Situada en la belleza salvaje de Jackson Hole, Wyoming, con los Parques Nacionales como un impresionante telón de fondo, Heather James Jackson ha traído el más alto calibre de obras de arte y servicios a la Intermontaña Oeste durante más de una década.

Atendiendo a la comunidad única que hace de Jackson Hole un destino incomparable para la cultura estadounidense y al aire libre, Heather James se esfuerza por ofrecer una selección inigualable de obras de arte y servicios de guante blanco para los lugareños y visitantes por igual.

172 Center Street, Suite 101
P.O. Box 3580
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
(307) 200-6090

Horario: Sólo con cita previa

Exposiciones

Andy Warhol: Todo es bonito
ACTUAL

Andy Warhol: Todo es bonito

17 de agosto de 2023 - 29 de febrero de 2024
Herb Alpert: Los cuadros del café
ACTUAL

Herb Alpert: Los cuadros del café

22 de diciembre de 2020 - 31 de marzo de 2024
Max Pellegrini: Silencio y fantasía
ACTUAL

Max Pellegrini: Silencio y fantasía

30 de julio de 2020 - 31 de marzo de 2024
Claude Monet: un genio del impresionismo
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Claude Monet: un genio del impresionismo

18 de agosto - 31 de octubre de 2022
Impresionismo en Heather James Fine Art
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Impresionismo en Heather James Fine Art

1 de septiembre - 31 de octubre de 2022
Jackson Hole - Top Works
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Jackson Hole - Top Works

15 de septiembre - 15 de octubre de 2022
Marc Chagall: El color del amor
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Marc Chagall: El color del amor

Del 8 de septiembre al 12 de octubre de 2022
Picasso - Grabados y obras sobre papel
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Picasso - Grabados y obras sobre papel

1 de septiembre - 12 de octubre de 2022
Todo lo que hemos visto: Paisajes impresionistas de Monet a Kleitsch
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Todo lo que hemos visto: Paisajes impresionistas de Monet a Kleitsch

9 de agosto de 2021 - 30 de septiembre de 2022
Retratos: Desde el siglo XIX hasta hoy
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Retratos: Desde el siglo XIX hasta hoy

26 de agosto de 2020 - 30 de abril de 2021
Maravillas del arte impresionista y moderno en América y Europa
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Maravillas del arte impresionista y moderno en América y Europa

26 de agosto de 2020 - 30 de abril de 2021
Jackson Hole: Lo más destacado desde 1900 hasta la actualidad
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Jackson Hole: Lo más destacado desde 1900 hasta la actualidad

1 de noviembre de 2019 - 31 de julio de 2020
Sam Francis: A la vista en Jackson Hole
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Sam Francis: A la vista en Jackson Hole

1 de julio - 15 de octubre de 2019
Edward Hopper
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Edward Hopper

1 de julio - 30 de septiembre de 2019
Andy Warhol
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Andy Warhol

16 de julio - 31 de agosto de 2019
Las pinturas de Sir Winston Churchill
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Las pinturas de Sir Winston Churchill

1 de agosto - 16 de septiembre de 2018
Elaine de Kooning
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Elaine de Kooning

1 de julio - 4 de agosto de 2018
Norman Rockwell: El artista en acción
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Norman Rockwell: El artista en acción

30 de junio - 30 de septiembre de 2016

OBRA DE ARTE A LA VISTA

Jim Dine era un artista pop americano cuyo trabajo meditaba sobre objetos con un atractivo infantil para encontrar un lenguaje universal y nostálgico. Las túnicas de Dine se encuentran entre las imágenes más reconocibles que han surgido de su larga e ilustre carrera. Se exhibieron por primera vez en la galería Sidney Janis en el otoño de 1964 - este es un ejemplo de ello. Double Silver Point Robes es un conjunto de medios mixtos a gran escala. La obra se ejecuta en punta de plata - una técnica que utiliza una pieza de plata como instrumento de dibujo sobre un terreno especialmente preparado por el cual se oxida durante un período de meses para crear un tono marrón cálido. Las dos telas unidas presentan bloques de madera en el lugar donde deben estar las cabezas y un elemento de madera colgante que se mueve en respuesta a las corrientes de aire.

JIM DINE

FERNANDO BOTERO - Autoretrato a la manera de Velázquez - sanguina y crayón sobre cartón - 60 1/2 x 47 1/2 in.

