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SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL (1874-1965)

 
In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime. In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime.
By Lake Lugano (C413)c. 194522 x 28 in.(55.88 x 71.12 x 1.91 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
The Studio, Chartwell
Sarah Churchill, Lady Audley
With Wylma Wayne Fine Art
Benjamin and Mary Rummerfield
Estate of Mary Rummerfield
Private Collection, by descent
Exhibition
London, Wylma Wayne Fine Art, Sir Winston Churchill, June-July 1982, no. 50.
Literature
W. Churchill, Painting as a Pastime, Strand Magazine, January 1922, Part 2, illustrated
D. Coombs and M. Churchill, Sir Winston Churchill: His Life and His Paintings, Lyme Regis, 2011, p. 188, no. C 413, fig. 380.
The Paintings of Winston Churchill, LIFE Magazin
...More...e, January 7, 1946
Painting as a Pastime, Sir Winston Churchill, published in the US, 1950, later published in 2002
 
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In 1945, with the war ended and Churchill having suffered a surprising defeat in the general election, he accepted an invitation from Field Marshall Sir Harold Alexander to join him at his Italian villa on the shore of Lake Como. Churchill enjoyed his host's generous hospitality and focused his attention and energy on capturing the region on canvas. He produced fifteen paintings, which embody how painting absorbed his attention and offered an elixir that helped him recharge. This iconic painting was featured in a January 1946 article in LIFE, and has been selected as a color illustration in multiple editions of Churchill’s book, Paintings as a Pastime.
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