Situated in the wild beauty of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, with National Parks as a stunning backdrop, Heather James Jackson has brought the highest caliber of artworks and services to the Intermountain West for almost a decade.

Catering to the unique community that makes Jackson Hole an unparalleled destination for American culture and the outdoors, Heather James strives to provide an unmatched selection of artworks and white glove services for locals and visitors alike.

172 Center Street, Suite 101
P.O. Box 3580
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
(307) 200-6090

Hours:
Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Edward Hopper
CURRENT

Edward Hopper

July 1 - September 30, 2019
Sam Francis: On View in Jackson Hole
CURRENT

Sam Francis: On View in Jackson Hole

July 1 - October 15, 2019
Herb Alpert: A Visual Melody
ARCHIVE

Herb Alpert: A Visual Melody

August 1 - September 30, 2018
The Paintings of Sir Winston Churchill
ARCHIVE

The Paintings of Sir Winston Churchill

August 1 - September 16, 2018
Elaine de Kooning
ARCHIVE

Elaine de Kooning

July 1 - August 4, 2018
N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.

N.C. WYETH

GRANVILLE REDMOND - The Evening Desert - oil on canvas - 41 x 49 in.

GRANVILLE REDMOND

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD - Yellow River - steel - 26 x 96 x 56 in.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD

N.C. WYETH - With a Quick, Noiseless Stride, He Crossed the Narrow Space - oil on canvas - 30 1/4 x 20 1/8 in.

N.C. WYETH

EDWARD HOPPER - Church and Landscape - oil on canvas - 10 x 14 in.

EDWARD HOPPER

SAM FRANCIS - Untitled 1985, San Leandro - acrylic on canvas mounted on board - 44 x 52 in.

SAM FRANCIS

A leading artist of the Arte Povera movement in the 1960s and '70s, Jannis Kounellis challenged the traditional media of art making. His work often incorporates natural or everyday materials, installation, or performance. Untitled (2014) is a unique example of his sculptural work in iron, canvas, and enamel. A common thread in his work is a sense of isolation experienced in contemporary society, combining elements of the past and the present to address memory, detachment, history, and loss. Kounellis once explained, “[art] must be born of historical necessity: that is, it must be of a historical situation and constitute the indispensable language of that moment.”

JANNIS KOUNELLIS

American artist Robert Rauschenberg helped to revolutionize art in the 20th century through his assemblages incorporating found objects and pop culture. For the Hoarfrost series, Rauschenberg used solvent to transfer images from newspapers and magazines to unstretched fabric. Hoarfrost is a kind of lacy film made up of minute, needle-like ice crystals. Rauschenberg evoked the transience of the hoarfrost by printing newspaper and magazine pages on overlapping layers of delicate fabrics. Other pieces in this series are in the collections of The Guggenheim, MoMA, SF MOMA, the National Gallery of Art and Tate.

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

Peaks of St. Gervais is one of the artist’s classic landscapes, with his distinctive swift brushstroke and charming town and structures — half of which he rendered in the shade — dwarfed by the snow-capped mountain. In most of his paintings, Payne used structures and figures not as subject, but to communicate the dramatic scale of mountain landscape. Drawn to the mountains of Europe, Payne trekked and painted the Swiss Alps, the colorful harbors of Brittany and France, and the sailing vessels in Italy.

EDGAR ALWIN PAYNE

More than an artist, Theaster Gates also works as curator, urban planner, and project facilitator. From sculpture to painting, installation to public projects, Gates’s works are hubs in which to question labor and commodity while also bringing to the fore people and things that are often unseen and unheard. Convex Concave takes custom-made bricks that Gates had previously used for Black Vessel for a Saint at the Walker Art Center and repurposes it into a painting-like sculpture that references minimalist artist like Sol LeWitt, the labor of making bricks, and the original context of the bricks for the installation at the Walker.

THEASTER GATES

CHUCK CLOSE - Self-Portrait, 2000 - screenprint on paper - 58 1/3 x 48 in.