FERNANDO BOTERO

The essential and dramatic declaration “Let there be light” of Genesis is not so far removed from Mary Corse’s recollection of the moment in 1968 when the late afternoon sun electrified the reflective road markings of Malibu as she drove east. In an instant, the glowing asphalt markings provided the oracle she needed to realize she could ‘put light in the painting and not just make a picture of light’.  Using the same glass microbeads utilized by road maintenance services, she layers and embeds the prismatic material in bands and geometric configurations creating nuanced glimmering abstract fields which shift as the viewer moves in relationship to the work. Move to one side and dimness brightens to light. Walk back and forth and you might feel a rippling effect from its shimmering, prismatic effects.<br><br>A photographic image of a Mary Corse microsphere painting is not only a dull representation, but it also misses the point – it is experience dependent art that requires participation to ‘be’.  Of course, “Untitled” (1975) defies that one-point static perspective and instead, depends upon a real time, interactive art experience which heightens awareness of the body in space as the viewer experiences shifts of retinal stimulation, sensation and feeling. It is a rare bird.  Unusually petite at two-foot square, its design, geometry and color belie her earlier revelation that led to a devotion to her usual reductive palette. Instead, it is a bold statement in sequined color, its center field bounded at the corners by a sparkling red stepped motif that separates it from its starry night sky corner spandrels. It may not include a star motif, but it has the glamour and presence that belongs along Hollywood’s Walk of Fame.

CÓRCULO MARÍA

"Ray Gun became a catch title for all sorts of things. Looking down on the street, I would find this angle in the shape of a ray gun everywhere. And I would collect the ray guns. They became quite an obsession."<br>-Claes Oldenburg<br><br>"Two Ray Guns" (1964) was initially sold through the venerable Sidney Janis Gallery. The work draws upon Oldenburg's keen observational sense and fascination with science fiction and popular American culture. The fascination with Ray Guns became a conceptual art practice for Oldenburg; he would not construct them in the traditional sense but instead, find objects that could be reduced into the form. Ray Gun Examples exist in plastic, bronze, plaster, and many different media.  <br><br>Our example from the Ray Gun series has been in the same important American collection for many years. Several examples from this series are in prominent museum collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

CLAES OLDENBURG

CARLOS LUNA - La Mia (1225 OC) - óleo sobre lienzo - 47 x 58 in.

CARLOS LUNA

OLAF WIEGHORST - Apaches - óleo sobre lienzo - 20 x 24 in.

OLAF WIEGHORST

Signed, titled and dated ‘81 verso<br>JR-198-81

JACK ROTH

ARNE HIERSOUX - Mem Sahib - acrílico y papel sobre lienzo - 70 1/2 x 120 1/2 in.

ARNE HIERSOUX

ARNE HIERSOUX - Yonder Cisco - acrílico y papel sobre lienzo - 59 x 93 3/4 in.

ARNE HIERSOUX

Robert Rauschenberg, along with Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, and Roy Lichtenstein, started the revolution of Pop Art in the 1960s. Rauschenberg's later career was a time for the artist to work on experimental and innovative projects, including the 1993 "Prime Pump from ROCI USA (Wax Fire Works Series)." This series comes from the artist's philanthropic project, "ROCI USA," demonstrating "Rauschenberg's belief in the power of art as a catalyst for positive social change."  The reference to "wax fire" in the title is Rauschenberg's term for encaustic - hot wax with colored pigments - which he used in other works from the series. <br><br>Executed in a small edition of just 17 examples, this piece incorporates printmaking, a medium to which he often returned to explore new modes for layering imagery. Rauschenberg worked on editions since the early 1960s when he was a fixture at the ULAE and Gemini G.E.L. printshops.  Rauschenberg's printmaking and editioned works were an extension of the creative act for the artist; he could achieve sculptural and 3D effects through his editions.

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

FRANK TENNEY JOHNSON - Escultismo - óleo sobre lienzo - 13 1/2 x 17 pulg.

FRANK TENNEY JOHNSON

HASSEL SMITH - 9000 y 9 Noches - acrílico y grafito sobre lienzo - 68 x 68 1/8 in.

HASSEL SMITH

ROBERTO MATTA - L'epreuve - óleo sobre lienzo - 29 1/2 x 25 1/2 in.

ROBERTO MATTA

The Arts and Crafts Movement in Great Britain and the corresponding ripples that made their way across the Atlantic Ocean were felt in the work of Jesse Arms Botke (1883-1971).  Botke was born in Chicago, Illinois but found her home in California, where she had a successful career working first in Carmel and later in Southern California. <br><br>Rich textures, extensive use of gold leaf, and highly stylized birds would become synonymous with Botke's mature work as she established herself as one of the West Coast’s leading decorative mural painters of the 20th century.<br><br>"The White Peacock" (1922) shows an idyllic landscape with Botke's signature bird subject matter; the white peacock and cockatoos were among her favorite aviary subjects. Her work today can be found in countless museum collections, including the Art Institute, Chicago.

JESSIE ARMS BOTKE

ROBERT NATKIN - Serie Berna - acrílico sobre lienzo - 48 x 53 pulg.

ROBERT NATKIN

VICEPRESIDENTE PRIMERO

Andrea-WEB-POST

ANDREA RICO DAHLIN

Director Senior
Jackson Hole, Wyoming

A punto de cumplir 20 años en el sector, Andrea es licenciada en Historia del Arte con especialización en Bellas Artes por la Universidad de Binghamton (Nueva York ) y tiene un máster en Arte Moderno, Connoisseurship e Historia del Mercado del Arte por Christie's Education (Nueva York). Aporta su experiencia tanto en museos como en casas de subastas, habiendo trabajado en el Museo de Arte Nelson-Atkins de Kansas City y en Christie's de Nueva York.

