Situated in the wild beauty of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, with National Parks as a stunning backdrop, Heather James Jackson has brought the highest caliber of artworks and services to the Intermountain West for almost a decade.

Catering to the unique community that makes Jackson Hole an unparalleled destination for American culture and the outdoors, Heather James strives to provide an unmatched selection of artworks and white glove services for locals and visitors alike.

172 Center Street, Suite 101
P.O. Box 3580
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
(307) 200-6090

Hours:
Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Andy Warhol
CURRENT

Andy Warhol

July 16 - August 31, 2019
Edward Hopper
CURRENT

Edward Hopper

July 1 - September 30, 2019
Sam Francis: On View in Jackson Hole
CURRENT

Sam Francis: On View in Jackson Hole

July 1 - October 15, 2019
Elaine de Kooning
ARCHIVE

Elaine de Kooning

July 1 - August 4, 2018
This oil painting by the preeminent and wildly eccentric artist amplifies a common theme not only in the artist’s work, but also in Surrealism as a movement. Dalí often depicted eyes in his paintings, sculpture, and fashion (especially jewelry) as both a symbol for the act of perception and as an allusion, and to promote a new way of seeing. It also imparts a sense of all-knowing power, which fed his “obsessive desire to become a clairvoyant in order to explore the unconscious,” a 2008 Sotheby’s catalog suggests. 
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<br>In 1942, a few months after his retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Dalí parlayed the idea of accumulated, or “flowering,” eyes into a grand oil and tempera painting for the set of his 1944 ballet Mad Tristan. In this painting, Les Yeux Fleuris, from the same year, Dalí depicts three rows of four eyes with long lashes and a tear dropping on a brick wall backdrop. Its provenance traces to Marques Jorge de Cuevas, who also owned a similar work by Dalí — the 15-foot-wide Yeux Fleuris, a 1931 tempera and oil on canvas that was used on the set for Mad Tristan. 
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<br>Eyes appear in Dalí paintings throughout his career — as late as the 1981 painting Argus, which has five eyes. Most notably, the eye appears in paintings Dalí made for the dream sequences of the film Spellbound starring Ingrid Bergman and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. By this time, a motor disorder forced Dalí into retirement, unable to hold and move a paintbrush. After his wife, Gala, died in 1982, Dalí moved into a castle in Pubol, where he was severely burned in a fire. About eight years later, he died of heart failure in the city where he was born, Figueres, Spain.

SALVADOR DALI

MARC CHAGALL - The Angel and the Tree of Life - tempera, gouache, black pencil and pen and ink on paper - matted image: 46 3/4 x 29 in.

MARC CHAGALL

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD - Yellow River - steel - 26 x 96 x 56 in.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD

EDWARD HOPPER - Church and Landscape - oil on canvas - 10 x 14 in.

EDWARD HOPPER

GUENTHER UECKER - Poesie der Destruktion - mixed media on canvas - 24 x 24 x 5 1/2 in.

GUENTHER UECKER

SAM FRANCIS - Untitled 1985, San Leandro - acrylic on canvas mounted on board - 44 x 52 in.

SAM FRANCIS

JANNIS KOUNELLIS - Untitled - iron, canvas and enamel - 78 3/4 x 70 7/8 x 4 3/4 in.

JANNIS KOUNELLIS

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG - Berm (Hoarfrost) - solvent transfer on fabric with cardboard - 62 1/2 x 35 1/2 in.

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

SAM FRANCIS - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 30 x 30 in.

SAM FRANCIS

THEASTER GATES - Convex Concave - brick and wood - 34 1/2 x 35 31/2 x 3 1/8 in.

THEASTER GATES

HENRI MATISSE - Nu couché accoudé - brush and India ink on paper - 15 3/4 x 20 1/2 in.

HENRI MATISSE

CHUCK CLOSE - Self-Portrait, 2000 - screenprint on paper - 58 1/3 x 48 in.

CHUCK CLOSE

WILLIAM MORRIS - Fallow Deer Situla - blown glass - 16 x 23 1/2 x 13 in.

WILLIAM MORRIS

HANS HOFMANN - Purple Tree - casein on board - 20 x 24 in.