CHUCK CLOSE

WILLIAM MORRIS - Fallow Deer Situla - blown glass - 16 x 23 1/2 x 13 in.

WILLIAM MORRIS

N.C. Wyeth is regarded as a father of American Illustration, and his prolific career was marked by artworks with distinctive personality and majestic storytelling. In Don, Pointer Dog (1902), the artist brings his sense of majesty to a personal context. Wyeth was twenty years old when he painted the charming canine portrait, a special commission for a family he met in Massachusetts while on a walking trip with his brothers.

N.C. WYETH

HANS HOFMANN - Purple Tree - casein on board - 20 x 24 in.

HANS HOFMANN

THEASTER GATES - Lathe Black Box - wood, glass and lathe - 50 1/4 x 53 x 6 7/8 in.

THEASTER GATES

GEORGE CONDO - Girl With Bow Tie - oil on canvas - 39 1/4 x 28 3/4 in

GEORGE CONDO

TIM HAWKINSON - Untitled (Painting) - enamel on paper on wood - 89 x 38 in.

TIM HAWKINSON

MARY ABBOTT - Presence - oil on canvas - 46 x 87 in.

MARY ABBOTT

HERB ALPERT - Embrace - bronze with gold patina - 83 x 27 x 27 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Tsunami - acrylic on canvas - 72 x 120 in.

HERB ALPERT

VIK MUNIZ - Spatial Concept, Expectations, After Lucio Fontana (Pictures of Pigment) - chromogenic print - 71 x 71 1/2 in.

VIK MUNIZ

THEASTER GATES - Stand-Ins for Period of Wreckage 25 - white concrete and porcelain - 48 x 12 x 12 in.

THEASTER GATES

GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in.

GUILLERMO KUITCA

Warhol began depicting the "Hammer and Sickle" in 1976 after seeing the symbol from the Soviet flag used in graffiti while visiting Italy. The icon represents the union of industrial and farm workers’ interests. To Warhol, the symbol was more Pop than politics. One of his assistants scoured books for reproductions and ultimately purchased a double-headed hammer and a sickle and arranged them in different positions to photograph. Warhol used the images for his series of silkscreens, which New York’s Castelli Gallery exhibited in 1977. His almost expressionist use of the hammer and sickle diffuses some of the Cold War tension that prevailed from the early 1940s through the 1980s.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Vote McGovern - screenprint - 42 x 42 in.

ANDY WARHOL

HANS HOFMANN - Yellow Vase - oil on panel - 8 x 7 1/2 in.

HANS HOFMANN

DAMIEN HIRST - The Souls on Jacob's Ladder Take Their Flight - color photogravure etching - 47 1/2 x 43 1/4 in.

DAMIEN HIRST

ROBERT NATKIN - Bern Series (#421) - acrylic on canvas - 34 x 46 in.

ROBERT NATKIN

HERB ALPERT - El Toro Solitario (The Lonely Bull) - bronze - 17 x 33 1/2 x 14 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Eagle Falls - bronze - 41 1/2 x 10 x 10 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Magic Man - bronze - 43 x 8 x 8 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - First Impression - bronze - 37 3/4 x 8 x 8 in.

HERB ALPERT

WILLIAM LESTER STEVENS - A River in Winter - oil on canvas - 25 x 30 1/8 in.

WILLIAM LESTER STEVENS

ANDY WARHOL - Martin Buber (from Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth
Century) - screenprint - 40 x 32 in.

ANDY WARHOL

LUC BERNARD - Edges no. 13 - oil on canvas - 72 x 58 in.

LUC BERNARD

LUC BERNARD - Edges no. 14 - oil on canvas - 40 x 40 in.

LUC BERNARD

LUC BERNARD - Edges no. 15 - oil on canvas - 36 x 31 in.

LUC BERNARD

On loan courtesy of a private collection

SAM FRANCIS