Desde que se unió a Heather James Fine Art en 2015, Andrea ha asegurado consignaciones y ha ayudado a construir notables colecciones privadas y de museos con importantes artistas, que incluyen a Claude Monet, Alfred Sisley, Henri Matisse, Edgar Degas, Norman Rockwell, Andrew Wyeth, Elaine de Kooning, Andy Warhol y Tom Wesselmann.

EN LAS NOTICIAS

SERVICIOS

Heather James Fine Art ofrece una amplia gama de servicios basados en el cliente que se adaptan a sus necesidades específicas de coleccionismo de arte. Nuestro equipo de operaciones está formado por gestores profesionales de arte, un departamento de registro completo y un equipo logístico con amplia experiencia en el transporte, instalación y gestión de colecciones de arte. Con servicio de guante blanco y atención personalizada, nuestro equipo hace todo lo posible para garantizar servicios artísticos excepcionales para nuestros clientes.

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CONÓCENOS

ARTE DESTACADO

Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color.

GEORGIA O'KEEFFE

<br>In Diego Rivera’s portrait of Enriqueta Dávila, the artist asserts a Mexicanidad, a quality of Mexican-ness, in the work along with his strong feelings towards the sitter. Moreover, this painting is unique amongst his portraiture in its use of symbolism, giving us a strong if opaque picture of the relationship between artist and sitter.<br><br>Enriqueta, a descendent of the prominent Goldbaum family, was married to the theater entrepreneur, José María Dávila. The two were close friends with Rivera, and the artist initially requested to paint Enriqueta’s portrait. Enriqueta found the request unconventional and relented on the condition that Rivera paints her daughter, Enriqueta “Quetita”. Rivera captures the spirit of the mother through the use of duality in different sections of the painting, from the floorboards to her hands, and even the flowers. Why the split in the horizon of the floorboard? Why the prominent cross while Enriqueta’s family is Jewish? Even her pose is interesting, showcasing a woman in control of her own power, highlighted by her hand on her hip which Rivera referred to as a claw, further complicating our understanding of her stature.<br><br>This use of flowers, along with her “rebozo” or shawl, asserts a Mexican identity. Rivera was adept at including and centering flowers in his works which became a kind of signature device. The flowers show bromeliads and roselles; the former is epiphytic and the latter known as flor de jamaica and often used in hibiscus tea and aguas frescas. There is a tension then between these two flowers, emphasizing the complicated relationship between Enriqueta and Rivera. On the one hand, Rivera demonstrates both his and the sitter’s Mexican identity despite the foreign root of Enriqueta’s family but there may be more pointed meaning revealing Rivera’s feelings to the subject. The flowers, as they often do in still life paintings, may also refer to the fleeting nature of life and beauty. The portrait for her daughter shares some similarities from the use of shawl and flowers, but through simple changes in gestures and type and placement of flowers, Rivera illuminates a stronger personality in Enriqueta and a more dynamic relationship as filtered through his lens.<br><br>A closer examination of even her clothing reveals profound meaning. Instead of a dress more in line for a socialite, Rivera has Enriqueta in a regional dress from Jalisco, emphasizing both of their Mexican identities. On the other hand, her coral jewelry, repeated in the color of her shoes, hints at multiple meanings from foreignness and exoticism to protection and vitality. From Ancient Egypt to Classical Rome to today, coral has been used for jewelry and to have been believed to have properties both real and symbolic. Coral jewelry is seen in Renaissance paintings indicating the vitality and purity of woman or as a protective amulet for infants. It is also used as a reminder, when paired with the infant Jesus, of his future sacrifice. Diego’s use of coral recalls these Renaissance portraits, supported by the plain background of the painting and the ribbon indicating the maker and date similar to Old Master works.<br><br>When combined in the portrait of Enriqueta, we get a layered and tense building of symbolism. Rivera both emphasizes her Mexican identity but also her foreign roots. He symbolizes her beauty and vitality but look closely at half of her face and it is as if Rivera has painted his own features onto hers. The richness of symbolism hints at the complex relationship between artist and sitter.

DIEGO RIVERA

Según el catálogo razonado recopilado por el Brandywine River Museum of Art, el dibujo preliminar de Puritan Cod Fishers fue realizado por N. C. Wyeth antes de su muerte, en octubre de 1945. La entrada registra una imagen del boceto, así como las inscripciones del artista y su título, Puritan Cod Fishers, caracterizado por el catálogo como "alternativo". En cualquier caso, el lienzo a gran escala es una obra única que Andrew Wyeth recordaría más tarde que fue pintada únicamente por su mano, una colaboración delimitada del diseño y la composición del padre llevada a buen término por la ejecución de un hijo notable. Para Andrew, debió de ser una experiencia profundamente sentida y emotiva. Dada la atención de su padre a los detalles y la autenticidad, las líneas de la pequeña embarcación de vela representan un chalote, en uso durante el siglo XVI. Por otra parte, es probable que Andrew intensificara los matices del inquieto mar más de lo que lo hubiera hecho su padre, una elección que realza adecuadamente la peligrosa naturaleza de la tarea.

