Back

PHILIP GUSTON (1913-1980)

 
Before his famous late career resurgence with paintings filled with cartoonish but sinister figures, Philip Guston was a leader of Abstract Expressionism. His abstract works were characterized by dense fields of gestural markings. These atmospheric works showcase a sense of both control and spontaneity – hallmarks of the best Abstract Expressionist works.
<br>
<br>This work on paper is characteristic of Guston’s Abstract Expressionism, showcasing a crucial moment as he moved away from figuration into pure abstraction. The use of just black and white is also indicative of Guston’s preference of stark, limited colors. A similar ink on paper from the same year, “Loft I”, is in the collection of New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In fact, MoMA’s collection features a number of ink on paper works that Guston did throughout the 1950s and 1960s indicating the importance of this practice to his artistic output and process. “Untitled” (c. 1950) anticipates Guston’s “pure drawings” of the late 1960s before he entered his final figurative phase as an artist Before his famous late career resurgence with paintings filled with cartoonish but sinister figures, Philip Guston was a leader of Abstract Expressionism. His abstract works were characterized by dense fields of gestural markings. These atmospheric works showcase a sense of both control and spontaneity – hallmarks of the best Abstract Expressionist works.
<br>
<br>This work on paper is characteristic of Guston’s Abstract Expressionism, showcasing a crucial moment as he moved away from figuration into pure abstraction. The use of just black and white is also indicative of Guston’s preference of stark, limited colors. A similar ink on paper from the same year, “Loft I”, is in the collection of New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In fact, MoMA’s collection features a number of ink on paper works that Guston did throughout the 1950s and 1960s indicating the importance of this practice to his artistic output and process. “Untitled” (c. 1950) anticipates Guston’s “pure drawings” of the late 1960s before he entered his final figurative phase as an artist Before his famous late career resurgence with paintings filled with cartoonish but sinister figures, Philip Guston was a leader of Abstract Expressionism. His abstract works were characterized by dense fields of gestural markings. These atmospheric works showcase a sense of both control and spontaneity – hallmarks of the best Abstract Expressionist works.
<br>
<br>This work on paper is characteristic of Guston’s Abstract Expressionism, showcasing a crucial moment as he moved away from figuration into pure abstraction. The use of just black and white is also indicative of Guston’s preference of stark, limited colors. A similar ink on paper from the same year, “Loft I”, is in the collection of New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In fact, MoMA’s collection features a number of ink on paper works that Guston did throughout the 1950s and 1960s indicating the importance of this practice to his artistic output and process. “Untitled” (c. 1950) anticipates Guston’s “pure drawings” of the late 1960s before he entered his final figurative phase as an artist Before his famous late career resurgence with paintings filled with cartoonish but sinister figures, Philip Guston was a leader of Abstract Expressionism. His abstract works were characterized by dense fields of gestural markings. These atmospheric works showcase a sense of both control and spontaneity – hallmarks of the best Abstract Expressionist works.
<br>
<br>This work on paper is characteristic of Guston’s Abstract Expressionism, showcasing a crucial moment as he moved away from figuration into pure abstraction. The use of just black and white is also indicative of Guston’s preference of stark, limited colors. A similar ink on paper from the same year, “Loft I”, is in the collection of New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In fact, MoMA’s collection features a number of ink on paper works that Guston did throughout the 1950s and 1960s indicating the importance of this practice to his artistic output and process. “Untitled” (c. 1950) anticipates Guston’s “pure drawings” of the late 1960s before he entered his final figurative phase as an artist Before his famous late career resurgence with paintings filled with cartoonish but sinister figures, Philip Guston was a leader of Abstract Expressionism. His abstract works were characterized by dense fields of gestural markings. These atmospheric works showcase a sense of both control and spontaneity – hallmarks of the best Abstract Expressionist works.
<br>
<br>This work on paper is characteristic of Guston’s Abstract Expressionism, showcasing a crucial moment as he moved away from figuration into pure abstraction. The use of just black and white is also indicative of Guston’s preference of stark, limited colors. A similar ink on paper from the same year, “Loft I”, is in the collection of New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In fact, MoMA’s collection features a number of ink on paper works that Guston did throughout the 1950s and 1960s indicating the importance of this practice to his artistic output and process. “Untitled” (c. 1950) anticipates Guston’s “pure drawings” of the late 1960s before he entered his final figurative phase as an artist Before his famous late career resurgence with paintings filled with cartoonish but sinister figures, Philip Guston was a leader of Abstract Expressionism. His abstract works were characterized by dense fields of gestural markings. These atmospheric works showcase a sense of both control and spontaneity – hallmarks of the best Abstract Expressionist works.
<br>
<br>This work on paper is characteristic of Guston’s Abstract Expressionism, showcasing a crucial moment as he moved away from figuration into pure abstraction. The use of just black and white is also indicative of Guston’s preference of stark, limited colors. A similar ink on paper from the same year, “Loft I”, is in the collection of New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In fact, MoMA’s collection features a number of ink on paper works that Guston did throughout the 1950s and 1960s indicating the importance of this practice to his artistic output and process. “Untitled” (c. 1950) anticipates Guston’s “pure drawings” of the late 1960s before he entered his final figurative phase as an artist Before his famous late career resurgence with paintings filled with cartoonish but sinister figures, Philip Guston was a leader of Abstract Expressionism. His abstract works were characterized by dense fields of gestural markings. These atmospheric works showcase a sense of both control and spontaneity – hallmarks of the best Abstract Expressionist works.
<br>
<br>This work on paper is characteristic of Guston’s Abstract Expressionism, showcasing a crucial moment as he moved away from figuration into pure abstraction. The use of just black and white is also indicative of Guston’s preference of stark, limited colors. A similar ink on paper from the same year, “Loft I”, is in the collection of New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In fact, MoMA’s collection features a number of ink on paper works that Guston did throughout the 1950s and 1960s indicating the importance of this practice to his artistic output and process. “Untitled” (c. 1950) anticipates Guston’s “pure drawings” of the late 1960s before he entered his final figurative phase as an artist
Untitledc. 195011 7/8 x 16 1/8 in.(30.16 x 40.96 cm) ink on paper
Provenance
Collection of Renate Ponsold Motherwell, Greenwich
McKee Gallery, New York
Property from an Important European Collection
Sale: Christie’s, Post-War & Contemporary Art Morning Session, 15 November 2017, Lot 607.
Private Collection, California
Exhibition
Amsterdam, Jewish Historical Museum, Philip Guston: An Abstract Artist's Return to the Figurative, November 2013-March 2014, n.p. (illustrated)
Literature
The Guston Foundation confirms that this lot will be included in the future catalogue raisonné of the drawings of Philip Guston
Before his famous late career resurgence with paintings filled with cartoonish but sinister figures, Philip Guston was a leader of Abstract Expressionism. His abstract works were characterized by dense fields of gestural markings. These atmospheric works showcase a sense of both control and spontaneity – hallmarks of the best Abstract Expressionist works.

This work on paper is characteristic of Guston’s Abstract Expressionism, showcasing a crucial moment as he moved away from figuration into pure abstraction. The use of just black and white is also indicative of Guston’s preference of stark, limited colors. A similar ink on paper from the same year, “Loft I”, is in the collection of New York’s Museum of Modern Art. In fact, MoMA’s collection features a number of ink on paper works that Guston did throughout the 1950s and 1960s indicating the importance of this practice to his artistic output and process. “Untitled” (c. 1950) anticipates Guston’s “pure drawings” of the late 1960s before he entered his final figurative phase as an artist
Inquire