - Totem of a Holy Family - oil on canvas - 90 x 19 3/4 in.

IRVING NORMAN

OSWALDO GUAYASAMIN - Atahualpa en Cajamarcas - oil on canvas - 28 x 19 1/2 in. .

OSWALDO GUAYASAMIN

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS - Embrace - stainless steel - 51 x 31 3/4 x 18 3/4 in.

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS - Sempre Allegro - stainles steel - 101 1/4 x 35 1/2 x 37 in..

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS - Joy of Being II - stainless steel - 72 x 21 1/2 x 14 in.

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS

KARL BENJAMIN - #32 - oil on canvas - 31 x 62 in.

KARL BENJAMIN

NATHAN OLIVEIRA - Standing Figure #2 - bronze - 26 x 16 x 23 1/2 in.

NATHAN OLIVEIRA

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 52 1/4 x 64 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

THEASTER GATES - Untitled (flooring) - white cement, debris, flooring - 35 x 35 x 3 in.

THEASTER GATES

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 38 x 51 in.

JAE KON PARK

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Horse with Swimmers at Beach - acrylic on canvas - 36  x 48 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

NORMAN ZAMMITT - Panel for Black to White - acrylic on canvas on pine board - 100 x 11 1/4 in.

NORMAN ZAMMITT

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 34 x 43 1/4 in..

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 36 x 45 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 35 1/4 x 46 in.

JAE KON PARK

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Painting with Jumping Man and Snake) - acrylic on canvas - 38 x 42 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 35 1/2 x 45 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 36 x 46 in.

JAE KON PARK

PAUL JENKINS - Phenomena Lucifer Edge - oil on canvas - 45 x 34 3/4 in

PAUL JENKINS

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Landscape with Rocks - acrylic on canvas - 48 x 48 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on burlap - 39 1/2 x 35 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 35 x 33 7/8 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 28 1/2 x 35 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

DIETZ EDZARD - Jeune Homme Reveur (Self Portrait) - oil on canvas - 45 x 25 3/4

DIETZ EDZARD

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 31 3/4 x 27 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JEFF KOONS - Balloon Dog (Red) - porcelain - 10 1/2 x 10 1/2 in.

JEFF KOONS

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - resin and acrylic - 23 3/4 x 23 3/4 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 24 x 28 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 24 x 28 3/4  in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Life and Roots - oil on canvas - 25 1/2 x 20 5/8 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Life and Roots - oil on canvas - 28 x 20 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

PAUL JENKINS - Phenomena D.H. Lawrence Gala - watercolor on paper - 43 1/8 x 31 1/4 in.

PAUL JENKINS

PAUL JENKINS - Untitled - watercolor and ink on paper - 29 3/4 x 42 3/4 in.

PAUL JENKINS

PAUL JENKINS - Untitled - watercolor on paper - 43 1/8 x 31 1/8 in. .

PAUL JENKINS

PAUL JENKINS - Untitled - watercolor on paper - 41 3/4 x 30 in.

PAUL JENKINS

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Nudes with Tree) (Woman and Child) - acrylic on canvas - 11 x 14 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

PAUL WONNER - Steps in Lafayette Park - acrylic and pencil on paper - 15 x 22 1/4 in.

PAUL WONNER

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on painting - 18 x 21 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 18 x 21 in.

JAE KON PARK

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Three Nudes One Seated) - acrylic on paper - 11 1/8 x 14 1/4 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Jamie Seated (Green Background) - acrylic and oil on canvas - 14 x 9 3/4 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Soldiers) - acrylic on canvas - 14 x 18 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Seated Figure) - charcoal and gouache on paper - 18 3/4 x 14 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

PAUL WONNER - Youth and Old Age - acrylic on paper - 14 1/2 x 16 5/8 in.

PAUL WONNER

PAUL WONNER - Artist and Model, Hands on Hips - acrylic and pencil on paper - 14 1/4 x 16 1/4 in.

PAUL WONNER

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Landscape with Rocks) - oil on board - 11 x 14 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (2 Male Nudes) - acrylic on paper - 14 x 9 3/4 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Bathers) - acrylic on paper - 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Jamie - acrylic on paper - 13 7/8 x 9 7/8 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

PAUL WONNER - Youth and Old Age, Artist and Model - acrylic and pencil on paper - 13 1/4 x 15 in.

PAUL WONNER

PAUL WONNER - Park with Figures - acrylic and pencil on paper - 15 x 22 in.

PAUL WONNER

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Jamie - acrylic on paper - 14 x 10 3/4 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

UTAGAWA HIROSHIGE - Okabe: Utsu Mountain - color woodblock print; oban
Color woodblock print; oban - 9 1/2 x 14 3/16 in.

UTAGAWA HIROSHIGE

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Up - acrylic on paper - 16 1/2 x 11 1/2 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

PAUL WONNER - Youth and Old Age: Artist, Model, Pots of Flowers - acrylic and pencil on paper - 14 1/4 x 12 1/4 in.