Andrew Wyeth y N. C. Wyeth

WILLEM DE KOONING - Mujer en un bote de remos - óleo sobre papel colocado sobre masonita - 47 1/2 x 36 1/4 in.

WILLEM DE KOONING

Having unwittingly inserted himself into the Pop Art conversation with his Great American Nude series, Tom Wesselmann spent the rest of his career explaining that his motivation was not to focus excessively on a subject matter or to generate social commentary but instead, to give form to what titillated him most as beautiful and exciting. His disembodied Mouth series of 1965 established that an image did not have to rely on extraneous elements to communicate meaning. But it was his follow-up performances with the Smoker series and its seductive, fetish allure that raised his standing among true sybarites everywhere. Apart from perceiving smoking as cool and chic, a painting such as Smoker #21 is the consummate celebration of Wesselmann’s abilities as a painter. Enticed by the undulating smoke, Wesselmann took great pains to accurately depict its sinuous movements and observe the momentary pauses that heightened his appreciation of its sensual nature. Like all of Wesselmann’s prodigious scaled artworks, Smoker #21 has the commanding presence of an altarpiece. It was produced during long hours in his impressive Manhattan studio in Cooper Square, and the result is one of sultry dynamism — evocative, sensual, alluring, sleek, luscious, and perhaps, even sinister — a painting that flaunts his graphic supremacy and potent realism varnished with his patented sex appeal flair.<br><br>Tom Wesselmann expanded upon the success of his Great American Nudes by focusing on singular features of his subjects and began painting his Mouth series in 1965. In 1967, Wesselmann’s friend Peggy Sarno paused for a cigarette while modeling for Wesselmann’s Mouth series, inspiring his Smoker paintings. The whisps of smoke were challenging to paint and required Wesselmann to utilize photographs as source material to capture the smoke’s ephemeral nature properly. The images here show Wesselmann photographing his friend, the screenwriter Danièle Thompson, as she posed for some of Wesselmann’s source images.

TOM WESSELMANN

Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight.

ALFRED SISLEY

Alexander Calder executed a surprising number of oil paintings during the second half of the 1940s and early 1950s. By this time, the shock of his 1930 visit to Mondrian’s studio, where he was impressed not by the paintings but by the environment, had developed into an artistic language of Calder’s own. So, as Calder was painting The Cross in 1948, he was already on the cusp of international recognition and on his way to winning the XX VI Venice Biennale’s grand prize for sculpture in 1952. Working on his paintings in concert with his sculptural practice, Calder approached both mediums with the same formal language and mastery of shape and color.<br><br>Calder was deeply intrigued by the unseen forces that keep objects in motion. Taking this interest from sculpture to canvas, we see that Calder built a sense of torque within The Cross by shifting its planes and balance. Using these elements, he created implied motion suggesting that the figure is pressing forward or even descending from the skies above. The Cross’s determined momentum is further amplified by details such as the subject’s emphatically outstretched arms, the fist-like curlicue vector on the left, and the silhouetted serpentine figure.<br><br>Calder also adopts a strong thread of poetic abandon throughout The Cross’s surface. It resonates with his good friend Miró’s hieratic and distinctly personal visual language, but it is all Calder in the effective animation of this painting’s various elements. No artist has earned more poetic license than Calder, and throughout his career, the artist remained convivially flexible in his understanding of form and composition. He even welcomed the myriad interpretations of others, writing in 1951, “That others grasp what I have in mind seems unessential, at least as long as they have something else in theirs.”<br><br>Either way, it is important to remember that The Cross was painted shortly after the upheaval of the Second World War and to some appears to be a sobering reflection of the time. Most of all, The Cross proves that Alexander Calder loaded his brush first to work out ideas about form, structure, relationships in space, and most importantly, movement.