HANS HOFMANN

THEASTER GATES - Lathe Black Box - wood, glass and lathe - 50 1/4 x 53 x 6 7/8 in.

THEASTER GATES

PETER HALLEY - Collocation - acrylic, metallic acrylic, pearlescent acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas - 72 1/4 x 72 x 3 3/4 in.

PETER HALLEY

TIM HAWKINSON - Forest Ear - wood and mixed media - 72 x 48 x 1 3/4 in.

TIM HAWKINSON

GEORGE CONDO - Girl With Bow Tie - oil on canvas - 39 1/4 x 28 3/4 in

GEORGE CONDO

HERB ALPERT - Embrace - bronze with gold patina - 83 x 27 x 27 in.

HERB ALPERT

MARY ABBOTT - Presence - oil on canvas - 46 x 87 in.

MARY ABBOTT

ANDY WARHOL - Mobil - screenprint on Lenox Museum Board - 38 x 37 3/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

HASSEL SMITH - King Clone - acrylic on canvas - 67 3/4 x 67 1/2 in.

HASSEL SMITH

HERB ALPERT - Tsunami - acrylic on canvas - 72 x 120 in.

HERB ALPERT

DAMIEN HIRST - Pharmaceuticals - inkjet in colors - 41 x 33 in.

DAMIEN HIRST

ANDY WARHOL - Hot Dog Bean - screenprint in colors on paper - 35 x 23 in.

ANDY WARHOL

THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in.

THEASTER GATES

GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in.

GUILLERMO KUITCA

Warhol began depicting the "Hammer and Sickle" in 1976 after seeing the symbol from the Soviet flag used in graffiti while visiting Italy. The icon represents the union of industrial and farm workers’ interests. To Warhol, the symbol was more Pop than politics. One of his assistants scoured books for reproductions and ultimately purchased a double-headed hammer and a sickle and arranged them in different positions to photograph. Warhol used the images for his series of silkscreens, which New York’s Castelli Gallery exhibited in 1977. His almost expressionist use of the hammer and sickle diffuses some of the Cold War tension that prevailed from the early 1940s through the 1980s.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Vote McGovern - screenprint - 42 x 42 in.

ANDY WARHOL

PABLO PICASSO - Le Danseur - linocut in colors - image:  25 x 20 3/4 in. sheet:  29 1/2 x 24 3/8 in.

PABLO PICASSO

HANS HOFMANN - Yellow Vase - oil on panel - 8 x 7 1/2 in.

HANS HOFMANN

DAMIEN HIRST - The Souls on Jacob's Ladder Take Their Flight - color photogravure etching - 47 1/2 x 43 1/4 in.

DAMIEN HIRST

JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in.

JEFF KOONS

HERB ALPERT - El Toro Solitario (The Lonely Bull) - bronze - 17 x 33 1/2 x 14 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Eagle Falls - bronze - 41 1/2 x 10 x 10 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Magic Man - bronze - 43 x 8 x 8 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - First Impression - bronze - 37 3/4 x 8 x 8 in.

HERB ALPERT

SALVADOR DALI - Le Femme au Coussin - etching - 15 3/4 x 12 1/2 in.

SALVADOR DALI

SALVADOR DALI - Les Femmes-Fleurs au Piano - etching - 15 3/4 x 12 1/2 in.

SALVADOR DALI

ANDY WARHOL - Martin Buber (from Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth
Century) - screenprint - 40 x 32 in.

ANDY WARHOL

PAUL JENKINS - Phenomena Turtle Keep - watercolor on paper - 41 1/2 x 30 in.

PAUL JENKINS

ANDY WARHOL - Cow (IIA Blue Background) - screenprint on wallpaper - 45 1/2 x 29 3/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

LUC BERNARD - Edges no. 13 - oil on canvas - 72 x 58 in.

LUC BERNARD

LUC BERNARD - Edges no. 14 - oil on canvas - 40 x 40 in.

LUC BERNARD

LUC BERNARD - Edges no. 15 - oil on canvas - 36 x 31 in.

LUC BERNARD

On loan courtesy of a private collection

SAM FRANCIS