JIM DINE (b. 1935)

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Bathrobes appeared as a visual motif in Jim Dine’s paintings and prints beginning in 1964, when the artist saw a bathrobe advertisement in a newspaper. Early examples of his bathrobe paintings were identified in their titles as “self portraits.” As Dine later explained, “I probably visualized the axe, the log, and the bathrobe as an extension of myself--a self portrait.” 
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<br>Dine’s bathrobe paintings were first shown at Sidney Janis gallery in the fall of 1964 – this is one such example – and are among the most recognizable images to have emerged from his long and illustrious career. Double Silver Point Robes is a large scale mixed media assemblage. The drawing is executed in silverpoint – a technique where a piece of silver is used as a drawing implement over a specially prepared ground. The silver drawing oxidizes over a period of several months, finally settling to a warm brown tone which can be seen in Double Silver Point Robes. The two joined canvases have blocks of wood in place of where the figure’s head should be. The block on the right has a knife protruding from it, and a hanging wood element that moves in respond to air currents.Bathrobes appeared as a visual motif in Jim Dine’s paintings and prints beginning in 1964, when the artist saw a bathrobe advertisement in a newspaper. Early examples of his bathrobe paintings were identified in their titles as “self portraits.” As Dine later explained, “I probably visualized the axe, the log, and the bathrobe as an extension of myself--a self portrait.” 
<br>
<br>Dine’s bathrobe paintings were first shown at Sidney Janis gallery in the fall of 1964 – this is one such example – and are among the most recognizable images to have emerged from his long and illustrious career. Double Silver Point Robes is a large scale mixed media assemblage. The drawing is executed in silverpoint – a technique where a piece of silver is used as a drawing implement over a specially prepared ground. The silver drawing oxidizes over a period of several months, finally settling to a warm brown tone which can be seen in Double Silver Point Robes. The two joined canvases have blocks of wood in place of where the figure’s head should be. The block on the right has a knife protruding from it, and a hanging wood element that moves in respond to air currents.Bathrobes appeared as a visual motif in Jim Dine’s paintings and prints beginning in 1964, when the artist saw a bathrobe advertisement in a newspaper. Early examples of his bathrobe paintings were identified in their titles as “self portraits.” As Dine later explained, “I probably visualized the axe, the log, and the bathrobe as an extension of myself--a self portrait.” 
<br>
<br>Dine’s bathrobe paintings were first shown at Sidney Janis gallery in the fall of 1964 – this is one such example – and are among the most recognizable images to have emerged from his long and illustrious career. Double Silver Point Robes is a large scale mixed media assemblage. The drawing is executed in silverpoint – a technique where a piece of silver is used as a drawing implement over a specially prepared ground. The silver drawing oxidizes over a period of several months, finally settling to a warm brown tone which can be seen in Double Silver Point Robes. The two joined canvases have blocks of wood in place of where the figure’s head should be. The block on the right has a knife protruding from it, and a hanging wood element that moves in respond to air currents.Bathrobes appeared as a visual motif in Jim Dine’s paintings and prints beginning in 1964, when the artist saw a bathrobe advertisement in a newspaper. Early examples of his bathrobe paintings were identified in their titles as “self portraits.” As Dine later explained, “I probably visualized the axe, the log, and the bathrobe as an extension of myself--a self portrait.” 
<br>
<br>Dine’s bathrobe paintings were first shown at Sidney Janis gallery in the fall of 1964 – this is one such example – and are among the most recognizable images to have emerged from his long and illustrious career. Double Silver Point Robes is a large scale mixed media assemblage. The drawing is executed in silverpoint – a technique where a piece of silver is used as a drawing implement over a specially prepared ground. The silver drawing oxidizes over a period of several months, finally settling to a warm brown tone which can be seen in Double Silver Point Robes. The two joined canvases have blocks of wood in place of where the figure’s head should be. The block on the right has a knife protruding from it, and a hanging wood element that moves in respond to air currents.Bathrobes appeared as a visual motif in Jim Dine’s paintings and prints beginning in 1964, when the artist saw a bathrobe advertisement in a newspaper. Early examples of his bathrobe paintings were identified in their titles as “self portraits.” As Dine later explained, “I probably visualized the axe, the log, and the bathrobe as an extension of myself--a self portrait.” 
<br>
<br>Dine’s bathrobe paintings were first shown at Sidney Janis gallery in the fall of 1964 – this is one such example – and are among the most recognizable images to have emerged from his long and illustrious career. Double Silver Point Robes is a large scale mixed media assemblage. The drawing is executed in silverpoint – a technique where a piece of silver is used as a drawing implement over a specially prepared ground. The silver drawing oxidizes over a period of several months, finally settling to a warm brown tone which can be seen in Double Silver Point Robes. The two joined canvases have blocks of wood in place of where the figure’s head should be. The block on the right has a knife protruding from it, and a hanging wood element that moves in respond to air currents.
Double Silver Point Robes 1964 53 1/2 x 96 in. silverpoint and acrylic on 2 joined canvases, wood, knife, and string in artist's frame
Description
Bathrobes appeared as a visual motif in Jim Dine’s paintings and prints beginning in 1964, when the artist saw a bathrobe advertisement in a newspaper. Early examples of his bathrobe paintings were identified in their titles as “self portraits.” As Dine later explained, “I probably visualized the axe, the log, and the bathrobe as an extension of myself--a self portrait.”

Dine’s bathrobe paintings were first shown at Sidney Janis gallery in the fall of 1964 – this is one such example – and are among the most recognizable images to have emerged from his long and illustrious career. Double Silver Point Robes is a large scale mixed media assemblage. The drawing is executed in silverpoint – a technique where a piece of silver is used as a drawing implement over a specially prepared ground. The silver drawing oxidizes over a period of several months, finally settling to a warm brown tone which can be seen in Double Silver Point Robes. The two joined canvases have blocks of wood in place of where the figure’s head should be. The block on the right has a knife protruding from it, and a hanging wood element that moves in respond to air currents.