ALEXANDER CALDER

Trained as a woodcarver, Emil Nolde was almost 30 years old before he made his first paintings. The early paintings resembled his drawings and woodcuts: grotesque figures with bold lines and strong contrasts. The style was new, and it inspired the nascent movement Die Brücke (The Bridge), whose members invited Nolde to join them in 1906.  But, it was not until the garden became his locus operandi by 1915 that he built upon his mastery of contrasting luminosities to focus on color as the supreme means of expression.  Later, Nolde claimed “color is strength, strength is life,” and he could not have better characterized why his flower paintings reinvigorate our perception of color.<br><br>Much of the strength of Nolde’s dramatic, Wagnerian-like color sensibilities is the effect of staging primary colors, such as the deep reds and golden yellows of Sonnenblumen, Abend II, against a somber palette. The contrast highlights and deepens the luminosity of the flowers, not just visually, but emotionally as well. In 1937, when Nolde’s art was rejected, confiscated, and defiled, his paintings were paraded as “degenerate art” throughout Nazi Germany in dimly lit galleries. Despite that treatment, Nolde’s status as a degenerate artist gave his art more breathing space because he seized the opportunity to produce more than 1,300 watercolors, which he called “unpainted pictures.” No novice in handling watercolor, his free-flowing style of painting had been a hallmark of his highly-charge, transparent washes since 1918. Sonnenblumen, Abend II, painted in 1944, is a rare wartime oil. He let his imagination run wild with this work, and his utilization of wet-on-wet techniques heightened the drama of each petal.<br><br>Nolde’s intense preoccupation with color and flowers, particularly sunflowers, reflects his continuing devotion to van Gogh.  He was aware of van Gogh as early as 1899 and, during the 1920s and early 1930s, visited several exhibitions of the Dutch artist’s work.  They shared a profound love of nature. Nolde’s dedication to expression and the symbolic use of color found fullness in the sunflower subject, and it became a personal symbol for him, as it did for Van Gogh.

EMIL NOLDE

A principios de la década de 1870, Winslow Homer pintaba con frecuencia escenas de la vida en el campo cerca de una pequeña aldea agrícola famosa durante generaciones por sus notables plantaciones de trigo, situada entre el río Hudson y los Catskills, en el estado de Nueva York. Hoy en día Hurley es mucho más famoso por haber inspirado una de las mayores obras de Homer, Snap the Whip (Chasquear el látigo), pintada el verano de 1872. Entre los muchos otros cuadros inspirados en la región, Muchacha de pie en el campo de trigo es rico en sentimientos, pero no demasiado sentimentalista. Está directamente relacionado con un estudio de 1866 pintado en Francia y titulado In the Wheatfields (En los campos de trigo), y con otro pintado al año siguiente de su regreso a América. Pero, sin duda, Homero se habría sentido más orgulloso de éste. Se trata de un retrato, un estudio de vestuario, un cuadro de género en la gran tradición de la pintura pastoril europea, y un espectacular tour de force atmosférico a contraluz, impregnado de la luz de las horas crepusculares que se desvanece rápidamente, animado con notas lambiscentes y floridas y toques de espigas de trigo. En 1874, Homer envió cuatro cuadros a la exposición de la Academia Nacional de Diseño. Uno se titulaba "Muchacha". ¿No podría ser éste?

WINSLOW HOMER

Emerging at the end of the Gilded Age, N.C. Wyeth was one of the most important American artists and illustrators. His paintings and illustrations brought life to classic literature from Treasure Island to The Boy’s King Arthur and more. He is most remembered for his ability to capture crucial moments in narratives, fleshing out just a few words into a visual representation of deep drama and tension. Patriarch of the Wyeth artistic dynasty which includes his son Andrew and grandson Jamie, his influence touched future illustrators and artists.<br><br>Perhaps his most important legacy is how he shaped American imagination – of America itself and of wild possibilities. Wyeth’s powerful paintings gave life to many of the stories America told of itself. His early paintings captured life of the American West and some of his most beloved illustrations were for novels such as The Last of the Mohicans or short stories like “Rip Van Winkle”. Despite this success, Wyeth struggled with the commercialism of illustrations and advertisements, seeking his work to be accepted as fine art. Throughout his career, he experimented with different styles shifting from Impressionism to Divisionism to Regionalism.<br><br>N.C. Wyeth produced over 3,000 paintings and illustrated 112 books. His illustrations for the publisher Charles Scribner’s Sons were so popular they became known as Scribner’s Classics and remain in print to this day.<br><br>This quietly powerful painting of a Native American forms part of a quartet of paintings, inspired by and a metaphor for the four seasons. The paintings were used to illustrate George T. Marsh’s set of poems “The Moods”. Wyeth recognized that the series came at a crucial moment in his career in which the paintings go beyond realism to capture atmosphere and mood, an internal world of emotion made external. He even contemplated and attempted to write his own poems based on these paintings.<br> <br><br>Summer, Hush is a striking example of Wyeth pulling from his imagination and melding it with careful observation of nature. As noted in a letter to his mother, Wyeth combined the fictional subject with natural effects as in the sky. Native Americans were a subject he returned to numerous times; these paintings reflect not only Wyeth’s fascination but also of America. As observed by art historian Krstine Ronan, Wyeth was part of a larger dialogue that developed around Native Americans, cementing a general Native American culture in the imagination of the United States. Thus, the painting operates on numerous levels simultaneously. How do we relate to this painting and its conception of the four seasons? How do we interpret Wyeth’s depiction of a Native American? What role do Native Americans play in America’s imagination?<br><br>We must also not forget that these works were first used to illustrate the poems of George T. Marsh. Marsh, a poet born in New York who often also wrote of the Canadian wilderness, provides subtle evocations of the seasons hinted at in the series title “The Moods”. This painting was used alongside “Hush,” which ends:<br><br>Are they runes of summers perished<br><br>That the fisher hears –and ceases—<br><br>Or the voice of one he cherished.<br><br>Within these few lines, Wyeth gives us a thoughtful and restrained painting that stirs from within. The poem and the painting avoid obvious clichés to represent the seasons. They develop a profound interpretation filled with sensitivity.<br><br>These paintings were important to Wyeth who hoped that “they may suggest to some architect the idea that such decorations would be appropriate in a library or capitol or some public building.” Summer, Hush demonstrates Wyeth’s control of color and composition so that small touches such as the ripples of water or the towering cloud that envelopes the figure are in service to sketch out the feeling of summer and of the poem. Through exploring this rich and complex painting, we are better able to appreciate NC Wyeth as an artist and the role this specific painting plays in the context of art history.