PAUL WONNER

PAUL WONNER - Landscape with Bathers - acrylic and pencil on paper - 14 7/8 x 22 1/8 in.

PAUL WONNER

PAUL WONNER - Landscape with Bathers After Cezanne - acrylic and pencil on paper - 14 7/8 x 22 1/2 in.

PAUL WONNER

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Two Nudes) (Two Figures) - acrylic and charcoal on paper - 11 x 15 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Seated Female Nude) - charcoal, pencil and wash on paper - 25 1/2 x 19 1/2 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

LAWRENCE SCHILLER - Oswald's Gun, Dallas Polic Station, Dallas Texas, November 23, 1963 - silver gelatin print - 16 x 20 in.

LAWRENCE SCHILLER

JAE KON PARK - About Ancient Korea - batik on fabric - 11 3/4 x 12 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled Drawing (Nude on Floor) - acrylic and charcoal on paper - 11 x 15 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

PAUL WONNER - Artist Drawing The Model - acrylic and pencil on paper - 12 x 10 1/4 in.

PAUL WONNER

PAUL WONNER - Trees and Rock on the Bay - acrylic and pencil on paper - 15 x 22 in.

PAUL WONNER

PAUL WONNER - In Lafayette Park VI - acrylic and pencil on paper - 13 5/8 x 20 5/8 in.

PAUL WONNER

JAE KON PARK - About Patterns - batik on fabric - 9 1/4 x 11 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Birds of Spring - batik on fabric - 10 3/4 x 12 1/4 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Twice-drawn Bird - batik on fabric - 10 1/2 x 12 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Life - batik on fabric - 9 1/2 x 10 3/4 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Twice-drawn Bird - batik on fabric - 10 1/2 x 12 in.

JAE KON PARK

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Split Rock, Cisco Grove - acrylic on canvas - 11 x 14 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

PAUL WONNER - At Mission Rock - acrylic and pencil on paper - 14 1/2 x 16 in.

PAUL WONNER

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled (Nude Male on Floor) - acrylic on paper - 11 3/4 x 9 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled Drawing - pencil and wash on paper - 15 x 11 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

JAE KON PARK - The Mystery Series - ink on paper - 13 3/4 x 12 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - America Series - ink on paper - 13 3/4 x 12 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - Mystery of the Artic - ink on paper - 14 x 12 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled Drawing (Nude on Block) - pencil and wash on paper - 15 x 10 3/4 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - ink on paper - 10 3/4 x 9 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - The Incan Sun - ink on paper - 10 1/2 x 9 1/2 in.

JAE KON PARK

JAE KON PARK - The Incan Sun - ink on paper - 10 3/4 x 9 1/4 in.

JAE KON PARK

TSENG KWONG CHI - George Condo - c print - 16 x 20 in.

TSENG KWONG CHI

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled Drawing (Nude on Step) - pencil and wash on paper - 14 1/2 x 11 1/2 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Untitled Drawing (Standing Nude, Arm on Head) - pencil and wash on paper - 15 x 11 1/4 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

EDWARD STEICHEN - Colette - silver gelatin print - 13 x 10 1/4 in.

EDWARD STEICHEN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Self Portrait with Sketchbook - gouache - 8 1/2 x 6 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Two Cranes Take Flight (Into the Sunset) - gouache on paper - 11 x 14 1/2 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

DAVID MACH - Matchead - matchstick - 5 1/2 x 2 3/4 x 3 3/4 in.

DAVID MACH

DAVID MACH - (small white and lavender) - matchstick - 5 1/2 x 2 1/2 x 2 3/4 in.

DAVID MACH

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN - Self Portrait - gouache - 7 1/4 x 6 in.

WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN

IRVING NORMAN - The Circus, Balancing Act 2 (a Study) - pencil on paper - 11 x 9 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - The Circus, The Balancing Act 2a (a Study) - pencil on paper - 11 x 9 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "The Immortality of Beethoven's 9th Symphony") - pencil on paper - 14 x 11  in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - From Work - lithograph on paper - 20 x 25 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Bodies in Crypt) - pencil on paper - 7 1/2 x 3 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (War Study) - graphite on paper - 6 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Fire Bird) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Bodies) - pencil on paper - 6 3/4 x 2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Smoking Man) - pen on paper - 8 7/8 x 6 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Man with Fire Bird) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Couple) - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "Celebration") - graphite on paper - 4 7/8 x 3 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - pencil on paper - 11 x 14 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Head with Fire) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - pencil on paper - 11 x 14 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Abstract Heads) - pen on paper - 8 7/8 x 6 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "The Immortality of Beethoven's 9th Symphony" 2) - graphite on paper - 14 x 11 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Four Heads) - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

PAUL JENKINS - Phenomena Coriolis Wedge - oil on canvas - 66 x 77 in.

PAUL JENKINS

PAUL JENKINS - Phenomena Zodiac Violet - watercolor on paper - 40 x 29 in.

PAUL JENKINS

PAUL JENKINS - Phenomena Yoshihara Sound - watercolor on paper - 30 x 40 1/2 in.

PAUL JENKINS

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