N.C. WYETH

The frame of reference for Irish American Sean Scully’s signature blocks and stripes is vast. From Malevich’s central premise that geometry can provide the means for universal understanding to Rothko’s impassioned approach to color and rendering of the dramatic sublime, Scully learned how to condense the splendor of the natural world into simple modes of color, light, and composition. Born in Dublin in 1945 and London-raised, Scully was well-schooled in figurative drawing when he decided to catch the spirit of his lodestar, Henri Matisse, by visiting Morocco in 1969. He was captivated by the dazzling tessellated mosaics and richly dyed fabrics and began to paint grids and stipes of color. Subsequent adventures provided further inspiration as the play of intense light on the reflective surfaces of Mayan ruins and the ancient slabs of stone at Stonehenge brought the sensation of light, space, and geometric movement to Scully’s paintings. The ability to trace the impact of Scully’s travels throughout his paintings reaffirms the value of abstract art as a touchstone for real-life experience.<br><br><br>Painted in rich, deep hues and layered, nuanced surfaces, Grey Red is both poetic and full of muscular formalism. Scully appropriately refers to these elemental forms as ‘bricks,’ suggesting the formal calculations of an architect. As he explained, “these relationships that I see in the street doorways, in windows between buildings, and in the traces of structures that were once full of life, I take for my work. I use these colors and forms and put them together in a way that perhaps reminds you of something, though you’re not sure of that” (David Carrier, Sean Scully, 2004, pg. 98). His approach is organic, less formulaic; intuitive painter’s choices are layering one color upon another so that contrasting hues and colors vibrate with subliminal energy. Diebenkorn comes to mind in his pursuit of radiant light. But here, the radiant bands of terracotta red, gray, taupe, and black of Grey Red resonate with deep, smoldering energy and evoke far more affecting passion than you would think it could impart. As his good friend, Bono wrote, “Sean approaches the canvas like a kickboxer, a plasterer, a builder. The quality of painting screams of a life being lived.”

SEAN SCULLY

El mundo de Marc Chagall no puede ser contenido ni limitado por las etiquetas que le ponemos. Es un mundo de imágenes y significados que forman su propio discurso espléndidamente místico. Les Mariés sous le baldaquin (Los novios bajo el baldaquín) fue iniciado cuando el artista entraba en su nonagésimo año, un hombre que había conocido la tragedia y la lucha, pero que nunca olvidó los momentos de placer arrebatador de la vida. Aquí, las delicias de ensueño de una boda en un pueblo ruso, con sus arreglos de asistentes bien vestidos, se nos presentan con un ingenio tan feliz y una inocencia tan alegre que no hay quien se resista a su encanto. Utilizando una emulsión de tonos dorados que combina óleo y aguada opaca al agua, la calidez, la alegría y el optimismo del positivismo habitual de Chagall se envuelven en un resplandor luminoso que sugiere la influencia de los iconos religiosos dorados o de la pintura del Renacimiento temprano que pretendía transmitir la impresión de luz divina o iluminación espiritual. Utilizar una combinación de óleo y gouache puede ser todo un reto. Pero aquí, en Les Mariés sous le baldaquin, Chagall lo emplea para dar a la escena una calidad de otro mundo, casi como si acabara de materializarse a partir del ojo de su mente. La delicadeza de su textura crea la impresión de que la luz emana de la propia obra y confiere un carácter espectral a las figuras que flotan en el cielo.

MARC CHAGALL

Tom Wesselmann will undoubtedly be remembered for associating his erotic themes with the colors of the American flag. But Wesselmann had considerable gifts as a draftsman, and the line was his principal preoccupation, first as a cartoonist and later as an ardent admirer of Matisse. That he also pioneered a method of turning drawings into laser-cut steel wall reliefs proved a revelation. He began to focus ever more on drawing for the sake of drawing, enchanted that the new medium could be lifted and held: “It really is like being able to pick up a delicate line drawing from the paper.”<br><br>The Steel Drawings caused both excitement and confusion in the art world. After acquiring one of the ground-breaking works in 1985, the Whitney Museum of American Art wrote Wesselmann wondering if it should be cataloged as a drawing or a sculpture. The work had caused such a stir that when Eric Fischl visited Wesselmann at his studio and saw steel-cut works for the first time, he remembered feeling jealous. He wanted to try it but dared not. It was clear: ‘Tom owned the technique completely.’<br><br>Wesselmann owed much of that technique to his year-long collaboration with metalwork fabricator Alfred Lippincott. Together, in 1984 they honed a method for cutting the steel with a laser that provided the precision he needed to show the spontaneity of his sketches. Wesselmann called it ‘the best year of my life’, elated at the results that he never fully achieved with aluminum that required each shape be hand-cut.  “I anticipated how exciting it would be for me to get a drawing back in steel. I could hold it in my hands. I could pick it up by the lines…it was so exciting…a kind of near ecstasy, anyway, but there’s really been something about the new work that grabbed me.”<br><br>Bedroom Brunette with Irises is a Steel Drawing masterwork that despite its uber-generous scale, utilizes tight cropping to provide an unimposing intimacy while maintaining a free and spontaneous quality. The figure’s outstretched arms and limbs and body intertwine with the petals and the interior elements providing a flowing investigative foray of black lines and white ‘drop out’ shapes provided by the wall. It recalls Matisse and any number of his reclining odalisque paintings. Wesselmann often tested monochromatic values to discover the extent to which color would transform his hybrid objects into newly developed Steel Drawing works and, in this case, continued with a color steel-cut version of the composition Bedroom Blonde with Irises (1987) and later still, in 1993 with a large-scale drawing in charcoal and pastel on paper.

TOM WESSELMANN

Shortly after arriving in Paris by April 1912, Marsden Hartley received an invitation. It had come from Gertrude Stein and what he saw at her 27 rue de Fleurus flat stunned him. Despite his presumptions and preparedness, “I had to get used to so much of everything all at once…a room full of staggering pictures, a room full of strangers and two remarkable looking women, Alice and Gertrude Stein…I went often I think after that on Saturday evenings — always thinking, in my reserved New England tone, ‘ how do people do things like that — let everyone in off the street to look at their pictures?… So one got to see a vast array of astounding pictures — all burning with life and new ideas — and as strange as the ideas seemed to be — all of them terrifically stimulating — a new kind of words for an old theme.” (Susan Elizabeth Ryan, The Autobiography of Marsden Hartley, pg. 77)<br><br>The repeated visits had a profound effect. Later that year, Hartley was clearly disappointed when Arthur B. Davies and Walt Kuhn chose two of his still-life paintings for the upcoming New York Armory show in February 1913. “He (Kuhn) speaks highly of them (but) I would not have chosen them myself chiefly because I am so interested at this time in the directly abstract things of the present. But Davies says that no American has done this kind of thing and they would (not) serve me and the exhibition best at this time.” (Correspondence, Marsden Hartley to Alfred Stieglitz, early November 1912) A month later, he announced his departure from formal representationalism in “favor of intuitive abstraction…a variety of expression I find to be closest to my temperament and ideals. It is not like anything here. It is not like Picasso, it is not like Kandinsky, not like any cubism. For want of a better name, subliminal or cosmic cubism.” (Correspondence, Marsden Hartley to Alfred Stieglitz, December 1912)<br><br>At the time, Hartley consumed Wassily Kandinsky’s recently published treatise Uber das Geistige in der Kunst (The Art of Spiritual Harmony) and Stieglitz followed the artist’s thoughts with great interest. For certain, they both embraced musical analogy as an opportunity for establishing a new visual language of abstraction. Their shared interest in the synergetic effects of music and art can be traced to at least 1909 when Hartley exhibited landscape paintings of Maine under titles such as “Songs of Autumn” and “Songs of Winter” at the 291 Gallery. The gravity of Hartley’s response to the treatise likely sparked Stieglitz’s determination to purchase Kandinsky’s seminal painting Improvisation no. 27 (Garden of Love II) at the Armory Show. As for Hartley, he announced to his niece his conviction that an aural/vision synesthetic pairing of art and music was a way forward for modern art. “Did you ever hear of anyone trying to paint music — or the equivalent of sound in color?…there is only one artist in Europe working on it (Wassily Kandinsky) and he is a pure theorist and his work is quite without feeling — whereas I work wholly from intuition and the subliminal.” (D. Cassidy, Painting the Musical City: Jazz and Cultural Identity in American Art, Washington, D.C., pg. 6)<br><br>In Paris, during 1912 and 1913 Hartley was inspired to create a series of six musically themed oil paintings, the first of which, Bach Preludes et Fugues, no. 1 (Musical Theme), incorporates strong Cubist elements as well as Kandinsky’s essential spirituality and synesthesia. Here, incorporating both elements seems particularly appropriate. Whereas Kandinsky’s concepts were inspired by Arnold Schoenberg’s twelve-tone method of composition whereby no note could be reused until the other eleven had been played, Hartley chose Bach’s highly structured, rigorously controlled twenty-four Preludes and Fugues from his Well-Tempered Clavier, each of which establishes an absolute tonality. The towering grid of Bach Preludes et Fugues, no. 1 suggests the formal structure of an organ, its pipes ever-rising under a high, vaulted church ceiling to which Hartley extends an invitation to stand within the lower portion of the picture plane amongst the triangular and circular ‘sound tesserae’ and absorb its essential sonority and deeply reverberating sound. All of it is cast with gradients of color that conjures an impression of Cézanne’s conceptual approach rather than Picasso’s, Analytic Cubism. Yet Bach Preludes et Fugues, no. 1, in its entirety suggests the formal structural of Picasso’s Maisons à Horta (Houses on the Hill, Horta de Ebro), one of the many Picasso paintings Gertrude Stein owned and presumably staged in her residence on the many occasions he came to visit.

MARSDEN HARTLEY

El Retrato de Sylvie Lacombe de Théo van Rysselberghe, pintado en 1906, es una obra maestra clásica de uno de los retratistas más refinados y coherentes de su época. El color es armonioso, la pincelada vigorosa y adaptada a su tarea material, su cuerpo y su semblante verdaderos y reveladores. La modelo es la hija de su buen amigo, el pintor Georges Lacombe, que compartió una estrecha asociación con Gauguin y fue miembro de Les Nabis con los artistas Bonnard, Denis y Vuillard, entre otros. Ahora conocemos a Sylvie Lacombe porque Van Rysselberghe es muy hábil en la representación de sutiles expresiones faciales y, a través de una cuidadosa observación y atención al detalle, nos ha proporcionado una visión de su mundo interior. Ha elegido una mirada directa, sus ojos a los tuyos, un pacto ineludible entre sujeto y espectador independientemente de nuestra relación física con el cuadro. Van Rysselberghe había abandonado en gran medida la técnica puntillista cuando pintó este retrato. Sin embargo, siguió aplicando las directrices de la teoría del color, utilizando tintes rojos -rosas y malvas- frente a verdes para crear una armoniosa paleta ameliorada de colores complementarios a la que añadió un fuerte acento para atraer la mirada: un lazo rojo intensamente saturado colocado asimétricamente a un lado de la cabeza.

THÉO VAN RYSSELBERGHE

No es difícil comprender cómo la brillante disposición en dos filas de cuatro letras de Robert Indiana llegó a contribuir a potenciar un movimiento durante la década de 1960. Su origen surgió de una profunda exposición a la religión y de su amigo y mentor Ellsworth Kelly, cuyo estilo de bordes duros y color sensual y sin acentos causó una impresión duradera. Pero como Indiana exclamó, fue un momento de kismet que simplemente sucedió cuando "¡EL AMOR me mordió!" y el diseño le llegó nítido y centrado. Indiana, por supuesto, sometió el diseño a muchas pruebas, y entonces el logotipo empezó a brotar por todas partes. El mensaje, que se transmite mejor en forma de escultura, está presente en ciudades de todo el mundo y se ha traducido a varios idiomas, entre ellos su iteración italiana, "Amor", con su fortuita "O" también inclinada hacia la derecha. Pero en lugar de ser pateada por el pie de la "L", esta versión confiere a la "A" superior un efecto de tambaleo bellamente escenificado. Da una impresión nueva, pero no menos profunda, del amor y de su naturaleza emocionalmente cargada.  En cualquier caso, la "O" inclinada de Love imparte inestabilidad a un diseño por lo demás estable, una profunda proyección de la crítica implícita de Indiana al "sentimentalismo a menudo hueco asociado con la palabra, que metafóricamente sugiere anhelo y decepción no correspondidos en lugar de afecto sacarino" (Robert Indiana's Best: A Mini Retrospective, New York Times, 24 de mayo de 2018). La repetición, por supuesto, tiene la mala costumbre de empañar nuestro aprecio por el genio de la simplicidad y el diseño innovador. A finales de su vida, Indiana se lamentó de que "fue una idea maravillosa, pero también un terrible error. Se hizo demasiado popular. Y hay gente a la que no le gusta la popularidad". Pero nosotros, habitantes de un mundo plagado de divisiones y sumido en la confusión, se lo agradecemos. "Love" y sus muchas versiones nos recuerdan con fuerza nuestra capacidad de amar, y esa es nuestra mejor esperanza eterna de un futuro mejor.

ROBERT INDIANA

FRANK STELLA - The Musket - técnica mixta sobre aluminio - 74 1/2 x 77 1/2 x 33 in.

FRANK STELLA

SALOMON VAN RUYSDAEL - Un paisaje de dunas con figuras descansando y una pareja a caballo, una vista de la catedral de Nimega más allá - óleo sobre lienzo - 26 1/2 x 41 1/2 pulg.

SALOMON VAN RUYSDAEL

JOAN MIRO - L'Oiseau - bronce y bloque de hormigón - 23 7/8 x 20 x 16 1/8 in.

JOAN MIRO

JAN JOSEPHSZOON VAN GOYEN - Paisaje fluvial con molino de viento y capilla - óleo sobre tabla - 22 1/2 x 31 3/4 pulg.

JAN JOSEPHSZOON VAN GOYEN

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